Keeping a lathe and mill warm over winter?

Keeping a lathe and mill warm over winter?

Post by Pete Bergstro » Sun, 04 Dec 2005 01:11:17



Last winter I used lamps to slightly warm my mill and lathe over the
cold period when I don't use the shop (to keep the condensation problem
down). I'm doing that right now, but the light bulbs burn out and even
when working they make a nice glow that escapes the garage, probably
alerting the up-to-no-good-types that there's something of value in there.

I've been looking for coffee-cup warmers, which I've read will do
something similar as they put out about 25 watts of heat. They don't
seem to be around anymore.

Any other suggestions? I have a Model Engineer's Workshop issue from a
few years ago that has a DIY thermostat and heater project, but I'd just
as soon use something cheap and ready-made.

Thanks,
Pete (in St. Paul, MN)

 
 
 

Keeping a lathe and mill warm over winter?

Post by Lloyd E. Sponenburg » Sun, 04 Dec 2005 01:28:56


"Pete Bergstrom" insisted

Quote:
> but I'd just as soon use something cheap and ready-made.

How 'bout pipe warming tape?  You could just wrap a section of the base or
table and let 'er run.  The stuff comes both in bulk or already terminated
with a plug.

LLoyd

 
 
 

Keeping a lathe and mill warm over winter?

Post by F. George McDuffe » Sun, 04 Dec 2005 01:55:06


I ran into the same thing when I went back to Walmart for another
coffee cup warmer.  

They now call these candle warmers to heat the aroma therapy
candles where flames are not allowed or where the soot given off
by the candle when it burns is objectionable.

Look in the Artsy-Fartsy section.  As the clerk for a candle
warmer if you cant find one.  Big notice on the package that
these are not to be used to warm food or beverage.  This may be
why they aren't sold as coffee warmers anymore.

Uncle George

On Fri, 02 Dec 2005 10:11:17 -0600, Pete Bergstrom

Quote:

>Last winter I used lamps to slightly warm my mill and lathe over the
>cold period when I don't use the shop (to keep the condensation problem
>down). I'm doing that right now, but the light bulbs burn out and even
>when working they make a nice glow that escapes the garage, probably
>alerting the up-to-no-good-types that there's something of value in there.

>I've been looking for coffee-cup warmers, which I've read will do
>something similar as they put out about 25 watts of heat. They don't
>seem to be around anymore.

>Any other suggestions? I have a Model Engineer's Workshop issue from a
>few years ago that has a DIY thermostat and heater project, but I'd just
>as soon use something cheap and ready-made.

>Thanks,
>Pete (in St. Paul, MN)

 
 
 

Keeping a lathe and mill warm over winter?

Post by Bob A » Sun, 04 Dec 2005 02:16:37


Pete

A small space heater will keep the place dry. I got mne at COSTCO a few
uears ago. They have a thermostat that will allow it to be used as a
warmer. Perhaps a piece of plastic over your lathe and mill will help.
Bob  AZ

 
 
 

Keeping a lathe and mill warm over winter?

Post by Pete C » Sun, 04 Dec 2005 02:33:10


Quote:

> Last winter I used lamps to slightly warm my mill and lathe over the
> cold period when I don't use the shop (to keep the condensation problem
> down). I'm doing that right now, but the light bulbs burn out and even
> when working they make a nice glow that escapes the garage, probably
> alerting the up-to-no-good-types that there's something of value in there.

> I've been looking for coffee-cup warmers, which I've read will do
> something similar as they put out about 25 watts of heat. They don't
> seem to be around anymore.

> Any other suggestions? I have a Model Engineer's Workshop issue from a
> few years ago that has a DIY thermostat and heater project, but I'd just
> as soon use something cheap and ready-made.

> Thanks,
> Pete (in St. Paul, MN)

Cabella's, Bass Pro Shops, your local gun store and many other places
will have tubular heaters intended to warming gun safes to prevent
condensation and rust.

Pete C.

 
 
 

Keeping a lathe and mill warm over winter?

