beryllium-copper bar stock

beryllium-copper bar stock

Post by Dave Willia » Fri, 19 Feb 1993 06:24:00



 Could someone point me to a source of beryllium-copper bar stock?
2-1/2 bar, thickwall tubing, or 3/8 inch thick by 2-1/2 wide strip would
work.

 
 
 

beryllium-copper bar stock

Post by Jim Kirkpatri » Sat, 20 Feb 1993 21:58:59



Quote:

>  Could someone point me to a source of beryllium-copper bar stock?
> 2-1/2 bar, thickwall tubing, or 3/8 inch thick by 2-1/2 wide strip would
> work.

I can't answer your actual question, but am simply curious why you need
beryllium-copper.  I am aware it is a very good heat conductor, but am
also aware that the beryllium content makes it dangerous to work with.
I came across some BeCu water jackets used on IBM "Thermal Conduction
Modules" (TCMs) and wanted to carve one open on a milling machine for
a display piece.  Our campus hazardous-meterials folks suggested I not
do that, and that the chips/dust would have to be gathered and disposed
of by paying a company lots of bucks to come haul it away (throwing it
in the trash was considered illegal).  Breathing Be, or getting cut by
pieces, is thought to be bad news, even in small concentrations.  Probably
they're over-reacting, like with 1-1-1-trichloroethane (see previous thread
in this newsgroup) but who knows.

Anyway, just a warning, and curious as to why you need it.

Jim Kirkpatrick


 
 
 

beryllium-copper bar stock

Post by Scott M. Hampton aka Woulf » Wed, 24 Feb 1993 05:44:08


Quote:

>I can't answer your actual question, but am simply curious why you need
>beryllium-copper.  I am aware it is a very good heat conductor, but am
>also aware that the beryllium content makes it dangerous to work with.
>I came across some BeCu water jackets used on IBM "Thermal Conduction
>Modules" (TCMs) and wanted to carve one open on a milling machine for
>a display piece.  Our campus hazardous-meterials folks suggested I not
>do that, and that the chips/dust would have to be gathered and disposed
>of by paying a company lots of bucks to come haul it away (throwing it
>in the trash was considered illegal).  Breathing Be, or getting cut by
>pieces, is thought to be bad news, even in small concentrations.  Probably
>they're over-reacting, like with 1-1-1-trichloroethane (see previous thread
>in this newsgroup) but who knows.

When I was working in the shop for a instrument company, we used a lot of BC
for contacts, slip pins, and the like. The material is springy as steel but
a proper conductor. It's usually only 5% beryllium, and the chips aren't
toxic. Usually we were cutting wave guides in the stuff, or special
contacts, but they lathe turned a lot of contact pins on the lathes too. If
you are making anything where you need really springy conductors that are
copper, BC is the way to go. When alloyed with copper at one part in twenty,
the material doesn't turn into the they hazardous form - inhaled dust.

I've worked pure berylliums too, and that is VERY toxic to breath. It
machines like extra-brittle cast iron, but has no discernable grain. VERY
light, very brittle, and a dark grey, that's almost velvet looking when
machined.  It Pure stuff has to be worked on dedicated equipment, in a high
mist environment that is 100% sealed.

Anyway, BC isn't much more of a health risk than anything else that turns
into chips when machined.

--


       Practical Rocketry - or: How to Visit Luna for Only 1M$ a Day!

 
 
 

beryllium-copper bar stock

Post by Charlie Stone 49151 » Wed, 24 Feb 1993 10:08:43



Quote:

> Could someone point me to a source of beryllium-copper bar stock?
>2-1/2 bar, thickwall tubing, or 3/8 inch thick by 2-1/2 wide strip would
>work.

This rings some alarm bells for me.  I think that there are health risks
with machining this stuff.  

Can somebody more Knowledgable comment please?

Charlie Stone.


 
 
 

beryllium-copper bar stock

Post by Kirk Ha » Thu, 25 Feb 1993 04:19:36



|> >
|> >  Could someone point me to a source of beryllium-copper bar stock?
|> > 2-1/2 bar, thickwall tubing, or 3/8 inch thick by 2-1/2 wide strip would
|> > work.
|>
|> I can't answer your actual question, but am simply curious why you need
|> beryllium-copper.

I don't know Dave's reason, either, but BC works well in environments that
must be sparkless.

