Gingery foundry

Gingery foundry

Post by Paul Erlan » Tue, 07 Jul 1998 04:00:00



        I rammed up and cured the foundry lining this weekend.  It was a fairly
easy process.  I was a little suprised to hear a low volume roar
accompanied by a 18" flame out the vent when I turned on the air blast.
The roar was not loud, just enough to elicit a "cool !", a mischievious
grin and a reminder that this is no toy and deserves respect.
        After the foundry cooled down and I dumped out the ashes, there was a
black, glass like residue stuck to the bottom.  What is it?  Should I do
anything different or is there a way to prevent it?  There wasn't much
there, it was just unexpected.
--
"I don't understand, I cut it twice and it's still to short"

Paul Erland

 
 
 

Gingery foundry

Post by Darrell Yoco » Tue, 07 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

>         I rammed up and cured the foundry lining this weekend.  <snip>
>         After the foundry cooled down and I dumped out the ashes, there was a
> black, glass like residue stuck to the bottom.  What is it?  Should I do
> anything different or is there a way to prevent it?  There wasn't much
> there, it was just unexpected.

I get the same stuff in mine.  Wierd fractal shapes that show up every
time I
fire the furnace.  Most of the stuff can be removed safely, but some
chunks
have become attached to the wall of the furnace.  I knocked one off a
few
weeks ago, and it took some wall with it, so I'll leave the rest.  They
don't seem to bother it.

As an aside, I improved the performance of my furnace dramatically by
adding
a small "table" about 2 inches (5 cm) high in the bottom, high enough to
be
above the tweere hole.  It's made out of 1/4" steel, with holes drilled
in it
to distribute the air, and with angle-iron welded as feet.  Its diameter
is
almost that of the furnace.  It really helps the air flow, distributing
it
over the entire charcoal bed.  

And yes, you gotta love that jet of fire that comes out the top :-)

Darrell Yocom


 
 
 

Gingery foundry

Post by Mr & Mrs William E. Pflum Jr » Fri, 10 Jul 1998 04:00:00


While we're on the subject of charcoal furnaces.  What kind of differences
could I expect to find between a gas fired furnace and a charcoal furnace.
I know the gas one would be cleaner and have faster melts, but would it be
cheaper to use in the long run, buying gas rather than charcoal.  Also what
kind of usage can one get out of a 20lb tank.  As for charcoal, what is an
average amount of charcoal used per burn???  I can see some drawbacks for
both types of furnaces. The charcoal type is extremely simple to build and
appears simple to operate, but takes longer to get a melt and more of a mess
to clean up. The gas on the other hand looks like it might be more
complicated to construct and possibly harder, relatively speaking, to use,
but would provide faster pours with less time needed to clean up.  I have
the charcoal furnace book and like the simplicity of the thing, but have
been wondering as of late if I may be limiting myself and maybe should build
a gas one first so in the future I have room to expand. Yet another quandary
in a long line of quandaries of should I or shouldn't I.  Heres a throwout
question for anyone interested.  Has anyone ever considered making charcoal
from grass clippings??  I was thinking that it might be possible, maybe even
with some kind of solar oven to bake out the water first then compress the
remains and burn, or smolder it under a layer of ground. I volunteered at a
local historical park(Hopewell Furnace in PA) where I split 3 foot logs for
use in making charcoal.  They layered the wood in a tee-pee or tent fashion
covered the pile in dirt and set it on fire, smoldered for a day or two and
then dug up the charcoal.  Would be interesting, we generate 2 or 3 large
bags of clippings a week in the summer and if I could use them to make a
couple of bags of charcoal for a furnace I could really make making my
machine shop cheap!!!

                                            Bill, adventures with

 
 
 

Gingery foundry

Post by Gourdhe » Sat, 11 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Quote:
>I know the gas one would be cleaner and have faster melts, but would it be

cheaper to use in the long run, buying gas rather than charcoal.  Also what
kind of usage can one get out of a 20lb tank?>

My last 20 lb. tank lasted through 6 melts of aluminum, one pot of boiled
crawfish, started 3 charcoal fires, and lasted through two forging sessions in
the shop.