Post by rigge » Sun, 04 Dec 2005 02:36:04


Quote:

> Last winter I used lamps to slightly warm my mill and lathe over the
> cold period when I don't use the shop (to keep the condensation problem
> down). I'm doing that right now, but the light bulbs burn out and even
> when working they make a nice glow that escapes the garage, probably
> alerting the up-to-no-good-types that there's something of value in there.

> I've been looking for coffee-cup warmers, which I've read will do
> something similar as they put out about 25 watts of heat. They don't
> seem to be around anymore.

These can not be used unless the coils are immersed in liquid
(otherwise they burn out) and besides you can not FULLY immerse them so
the duration of heat will be very short before you need to add liquid
or unplug them.

Quote:
> Any other suggestions? I have a Model Engineer's Workshop issue from a
> few years ago that has a DIY thermostat and heater project, but I'd just
> as soon use something cheap and ready-made.

I just picked-up a used Corona kerosene heater for my shop.  It starts
and runs well and is independant of outside power.  Although I like it
for my use I don't know what the economics will look like yet (compared
to electric or propane).  Another good manufacturer is Kero-Sun.
The simple, lower hassel, solution would be one of those oil filled
electric heaters which look like an old time radiator; they never get
hot enough to ignite things that come their way.  And they work great.

dennis
in nca

 
 
 

Keeping a lathe and mill warm over winter?

Post by Dave Hin » Sun, 04 Dec 2005 02:49:57


Quote:


>> Cabella's, Bass Pro Shops, your local gun store and many other places
>> will have tubular heaters intended to warming gun safes to prevent
>> condensation and rust.

> I would really like to find a small, safe heating element that would
> make perhaps abou 30 watts or so. I need two, one to keep the poultry
> waterer from freezing, and I would put another into my welding
> machine. I will check out cabelas.

Iggy, I've got a box of power resistors looking for a good home.  All
NOS Mallory stuff.  Cover shipping plus 5 bucks, they're yours.  Will
(just) fit into a flat-rate box, so there's probably 50  of 'em in
there.  Up to 100 ohm/100 watt, all heavy duty ceramic wirewound type.

Dave "Have I mentioned I've got lots of oddball stuff?" Hinz

 
 
 

Keeping a lathe and mill warm over winter?

Post by Steve » Sun, 04 Dec 2005 02:56:42



[snip]

Quote:
>> Any other suggestions? I have a Model Engineer's Workshop issue from a
>> few years ago that has a DIY thermostat and heater project, but I'd just
>> as soon use something cheap and ready-made.

>> Thanks,
>> Pete (in St. Paul, MN)

> Cabella's, Bass Pro Shops, your local gun store and many other places
> will have tubular heaters intended to warming gun safes to prevent
> condensation and rust.

> Pete C.

It's called a "Golden Rod".  Here are some
http://www.sports4fan.com/boating/golden_rod.html

Steve.

 
 
 

Keeping a lathe and mill warm over winter?

Post by Steve » Sun, 04 Dec 2005 02:59:59



Quote:


>> Last winter I used lamps to slightly warm my mill and lathe over the
>> cold period when I don't use the shop (to keep the condensation problem

[snip]

Quote:
> I just picked-up a used Corona kerosene heater for my shop.  It starts
> and runs well and is independant of outside power.  Although I like it
> for my use I don't know what the economics will look like yet (compared
> to electric or propane).  Another good manufacturer is Kero-Sun.
> The simple, lower hassel, solution would be one of those oil filled
> electric heaters which look like an old time radiator; they never get
> hot enough to ignite things that come their way.  And they work great.

> dennis
> in nca

First time I heated my shop with a kerosene heater I got surface rust all
over the place.  Some folks replied that this is due to the chemicals
released when the kerosene is burned in an enclosed space.  A nice man got
an almost new kerosene heater at my yard sale.

YMMV.

Steve.

 
 
 

Keeping a lathe and mill warm over winter?