The museum at Los Alamos National Lab has some of the BC tools that were used
in the early atomic bomb work, including some big files(!).

--
Kirk Hays - NRA Life, seventh generation.
"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to
do nothing."  -- Edmund Burke (1729-1797)

 
 
 

beryllium-copper bar stock

Post by System Janit » Thu, 25 Feb 1993 05:31:15


Quote:

>The museum at Los Alamos National Lab has some of the BC tools that were used
>in the early atomic bomb work, including some big files(!).

You can buy BC framing hammers. There's an add (come to think of it, I
haven't noticed the add lately) in the back of Fine Homebuilding.

Supposedly, you get really good control with this hammer.

-Mike

 
 
 

beryllium-copper bar stock

Post by Jim Kirkpatri » Thu, 25 Feb 1993 10:21:21



Quote:
> This rings some alarm bells for me.  I think that there are health risks
> with machining this stuff.  

> Can somebody more Knowledgable comment please?

I don't claim to be knowledgable, but I do have an OSHA Material
Safety Data Sheet in hand for "Beryllium-Copper Master Alloy".
Copper content is supposed to be at least 94.85%, Beryllium
between 3.75 and 4.50 percent, and lesser amounts of iron, aluminum,
silicon, tin, lead, nickel, chromium, cobalt, and zinc.

They claim this alloy is listed by DOT as a flammable solid but
only in powder form, if I'm reading the sheet correctly.  The
sheet is confusing because it is hard to tell when they are talking
about the alloy (in solid or powdered form) and when they are talking
about the constituent metals.  Beryllium itself is very bad stuff,
and they list it as an "anticipated human carcinogen" which I take
to mean that it hasn't been proven yet but it's expected/suspected.

Much of the rest of the sheet deals with copper or beryllium but
not the alloy, which is annoying and misleading.  They do state
that thermal decomposition may release highly toxic fumes of
beryllium oxide.  They also recommend effective respirators when
dealing with dust/powder, as well as protective clothing and eye
protection.

So, how *** is BeCu Master Alloy?  Beats me!  But I intend to
avoid having much to do with it, and intend to be fairly careful
if I must.  Hopefully the poster of the original question (where
to get bar stock) knows all this already!

Related:  Some radio/tv transmitting tubes use beryllium-ceramic
compounds in their manufacture and warn the curious not to attempt
disassembly of the tube (e.g. show-and-tell with a dead unit)
because the beryllium-ceramic dust is toxic.  This may be mostly
ham-radio folklore, however.

Jim Kirkpatrick

 
 
 

beryllium-copper bar stock

Post by Michael Moron » Thu, 25 Feb 1993 13:31:49


Quote:

>Related:  Some radio/tv transmitting tubes use beryllium-ceramic
>compounds in their manufacture and warn the curious not to attempt
>disassembly of the tube (e.g. show-and-tell with a dead unit)
>because the beryllium-ceramic dust is toxic.  This may be mostly
>ham-radio folklore, however.

I believe this is true.  The beryllium-based ceramics are/were used because
they are excellent conductors of heat.

Also I believe ancient fluorescent tubes used beryllium phosphors.  No need
to worry unless the tube is very old.

-Mike

 
 
 

beryllium-copper bar stock

Post by Michael S. Schechter - ISR group accou » Thu, 25 Feb 1993 22:49:49



Quote:

>>I can't answer your actual question, but am simply curious why you need
>>beryllium-copper.  I am aware it is a very good heat conductor, but am
>>also aware that the beryllium content makes it dangerous to work with.

  Aren't non-sparking tools for explosive atmosphere use made of BC?
(just tossing another note in..)
 
 
 

beryllium-copper bar stock

Post by John Kopf, X63 » Fri, 26 Feb 1993 04:24:46


Quote:
>Related:  Some radio/tv transmitting tubes use beryllium-ceramic
>compounds in their manufacture and warn the curious not to attempt
>disassembly of the tube (e.g. show-and-tell with a dead unit)
>because the beryllium-ceramic dust is toxic.  This may be mostly
>ham-radio folklore, however.

The early flourescent lights (vintage ~1950) had a berylium phosphor inside;  this
became serious when kids used the burned out tubes as "swords", and got cut when
the glass broke driving the beryllium containing phosphor (sort of a powder) into
wounds, which whould then NEVER heal (I heard that the contaminated area had to be
amputated before the wounds would heal).

JK