bastard files et al.

bastard files et al.

Post by Sam Solta » Mon, 22 Mar 2004 11:06:48



What is the difference between a file and a rasp?
Files and rasps are both bars of steel with teeth cut into the metal. It is
how the teeth are cut and shaped that distinguishes the file from the rasp.

Files have teeth that extend as continuous rows across the face at an angle.
Files with rows of teeth going in one direction are called mill files. Files
with rows going in both directions are called double-cut or flat files. Mill
files generally provide smoother finishes than double-cut files.

The closer the rows are to each other, the finer the cut of the file in use.
Coarse files are called bastard files. Medium files are called second-cut
files. Fine files are called smooth files.

 
 
 

bastard files et al.

Post by Ro » Mon, 22 Mar 2004 11:36:21


The question is how did they get to be called a bastard!

On Sat, 20 Mar 2004 21:06:48 -0500, "Sam Soltan"

Quote:

>===<>
>===<>What is the difference between a file and a rasp?
>===<>Files and rasps are both bars of steel with teeth cut into the metal. It is
>===<>how the teeth are cut and shaped that distinguishes the file from the rasp.
>===<>
>===<>
>===<>Files have teeth that extend as continuous rows across the face at an angle.
>===<>Files with rows of teeth going in one direction are called mill files. Files
>===<>with rows going in both directions are called double-cut or flat files. Mill
>===<>files generally provide smoother finishes than double-cut files.
>===<>
>===<>
>===<>The closer the rows are to each other, the finer the cut of the file in use.
>===<>Coarse files are called bastard files. Medium files are called second-cut
>===<>files. Fine files are called smooth files.
>===<>

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bastard files et al.

Post by Stephen Youn » Mon, 22 Mar 2004 11:42:32


Quote:

> The question is how did they get to be called a bastard!

>>===<>The closer the rows are to each other, the finer the cut of the file in use.
>>===<>Coarse files are called bastard files. Medium files are called second-cut
>>===<>files. Fine files are called smooth files.
>>===<>

Well, most bastards ARE coarse for one thing!
 
 
 

bastard files et al.

Post by Martin H. Eastbur » Mon, 22 Mar 2004 15:39:55


Quote:


>> The question is how did they get to be called a bastard!

>>> ===<>The closer the rows are to each other, the finer the cut of the
>>> file in use.
>>> ===<>Coarse files are called bastard files. Medium files are called
>>> second-cut
>>> ===<>files. Fine files are called smooth files.
>>> ===<>

> Well, most bastards ARE coarse for one thing!

Yep - check out the wood working ones ! - Hook type teeth.

--

NRA LOH, NRA Life
NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder

 
 
 

bastard files et al.

Post by Dale Scroggin » Mon, 22 Mar 2004 15:56:42


Quote:

> The question is how did they get to be called a bastard!

<snip>

While holding a file as you would normally, look at the diagonal cuts.
Notice they go from top right to bottom left.

Then do a google on "battune sinister" and read what it represents in a
coat of arms.

At least, that's the explanation I've given students for years when they
ask why we call them bastard files.

Dale Scroggins

 
 
 

bastard files et al.

Post by Richard Co » Mon, 22 Mar 2004 22:39:07


Quote:
>From: Dale Scroggins
> "battune sinister"
>At least, that's the explanation I've given students for years when they
>ask why we call them bastard files.

I vote for this one as the best story yet about the origins of the name.

This thread reminds me of the old joke about the helpful young clerk in the
hardware store talking to the grizzled old customer about the purchase of a new
file,
"Sir, would you like one of these little bastards?"  And the customer drawls,
"No, but I'll take that big motherfuc*er there in the corner."

Richard Coke

 
 
 

bastard files et al.

Post by A.Gen » Mon, 22 Mar 2004 22:40:51



Quote:
> >From: Dale Scroggins

> > "battune sinister"

> >At least, that's the explanation I've given students for years when they
> >ask why we call them bastard files.

> I vote for this one as the best story yet about the origins of the name.

> This thread reminds me of the old joke about the helpful young clerk in the
> hardware store talking to the grizzled old customer about the purchase of a new
> file,
> "Sir, would you like one of these little bastards?"  And the customer drawls,
> "No, but I'll take that big motherfuc*er there in the corner."

> Richard Coke

Careful - or I'll tell the one about the RAF Spitfire pilot and the Fokkers.

Jeff

 
 
 

bastard files et al.

Post by Trevor Jone » Tue, 23 Mar 2004 01:00:13


Quote:

> The question is how did they get to be called a bastard!

  My understanding is that it was a bastard size, not fine, not coarse.
Apparently dating back to the "good old days" when file teeth were cut
with a chisel, one row at a time.

 Cheers
  Trevor Jones

 
 
 

bastard files et al.

Post by DGolb » Tue, 23 Mar 2004 01:34:49


Quote:

>This thread reminds me of the old joke about the helpful young clerk in the
>hardware store talking to the grizzled old customer about the purchase of a
>new
>file,
>"Sir, would you like one of these little bastards?"  And the customer drawls,
>"No, but I'll take that big motherfuc*er there in the corner."

At the general store, they kept raisin bread on the top shelf.  Soon every one
knew that the Cute Young Thing who worked there wore nothing under her dress,
so they all asked for raisin bread, just to make her climb the ladder.

One day an old geezer came into the store, just in time to look up the ladder
at Cute Young Thing.  She called down to him "Well, is yours raison too?"  And
he answered "Well, it's twitchin' a mite."

 
 
 

bastard files et al.

Post by Offbree » Tue, 23 Mar 2004 06:08:49


Quote:


>>The question is how did they get to be called a bastard!

>   My understanding is that it was a bastard size, not fine, not coarse.
> Apparently dating back to the "good old days" when file teeth were cut
> with a chisel, one row at a time.

I'd be calling them "bastards" instead of "files".