Quote:
> Yet another quandary in a long line of quandaries..>

MY quandary would be "How do I boil crawfish over a charcoal fire?"  In short,
charcoal is good for steaks, but I think you'll find many uses for propane
around the shop.

Gary Brady

 
 
 

Gingery foundry

Post by Ji » Sat, 11 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Group:

I have built a furnace according to Gingery's plans for a charcoal
furnace but built a propane burner for it.  I use 2.5 lbs of propane to
melt 3 lbs on aluminum after the furnace is hot.  I would estimate that
I use 3 lbs for a cold furnace.
--
James Buchanan
Lexington, Kentucky (The Blue Grass State) USA
Building a Climax Locomotive

 
 
 

Gingery foundry

Post by James J Wygral » Sat, 11 Jul 1998 04:00:00




Quote:
>Group:

>I have built a furnace according to Gingery's plans for a charcoal
>furnace but built a propane burner for it.  I use 2.5 lbs of propane to
>melt 3 lbs on aluminum after the furnace is hot.  I would estimate that
>I use 3 lbs for a cold furnace.

Does anyone know approximately how much charcoal it would take to do a
similar melt?
 
 
 

Gingery foundry

Post by Robert Graum » Sat, 11 Jul 1998 04:00:00



Quote:
>While we're on the subject of charcoal furnaces.  What kind of differences
>could I expect to find between a gas fired furnace and a charcoal furnace.
>I know the gas one would be cleaner and have faster melts, but would it be
>cheaper to use in the long run, buying gas rather than charcoal.  Also what
>kind of usage can one get out of a 20lb tank.

There have been several Gingery gas fired crucible furnaces built around
here.  Instead of Gingerys burner arangement, we have used the Ron Reil
burner on propane.  Much easier and cheaper to build.  We can melt
aluminum in about 15 minutes from a cold start, and get about 7 cold
start heats from a 20 lb. tank of propane.   The lifting body of the gas
crucible furnace is much safer and quicker than the fixed charcoal furnace.

        Robert Grauman in Sunny Alberta

 
 
 

Gingery foundry

Post by PKDickm » Sat, 11 Jul 1998 04:00:00



Quote:
Wygralak) writes:
>>I have built a furnace according to Gingery's plans for a charcoal
>>furnace but built a propane burner for it.  I use 2.5 lbs of propane to
>>melt 3 lbs on aluminum after the furnace is hot.  I would estimate that
>>I use 3 lbs for a cold furnace.

>Does anyone know approximately how much charcoal it would take to do a
>similar melt?

I don't know about the Gingery furnace but I use charcoal in my forge (it's
hard to find good coal and my neighbors appreciate the smell better) I use
natural lump charcoal because it's burns cleaner for forging and I prefer it
for barbequeing. I buy a 25 lb bag and it is good for three bronze casting
sessions (usually three pours of about 3-5 lbs of bronze per session), a couple
hours forging and about thirty hamburgers.

For casting the briquettes seem to work better.

Paul K.***man

 
 
 

Gingery foundry

Post by Dave Kei » Sat, 11 Jul 1998 04:00:00



Quote:



>>Group:

>>I have built a furnace according to Gingery's plans for a charcoal
>>furnace but built a propane burner for it.  I use 2.5 lbs of propane to
>>melt 3 lbs on aluminum after the furnace is hot.  I would estimate that
>>I use 3 lbs for a cold furnace.

>Does anyone know approximately how much charcoal it would take to do a
>similar melt?

We poured the tailstock base (~ 4" square, 0.5" thick) plus some smaller
pieces from one melt just last week.  We used about 3-4 lbs of briquettes.

dave

 
 
 

Gingery foundry

Post by Richard W » Sun, 26 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Where did you find it at?
                                            Richard W.


