Spindle Bearing Adjustments

Spindle Bearing Adjustments

Post by GSSVIOL » Thu, 30 Dec 1999 04:00:00



Hi group,

I have an old Brown & Sharpe (Model 2Y) Plain Horizontal Milling Machine.  Does
anyone have any information regarding proper spindle bearing adjustment for
these old beasts.  It's possible that the current set up is fine, but I have a
hunch that it might be slightly loose.  After it runs for a while and warms up
I usually get a pretty steady flow of oil oozing out of the front bearing cover
at the spindle nose.  Or is this common?

Thanks,

Greg

 
 
 

Spindle Bearing Adjustments

Post by mulli.. » Thu, 30 Dec 1999 04:00:00




Quote:
> Hi group,

> I have an old Brown & Sharpe (Model 2Y) Plain Horizontal Milling

Machine.

Does it have the type of spindle with a front bearing with a taper,
and the back bearing cylindrical?  These are adjusted for wear
by simply snugging the thrust collar at the back.

But before thinking about adjusting, you might measure the
clearance in the front bearing, and check to see if there are
any oil drainback holes that are clogged up with goop.

There may also be an oil seal of some sort over the spindle
(is there a threaded ring over the front bearing?) which is worn out.
I recently sold a lathe with an older Hardinge headstock, with a
felt wiper.  The new owner has replaced the worn-out felt to
eliminate an annoying oil seep.

But fwiw these older machines often do dribble a bit, even
when adjusted correctly.

Jim

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.

 
 
 

Spindle Bearing Adjustments

Post by wwest2.. » Fri, 31 Dec 1999 04:00:00




Quote:
> Hi group,

> I have an old Brown & Sharpe (Model 2Y) Plain Horizontal Milling
Machine.  Does
> anyone have any information regarding proper spindle bearing
adjustment for
> these old beasts.  It's possible that the current set up is fine, but
I have a
> hunch that it might be slightly loose.  After it runs for a while and
warms up
> I usually get a pretty steady flow of oil oozing out of the front
bearing cover
> at the spindle nose.  Or is this common?

Boy, are you lucky to own one of these beautiful Brown & sharp mills. I
had one I was in love with and was forced to firesale it. It had a
coned front bearing that could be tightened up by adjusting a threaded
nut at the rear and I think the rear split bronze bearing can be snuged
up by another nut which pulls it tighter by pulling back a tapered
section. Worked great. There was a felt seal at the front bearing that
kept excessive oil drip, but still had a little druel.
Walt West

Quote:
> Thanks,

> Greg

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.
 
 
 

Spindle Bearing Adjustments

Post by Dan Buckma » Fri, 31 Dec 1999 04:00:00


Quote:



> > Hi group,

> > I have an old Brown & Sharpe (Model 2Y) Plain Horizontal Milling
> Machine.  Does
> > anyone have any information regarding proper spindle bearing
> adjustment for
> > these old beasts.  It's possible that the current set up is fine, but
> I have a
> > hunch that it might be slightly loose.  After it runs for a while and
> warms up
> > I usually get a pretty steady flow of oil oozing out of the front
> bearing cover
> > at the spindle nose.  Or is this common?

I have a brown& sharp #3b  I figgure a little oil running down the face
keeps the knee lubed, and just incase the sight gage doesn't work when the
oil stopps its time to add.
does the #2 have the dial a speed, how old are these things
 
 
 

Spindle Bearing Adjustments

Post by GSSVIOL » Sun, 02 Jan 2000 04:00:00


Quote:
>I have a brown& sharp #3b  I figgure a little oil running down the face
>keeps the knee lubed,

< < < That really got a chuckle out of me!

Quote:
>does the #2 have the dial a speed, how old are these things
> > >My hunch was the 2Y was their version of a production mill.  Patents

applied for in 1905.  It is one of  the few machines that I have seen from this
era that was designed with it own electric motor.  It shows no sign of ever
being a line shaft machine. This thing has no "dial a thing", the operator
manually sets the speeds and feeds and then spends the rest of the day spitting
out parts.  Not terribly difficult from the point of changing spindle speeds:
There are two, four stepped cogged pulleys located within the column casting
situated below the spindle. All of which supplies either direct or back gear
drive with 8 spindle speeds ranging from 36 to 535 rpm.  Changing table feeds
is a bit more time consuming by means of individual change gears.  The table
has no conventional leadscrew, it traverses by power feed and has crank on the
front of the knee which engages a rack and pinion for rapid reverse.
Regardless of the lack of bells and whistles, it is still in remarkably good
shape and cuts a lot of metal quite acurately.  Thanks again for all of the
insight and interesting points about these old machines.

Sincerely,

Greg

 
 
 

Spindle Bearing Adjustments

Post by mulli.. » Mon, 03 Jan 2000 04:00:00




Quote:
> Regardless of the lack of bells and whistles, it is still in
> remarkably good
> shape and cuts a lot of metal quite acurately.  Thanks again for all
> of the
> insight and interesting points about these old machines.

I am still curious to know if the spindle has a front cone-shaped
bearing, or if the front bearing is cylindrical, and has a removable
bearing cap.  Did you figure out the oil weep problem?

Jim

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.