FA Airfix Monty'S Humber staff car General Montgomery ww2

FA Airfix Monty'S Humber staff car General Montgomery ww2

Post by LDosse » Sun, 20 Dec 2009 16:27:11




Quote:




>> > Given the innaccuracies we tolerate, it's close enough to G scale to
>> > be relevant.

>> Not sure there's any such scale. If you mean G-gauge that encompasses a
>> gross variety of scales.

>> John.

> Sorry, badly worded on my part.

> MBQ

> -----

> Gauge 1 has two accepted standard scales, namely 10 mm = 1 foot (1:30.48)
> and 3/8 inch = 1 foot (1:32).

And I believe Monty's Humber was 1/32.
 
 
 

FA Airfix Monty'S Humber staff car General Montgomery ww2

Post by Wolf » Sun, 20 Dec 2009 23:16:19


[...]

Quote:
>> Gauge 1 has two accepted standard scales, namely 10 mm = 1 foot
>> (1:30.48) and 3/8 inch = 1 foot (1:32).

> And I believe Monty's Humber was 1/32.

Wording confuses gauge and scale, I think. Again. 10mil (UK only) and
1:32 are for modelling standard gauge (4' 8.5") on gauge 1 (45mm) track.
This has definitely become a minority interest.

Most people now use 1 (45mm) for several narrow gauges, the most common
being meter gage (1:22) and 3ft gauge (1:20.3). For both these scales,
1:24 is usual for buildings, figures, vehicles, etc. Nice mish mash, but
the 6ft rule ("usual viewing distance") shows that the differences in
scale aren't noticeable. Also, because of the large variation in
clearance diagrams for narrow gauges, running meter gauge and 3ft gauge
or even 2ft gauge stock together doesn't offend the eye at all.

OTOH, Aristocraft and USA Trains make 1:29 scale standard gauge trains
for 45mm track. Why? Because 1:32 trains don't look bulky enough next to
narrow gauge stock. And the largest market is garden railways, whose
operators want standard gauge trains to look bigger....

Then there's Thomas, whose scale is indefinable. ;-) But he looks good
running on 45mm track.

cheers,
Wolf K.

 
 
 

FA Airfix Monty'S Humber staff car General Montgomery ww2

Post by jeff » Sun, 20 Dec 2009 23:27:49


Quote:
> Wording confuses gauge and scale, I think. Again. 10mil

Now there is even more confusion "mil" is US parlance for "thou".

Jeff

 
 
 

FA Airfix Monty'S Humber staff car General Montgomery ww2

Post by Wolf » Mon, 21 Dec 2009 01:06:01


Quote:

>> Wording confuses gauge and scale, I think. Again. 10mil

> Now there is even more confusion "mil" is US parlance for "thou".

> Jeff

Sorry about that, I'll rewrite:

"... 10mm scale (UK only)..."

There mow, that should do the job.

wolf k.

 
 
 

FA Airfix Monty'S Humber staff car General Montgomery ww2

Post by LDosse » Mon, 21 Dec 2009 14:49:00



Quote:

> [...]
>>> Gauge 1 has two accepted standard scales, namely 10 mm = 1 foot
>>> (1:30.48) and 3/8 inch = 1 foot (1:32).

>> And I believe Monty's Humber was 1/32.

> Wording confuses gauge and scale, I think. Again. 10mil (UK only) and 1:32
> are for modelling standard gauge (4' 8.5") on gauge 1 (45mm) track. This
> has definitely become a minority interest.

> Most people now use 1 (45mm) for several narrow gauges, the most common
> being meter gage (1:22) and 3ft gauge (1:20.3). For both these scales,
> 1:24 is usual for buildings, figures, vehicles, etc. Nice mish mash, but
> the 6ft rule ("usual viewing distance") shows that the differences in
> scale aren't noticeable. Also, because of the large variation in clearance
> diagrams for narrow gauges, running meter gauge and 3ft gauge or even 2ft
> gauge stock together doesn't offend the eye at all.