Post by Pete Bergstro » Sun, 04 Dec 2005 03:03:09


Quote:


>>Cabella's, Bass Pro Shops, your local gun store and many other places
>>will have tubular heaters intended to warming gun safes to prevent
>>condensation and rust.

> I would really like to find a small, safe heating element that would
> make perhaps abou 30 watts or so. I need two, one to keep the poultry
> waterer from freezing, and I would put another into my welding
> machine. I will check out cabelas.

I thought about aquarium heaters for my machines, but they'd probably be
more appropriate for your use.

Thanks,
Pete

 
 
 

Keeping a lathe and mill warm over winter?

Post by Pete Bergstro » Sun, 04 Dec 2005 03:04:38


Quote:


>>Last winter I used lamps to slightly warm my mill and lathe over the
>>cold period when I don't use the shop (to keep the condensation problem
>>down). I'm doing that right now, but the light bulbs burn out and even
>>when working they make a nice glow that escapes the garage, probably
>>alerting the up-to-no-good-types that there's something of value in there.

>>I've been looking for coffee-cup warmers, which I've read will do
>>something similar as they put out about 25 watts of heat. They don't
>>seem to be around anymore.

> These can not be used unless the coils are immersed in liquid
> (otherwise they burn out) and besides you can not FULLY immerse them so
> the duration of heat will be very short before you need to add liquid
> or unplug them.

I was thinking of the ones where you set a coffee cup on the warmer
which sits on your desk. I'd turn a metal disk to sit on the warmer and
make good contact with the machine.

Thanks,
Pete

 
 
 

Keeping a lathe and mill warm over winter?

Post by Pete Bergstro » Sun, 04 Dec 2005 03:05:34


Quote:

> I ran into the same thing when I went back to Walmart for another
> coffee cup warmer.  

> They now call these candle warmers to heat the aroma therapy
> candles where flames are not allowed or where the soot given off
> by the candle when it burns is objectionable.

> Look in the Artsy-Fartsy section.  As the clerk for a candle
> warmer if you cant find one.  Big notice on the package that
> these are not to be used to warm food or beverage.  This may be
> why they aren't sold as coffee warmers anymore.

Aha! I'll go searching this weekend.

Thanks!!
Pete

 
 
 

Keeping a lathe and mill warm over winter?

Post by Pete Bergstro » Sun, 04 Dec 2005 03:09:08


Quote:

> "Pete Bergstrom" insisted

>>but I'd just as soon use something cheap and ready-made.

> How 'bout pipe warming tape?  You could just wrap a section of the base or
> table and let 'er run.  The stuff comes both in bulk or already terminated
> with a plug.

That might work very well for the colder temperatures. I used one of
these to keep my mother's well from freezing up. Several years without a
problem so far. The one I got had a thermostat that kicked in just above
freezing; maybe I can find one that I could control across the range of
dewpoints from season to season.

Thanks!
Pete

 
 
 

Keeping a lathe and mill warm over winter?

Post by Pete Bergstro » Sun, 04 Dec 2005 03:15:18


Quote:

> Cabella's, Bass Pro Shops, your local gun store and many other places
> will have tubular heaters intended to warming gun safes to prevent
> condensation and rust.

Ah, it looks like a GoldenRod with an thermostatic circuit for on/off
control will do what I want. I might want to do a bit more on the
insulating side of my cover tarps, though.

Thanks!
Pete

 
 
 

Keeping a lathe and mill warm over winter?

Post by Ned Simmon » Sun, 04 Dec 2005 03:20:00




Quote:

> Last winter I used lamps to slightly warm my mill and lathe over the
> cold period when I don't use the shop (to keep the condensation problem
> down). I'm doing that right now, but the light bulbs burn out and even
> when working they make a nice glow that escapes the garage, probably
> alerting the up-to-no-good-types that there's something of value in there.

If you put a few large light bulbs in series they'll last
forever and not produce much light. Since the resistance of
the lamp filaments varies with temperature, you'd probably
have to do some experimenting with the number and/or
wattage of the lamps while monitoring the current in order
to hit your 25W target.

Ned Simmons