They just did it...

They just did it...

Post by Charles Morril » Wed, 16 Feb 2005 10:51:43



     My daughter Sara is 13, and doing a school project on the Ringling
Brothers, Barnum and Bailey circus fire in Hartford Connecticut back in
1944. So, Carol and I drove her up from C***tesville to Hartford
this last weekend to see the site, the initial gravesite of little Miss
1565, the Armory, and anything else we could find.
     It was terrific. We met a nice guy in Windsor who was 15 in 1944
and had cut his way out of the burning tent with a boy scout pocket
knife. He then helped another kid out of the tent, ran to the nearest
pay phone, and called his mother who just about fainted. She was a
single mom, a Bell Telephone switch board operator who had heard the
circus was burning down. He hadn't wanted to go, but she had nudged him
anyway.
     "After that I took the bus home as fast as I could," he said. "I
just felt it was not the place to be."
     This last Saturday was the first time he'd ever talked about it to
just about anyone.
     Carol, myself, Sara and our cousins were at the home of this
person's relative, a gentleman who had gone off to the war and came
back to work at Pratt and Whitney as a machinist. Eventually he founded
a small machine shop devoted to making engine parts.  "We specialized
in the hot section of jet engines," he told me.  "The metals were
difficult to machine. We had to pioneer techniques like EDM back in the
1960s because the metal was so tough."
     Well, this person and I hit it off, you betcha. I think he started
out in his garage, and ended up retiring with something like 250
employees.  Actually, I don't know that he and I hit it off so much as
he is an extremely polite man and very generous with his time to
everyone. I wondered to myself if I'd stepped into an Ayn Rand novel...
     I promised to send him the HSM book on rolling your own EDM.
     I'll never hit the lottery, but if I did, I'd spend most of my
life just trying to listen to some of these people who spent their
lives doing the best they knew how, and never, ever thinking of
themselves as heroes or exceptional in any way. They just learned and
did as fast as they could.
     It reminds me of something an older actress once told me about
*** out with Laurel and Hardy. "They didn't know they were good, no
one had done it before," she said. "They just did it. Nowadays you'd
have a camera on them all the time, but back then, they just did it
whether the camera was rolling or not."

Chas Morrill

 
 
 

They just did it...

Post by Lane » Wed, 16 Feb 2005 12:14:45



Quote:
>     My daughter Sara is 13, and doing a school project on the Ringling
> Brothers, Barnum and Bailey circus fire in Hartford Connecticut back in
> 1944. So, Carol and I drove her up from C***tesville to Hartford this
> last weekend to see the site, the initial gravesite of little Miss 1565,
> the Armory, and anything else we could find.
>     It was terrific. We met a nice guy in Windsor who was 15 in 1944 and
> had cut his way out of the burning tent with a boy scout pocket knife. He
> then helped another kid out of the tent, ran to the nearest pay phone, and
> called his mother who just about fainted. She was a single mom, a Bell
> Telephone switch board operator who had heard the circus was burning down.
> He hadn't wanted to go, but she had nudged him anyway.
>     "After that I took the bus home as fast as I could," he said. "I just
> felt it was not the place to be."
>     This last Saturday was the first time he'd ever talked about it to
> just about anyone.
>     Carol, myself, Sara and our cousins were at the home of this person's
> relative, a gentleman who had gone off to the war and came back to work at
> Pratt and Whitney as a machinist. Eventually he founded a small machine
> shop devoted to making engine parts.  "We specialized in the hot section
> of jet engines," he told me.  "The metals were difficult to machine. We
> had to pioneer techniques like EDM back in the 1960s because the metal was
> so tough."
>     Well, this person and I hit it off, you betcha. I think he started out
> in his garage, and ended up retiring with something like 250 employees.
> Actually, I don't know that he and I hit it off so much as he is an
> extremely polite man and very generous with his time to everyone. I
> wondered to myself if I'd stepped into an Ayn Rand novel...
>     I promised to send him the HSM book on rolling your own EDM.
>     I'll never hit the lottery, but if I did, I'd spend most of my life
> just trying to listen to some of these people who spent their lives doing
> the best they knew how, and never, ever thinking of themselves as heroes
> or exceptional in any way. They just learned and did as fast as they
> could.
>     It reminds me of something an older actress once told me about***
> out with Laurel and Hardy. "They didn't know they were good, no one had
> done it before," she said. "They just did it. Nowadays you'd have a camera
> on them all the time, but back then, they just did it whether the camera
> was rolling or not."

> Chas Morrill

Thanks for sharing!
Lane

 
 
 

They just did it...

Post by Rex » Wed, 16 Feb 2005 23:35:43


Good post, Charles.
Thanks for sharing the experience.

Quote:

>     My daughter Sara is 13, and doing a school project on the Ringling
> Brothers, Barnum and Bailey circus fire in Hartford Connecticut back in
> 1944. So, Carol and I drove her up from C***tesville to Hartford this
> last weekend to see the site, the initial gravesite of little Miss 1565,
> the Armory, and anything else we could find.
>     It was terrific. We met a nice guy in Windsor who was 15 in 1944 and
> had cut his way out of the burning tent with a boy scout pocket knife.
> He then helped another kid out of the tent, ran to the nearest pay
> phone, and called his mother who just about fainted. She was a single
> mom, a Bell Telephone switch board operator who had heard the circus was
> burning down. He hadn't wanted to go, but she had nudged him anyway.
>     "After that I took the bus home as fast as I could," he said. "I
> just felt it was not the place to be."
>     This last Saturday was the first time he'd ever talked about it to
> just about anyone.
>     Carol, myself, Sara and our cousins were at the home of this
> person's relative, a gentleman who had gone off to the war and came back
> to work at Pratt and Whitney as a machinist. Eventually he founded a
> small machine shop devoted to making engine parts.  "We specialized in
> the hot section of jet engines," he told me.  "The metals were difficult
> to machine. We had to pioneer techniques like EDM back in the 1960s
> because the metal was so tough."
>     Well, this person and I hit it off, you betcha. I think he started
> out in his garage, and ended up retiring with something like 250
> employees.  Actually, I don't know that he and I hit it off so much as
> he is an extremely polite man and very generous with his time to
> everyone. I wondered to myself if I'd stepped into an Ayn Rand novel...
>     I promised to send him the HSM book on rolling your own EDM.
>     I'll never hit the lottery, but if I did, I'd spend most of my life
> just trying to listen to some of these people who spent their lives
> doing the best they knew how, and never, ever thinking of themselves as
> heroes or exceptional in any way. They just learned and did as fast as
> they could.
>     It reminds me of something an older actress once told me about
>*** out with Laurel and Hardy. "They didn't know they were good, no
> one had done it before," she said. "They just did it. Nowadays you'd
> have a camera on them all the time, but back then, they just did it
> whether the camera was rolling or not."

> Chas Morrill

--
- -
Rex Burkheimer
WM Automotive
Fort Worth TX