Vert. milling on Hor. mill

Vert. milling on Hor. mill

Post by Geoffrey Bro » Thu, 25 Jan 1996 04:00:00




says...

Quote:

>In my ongoing shopping for a used mill for my home shop,I've run across
several
>small horizontal mills - Burke, Ames, Hardinge.  Many of the jobs I
would
>be doing lend themselves better to vertical milling - just looking for
comments
>on the viability of bolting angle plates to the table and using it as a
poor
>man's vert. mill.

>Thanks.

I have an Ames mill which I like a lot, but it isn't particularly
good at tasks you would do on a vertical mill.  On most of these
mills, the maximum distance from the end of the spindle to the
center of the table is quite small.  A simple task like drilling
becomes problematic because of the  clearance.

However, many of the small mills do have available vertical attachments.
The Hardinge is especially nice in this regard.  

If you run across any more Ames stuff, please let me know !

Geoffrey Brown
Ithaca, NY

 
 
 

Vert. milling on Hor. mill

Post by Jonathan M. Els » Thu, 25 Jan 1996 04:00:00


: In my ongoing shopping for a used mill for my home shop,I've run across several
: small horizontal mills - Burke, Ames, Hardinge.  Many of the jobs I would
: be doing lend themselves better to vertical milling - just looking for comments
: on the viability of bolting angle plates to the table and using it as a poor
: man's vert. mill.

Well, I've never done that, but there are some severe limitations on the
standard horizontal mill.  Most have very little extension of the spindle
from the column.  Most vertical mills have several inches minimum extension
of the spindle down from the ram, and can then extend the spindle 4 or more
inches further.  The Horiz. mill has no quill feed at all!  The only way
is to feed the work backwards toward the tool, and you can't see what you
are doing.  Ther are people who have made rediculous adaptations to put
a vertical head on a Horiz. mill.  There also have been some quite fine
versions of this.

I have a vertical mill, and since I use it for vertical milling, as a drill
press, and occasionally for a typical small horizontal milling job with an
angle plate, I just think the vertical mill is much more versatile.  If you
have the room for both, and a need to do REAL heavy horizontal milling
(ie making locomotives, lathe beds or something like that) then there REALLY
are horizontal type jobs that you CAN'T do on a vertical.  I recognize that,
but then I don't think I've ever had such a job in enough quantity to make
it worth my while.  (A recent horizontal-type job was to mill 8 .187" wide
slots .030" deep in an aluminum plate, with .500" spacing between the slot
centers.  Now, if I was going to do a bunch of these, and had a horizontal
mill, and could afford 8 cutters and all the spacers, I could have whipped
that job out quickly - but I still did it nicely with the vertical.)