> OTOH, Aristocraft and USA Trains make 1:29 scale standard gauge trains for
> 45mm track. Why? Because 1:32 trains don't look bulky enough next to
> narrow gauge stock. And the largest market is garden railways, whose
> operators want standard gauge trains to look bigger....

> Then there's Thomas, whose scale is indefinable. ;-) But he looks good
> running on 45mm track.

Do you have an opinion on the overall appearance of 1/43 scale vehicles with
1/48 scale railroad models (including buildings)? I tend to favor 1/50, but
far more is available in 1/43. In 1/48 about all that is available is a few
WWII military models (AFAIK, not Monty's Humber) such as Russian jeep
equivalents and wee 10hp British vans.
 
 
 

FA Airfix Monty'S Humber staff car General Montgomery ww2

Post by John Turne » Mon, 21 Dec 2009 21:38:50


"jeff"  wrote

Quote:
> Now there is even more confusion "mil" is US parlance for "thou".

uk.rec.models.rail is as it says - a group for UK modellers or modellers
modelling UK prototypes.

The fact that this is also cross-posted to rec.toys.vintage shows the OP has
scant regard for good practice.

John.

 
 
 

FA Airfix Monty'S Humber staff car General Montgomery ww2

Post by Wolf » Tue, 22 Dec 2009 04:18:10


Quote:


[...]
>> Then there's Thomas, whose scale is indefinable. ;-) But he looks good
>> running on 45mm track.

> Do you have an opinion on the overall appearance of 1/43 scale vehicles
> with 1/48 scale railroad models (including buildings)? I tend to favor
> 1/50, but far more is available in 1/43. In 1/48 about all that is
> available is a few WWII military models (AFAIK, not Monty's Humber) such
> as Russian jeep equivalents and wee 10hp British vans.

Well, it seems to depend on the prototype. What appears to matter most
is the relative bulk of vehicles and the buildings they stand next to.
We tend to see vehicles as smaller than they really are; this is the
effect of how we see the "less important" vs "more important" (which
also messes up a lot of photographs - you know, the ones where Aunt
Emmie is a tiny little person in the middle of a landscape. You didn't
notice how small she was in the frame when you looked at the viewfinder.)

So a 1:43 model will tend to look too big next to 1:48, and a 1:50 about
right. However, I have noticed that placing 1:43 and 1:50 next to each
other does not look right, regardless of the relative sizes of the
prototypes. eg, a 1:43 Austin Mini next to 1:50 tank truck looks too big.

HTH
wolf k.

 
 
 

FA Airfix Monty'S Humber staff car General Montgomery ww2

Post by LDosse » Tue, 22 Dec 2009 15:48:24



Quote:


> [...]
>>> Then there's Thomas, whose scale is indefinable. ;-) But he looks good
>>> running on 45mm track.

>> Do you have an opinion on the overall appearance of 1/43 scale vehicles
>> with 1/48 scale railroad models (including buildings)? I tend to favor
>> 1/50, but far more is available in 1/43. In 1/48 about all that is
>> available is a few WWII military models (AFAIK, not Monty's Humber) such
>> as Russian jeep equivalents and wee 10hp British vans.

> Well, it seems to depend on the prototype. What appears to matter most is
> the relative bulk of vehicles and the buildings they stand next to. We
> tend to see vehicles as smaller than they really are; this is the effect
> of how we see the "less important" vs "more important" (which also messes
> up a lot of photographs - you know, the ones where Aunt Emmie is a tiny
> little person in the middle of a landscape. You didn't notice how small
> she was in the frame when you looked at the viewfinder.)

> So a 1:43 model will tend to look too big next to 1:48, and a 1:50 about
> right. However, I have noticed that placing 1:43 and 1:50 next to each
> other does not look right, regardless of the relative sizes of the
> prototypes. eg, a 1:43 Austin Mini next to 1:50 tank truck looks too big.

> HTH

Yeah, it does. The mini/truck adds clarity. Thanks.