Help Removing Dead Oil Cup?

Help Removing Dead Oil Cup?

Post by Doug Whi » Tue, 13 Feb 2001 08:10:08



After many years of searching, I just bought a very used Di-Acro 12"
sheet metal shear.  It needs a lot of restoration, but so far so good.  
One problem is that the lid on one of the little spring loaded oil cups
has busted off, and I'm actually considering removing all 4 to clean it
up & repaint it.  I can get replacement oil cups, but I'm wondering if
anyone has any neat tricks for popping them out of the castings.  A few
thoughts I've had:

1) I could try running a tap down the tube of the oil cup, and then
pulling it out with a bolt.  

2) I could try using a slightly bigger tap, in hopes of cutting far
enough into the tube that I can peel it out like a spring.

3) I could make a dedicated tool from a long bolt.  It would be split
down the center so that it would compress, with a rim on the end to grap
onto the tube once it was pushed through.  If I slip a piece of shim
stock into the slit before pulling, it wouldn't be able to recompress &
spring out.  Sort of like a micro-sized internal gear puller.

I'm leaning towards option #2 becasue I'm concerned about chipping the
casting when I pull the oil cup out.  I have no idea how tight these
things are, and I'm not sure how strong the castings will be in tension
around the hole.

Comments?  Suggestions?

Thanks!

Doug White

 
 
 

Help Removing Dead Oil Cup?

Post by mulli.. » Tue, 13 Feb 2001 08:48:34




Quote:
>   I can get replacement oil cups, but I'm wondering if
> anyone has any neat tricks for popping them out of the castings.

On all the SB lathe aprons I've ever seen, the oil cups are not
really a tight fit in the castings.  I usually just grab the
stump with a pair of channel-locks, and twist and pull, and they
come right out.

The wall thickness of the tubing used to form them is pretty
thin, so it's tough to get a real tight press-fit.

I would advise you to scrape all the goo off the casting before
removing the tube, so none of it gets into the oil hole, and
cork the hole off while cleaning or painting, for similar reasons.

You are pretty smart to replace the oilers, as missing covers or
caps is the beginning of larger problems when chips or junk
get into the oil passages and plug them up.  Then the bearing
runs dry and starts to wear out.

Jim

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Help Removing Dead Oil Cup?

Post by Doug Whi » Tue, 13 Feb 2001 11:16:50


Keywords:

Quote:



>>   I can get replacement oil cups, but I'm wondering if
>> anyone has any neat tricks for popping them out of the castings.

>On all the SB lathe aprons I've ever seen, the oil cups are not
>really a tight fit in the castings.  I usually just grab the
>stump with a pair of channel-locks, and twist and pull, and they
>come right out.

>The wall thickness of the tubing used to form them is pretty
>thin, so it's tough to get a real tight press-fit.

>I would advise you to scrape all the goo off the casting before
>removing the tube, so none of it gets into the oil hole, and
>cork the hole off while cleaning or painting, for similar reasons.

>You are pretty smart to replace the oilers, as missing covers or
>caps is the beginning of larger problems when chips or junk
>get into the oil passages and plug them up.  Then the bearing
>runs dry and starts to wear out.

I did some digging, and they are technically just "Oil Hole Covers".  
Mine are made by Gits, and MSC carries them.  The busted one only sticks
about 1/8" above the surface of the casting, so I don't have much to hang
on to.  A friend suggested putting a plug into the tube so it won't
collapse, which should help.  Fortunately the oil justs lubricates some
pivots, and doesn't feed into any bearings.  It's just a shear, so it
doesn't generate flying little chips the way a lathe or mill would, but I
still want to keep any dirt out that I can.

Doug White

 
 
 

Help Removing Dead Oil Cup?

Post by Tony » Tue, 13 Feb 2001 11:32:05


Try tapping in a "easy out" and twist the sucker out.

--
Tony

Visit TonysToolroom for Surplus Stuff for sale
and my Precision Scraping Page.

Don't skive that belt before you visit my flatbelt page!

www.csgnet.net/toolroom/

Quote:
> After many years of searching, I just bought a very used Di-Acro 12"
> sheet metal shear.  It needs a lot of restoration, but so far so good.
> One problem is that the lid on one of the little spring loaded oil cups
> has busted off, and I'm actually considering removing all 4 to clean it
> up & repaint it.  I can get replacement oil cups, but I'm wondering if
> anyone has any neat tricks for popping them out of the castings.  A few
> thoughts I've had:

> 1) I could try running a tap down the tube of the oil cup, and then
> pulling it out with a bolt.

> 2) I could try using a slightly bigger tap, in hopes of cutting far
> enough into the tube that I can peel it out like a spring.

> 3) I could make a dedicated tool from a long bolt.  It would be split
> down the center so that it would compress, with a rim on the end to grap
> onto the tube once it was pushed through.  If I slip a piece of shim
> stock into the slit before pulling, it wouldn't be able to recompress &
> spring out.  Sort of like a micro-sized internal gear puller.

> I'm leaning towards option #2 becasue I'm concerned about chipping the
> casting when I pull the oil cup out.  I have no idea how tight these
> things are, and I'm not sure how strong the castings will be in tension
> around the hole.

> Comments?  Suggestions?

> Thanks!

> Doug White

 
 
 

Help Removing Dead Oil Cup?

Post by Asp32119 » Tue, 13 Feb 2001 12:32:04


i would take a wood***and use a dent puller.  it worked on my sheldon
lathe.  ball and spring type and the cup type
 
 
 

Help Removing Dead Oil Cup?

Post by Rex the Wrenc » Tue, 13 Feb 2001 13:54:55


Doug,

I had the same situation with my lathe ...just a stub sticking up.
I cleaned the area around the stub, then using a small pin punch and
a 4oz ball-peen hammer, I caved in one side of the tube enough to
get a decent grip with needle nose pliers. A twist of the wrist and
it came out with no drama.

Rex the Wrench

Quote:

>>>snip<<<

> Mine are made by Gits, and MSC carries them.  The busted one only sticks
> about 1/8" above the surface of the casting, so I don't have much to hang
> on to.  

> Doug White

 
 
 

Help Removing Dead Oil Cup?

Post by Jack Erbe » Tue, 13 Feb 2001 14:35:44


Quote:

> Doug,

> I had the same situation with my lathe ...just a stub sticking up.
> I cleaned the area around the stub, then using a small pin punch and
> a 4oz ball-peen hammer, I caved in one side of the tube enough to
> get a decent grip with needle nose pliers. A twist of the wrist and
> it came out with no drama.

> Rex the Wrench

I had the same experience as Rex with removing the stubs of the
non-threaded ones.  

I have replaced several on my Atlas.  If they are a loose fit when you
put them back, you can degrease the smooth sided drilled (maybe reamed?)
holes they go in and use a light coat of the hardening-type Permatex on
the oiler to lock them in.  The Permatex is impervious to oil and sets
up in a day or so.

--

 
 
 

Help Removing Dead Oil Cup?

Post by Bucky Goldstei » Wed, 14 Feb 2001 04:09:12


Quote:

> On all the SB lathe aprons I've ever seen, the oil cups are not
> really a tight fit in the castings.  I usually just grab the
> stump with a pair of channel-locks, and twist and pull, and
> they come right out.

> The wall thickness of the tubing used to form them is pretty
> thin, so it's tough to get a real tight press-fit.

So the SB ones are a press fit, then?  I had assumed threads, and
since mine didn't want to turn easily, I left 'em alone.  If
they're pressed in, that's another thing.  (SB9A)

--
Bucky Goldstein

        Be happy.  Be root.