Quote:

>Oops - answered my own question.  I should learn to do Dejanews
>searches *before* I open my mouth... <*sigh>  I found the Ron Reil
>burner.  Since you're reading this anyway, what are your experiences
>with this design?  

>                            -Bill Richman

>                             http://incolor.inetnebr.com/bill_r
>                             (Home of the COSMAC Elf Simulator!)

------------------
This public news site made possible by
the folks at http://extra.newsguy.com
 
 
 

Gingery foundry

Post by Robert Graum » Sun, 26 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

>Oops - answered my own question.  I should learn to do Dejanews
>searches *before* I open my mouth... <*sigh>  I found the Ron Reil
>burner.  Since you're reading this anyway, what are your experiences
>with this design?  
>                            -Bill Richman

At last count, there are about seven Reil burners on Gingery gas fired
crucible furnaces nearby, that I know of.  They operate very well.  We get a
melt in aluminum in about 15 minutes from a cold start, and about 7 melts from
a 20lb tank.  They are a little hard to start, but we start them by shoving a
propane torch in the burner hole, beside the burner.  After a minute warm up,
they are trouble free.  They seem to want a little back pressure to start, so
we start them with the lid on and the body of the furnace in place.  Perhaps
some fiddling with the cone in the burner tip may help the starting problem,
but they work well enough that we have never bothered.  I run my burner at
20 psi, and others tell me that starting at a lower pressure helps.  One
person has mentioned that he had some melting and oxidation on the end of the
burner, so some of us have obtained some 1" stainless steel pipe, and are now
using that for the burner tips.

        Robert Grauman in Sunny Alberta

 
 
 

Gingery foundry

Post by Bill Richm » Mon, 27 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Okay - went to the junkyard today and found some cool bits of
angle-iron with "feet" welded on the bottom, brought them home, cut
them down, and bolted them to the 5 gallon stainless steel cooking pot
I'm using for my furnace body.  Tomorrow I want to put in the
refractory.  I want to use propane in a slightly modified Gingery
charcoal furnace design.  I was going to just use a 1 1/2" copper tube
inserted into the furnace tangent to the inside surface of the
refractory, as in an old TAB book on building your own foundry, but
I'm curious what the "Ron Reil burner" is.  Can anyone help me out
here?  If it's a better design, I'd like to know before I cast the
furnace lining, in case I have to modify anything.


Quote:


>>While we're on the subject of charcoal furnaces.  What kind of differences
>>could I expect to find between a gas fired furnace and a charcoal furnace.
>>I know the gas one would be cleaner and have faster melts, but would it be
>>cheaper to use in the long run, buying gas rather than charcoal.  Also what
>>kind of usage can one get out of a 20lb tank.

>There have been several Gingery gas fired crucible furnaces built around
>here.  Instead of Gingerys burner arangement, we have used the Ron Reil
>burner on propane.  Much easier and cheaper to build.  We can melt
>aluminum in about 15 minutes from a cold start, and get about 7 cold
>start heats from a 20 lb. tank of propane.   The lifting body of the gas
>crucible furnace is much safer and quicker than the fixed charcoal furnace.

>    Robert Grauman in Sunny Alberta

                            -Bill Richman

                             http://incolor.inetnebr.com/bill_r
                             (Home of the COSMAC Elf Simulator!)
 
 
 

Gingery foundry

Post by Bill Richm » Mon, 27 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Oops - answered my own question.  I should learn to do Dejanews
searches *before* I open my mouth... <*sigh>  I found the Ron Reil
burner.  Since you're reading this anyway, what are your experiences
with this design?  

                            -Bill Richman

                             http://incolor.inetnebr.com/bill_r
                             (Home of the COSMAC Elf Simulator!)

 
 
 

Gingery foundry

Post by Robert Graum » Mon, 27 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

>Where did you find it at?

Go to   http://www.webpack.net/~rreil/design.html  and look at the "Aussie"
burner drawings.

        Robert Grauman in Sunny Alberta