seneca falls lathe

seneca falls lathe

Post by Apachefor » Sat, 07 Oct 2000 10:41:12



Oh frabjerous day, calloo, callay! A friend had a senaca falls 10 inch
lathe in his barn for a few years and has found a SB 9 in great shape.
So the seneca comes to me.
   It is an old heavy-duty flat belt with about 28 inch between centers.
it is all original condition but the bearings were rebuilt a few years ago
and has had light use during that time. Has a QC box with a small set of change
gears I imagine is for odd thread sizes. It is stout enough to take a .250 pass
on A-36 steel. Wieghs about 1000 lbs stand, motor and tool. Its slow, about 600
rpm on the top end, but will work for me!
Now then, I know nithing of this brand. Can any one point me in a direction for
a history on this company?Thanx, Rufo
 
 
 

seneca falls lathe

Post by G. J. Kueble » Sat, 07 Oct 2000 09:36:14


I found a smaller Seneca Falls "STAR" lathe a few years ago...they used to
be made in Seneca Falls, New York.   I exchanged some correspondence with a
few people who had STAR's, but I could never find anyone with a manual.  

Harold Barker in Ada, Ohio had a catalog / manual listed in his  catalog of
old stuff, but he didn't have it in stock when I called about a year ago.

Good luck
Greg K
K-town PA



Quote:
> Oh frabjerous day, calloo, callay! A friend had a senaca falls 10 inch
> lathe in his barn for a few years and has found a SB 9 in great shape.
> So the seneca comes to me.
>    It is an old heavy-duty flat belt with about 28 inch between centers.
> it is all original condition but the bearings were rebuilt a few years
ago
> and has had light use during that time. Has a QC box with a small set of
change
> gears I imagine is for odd thread sizes. It is stout enough to take a
250 pass
> on A-36 steel. Wieghs about 1000 lbs stand, motor and tool. Its slow,
about 600
> rpm on the top end, but will work for me!
> Now then, I know nithing of this brand. Can any one point me in a
direction for
> a history on this company?Thanx, Rufo


 
 
 

seneca falls lathe

Post by Jerry Kimberli » Sat, 07 Oct 2000 12:31:45


Quote:

> I found a smaller Seneca Falls "STAR" lathe a few years ago...they used to
> be made in Seneca Falls, New York.   I exchanged some correspondence with a
> few people who had STAR's, but I could never find anyone with a manual.

> Harold Barker in Ada, Ohio had a catalog / manual listed in his  catalog of
> old stuff, but he didn't have it in stock when I called about a year ago.

Go to: http://www.lathes.co.uk/  They have a manual on the Star
Lathe, there is only one manual for all sizes.....  They also
have pictures so you can see if your's is similar to any on the
site.

JerryK

 
 
 

seneca falls lathe

Post by Jibpil » Sat, 07 Oct 2000 12:51:40


Quote:
> Can any one point me in a direction for
>a history on this company?

Go to http://www.lathes.co.uk/page21.html

I have a Seneca Falls 10 inch with the lower motor mount and a reversing flat
belt drive.  This machine, was, I believe originally used on a ship.  The
cabinet it is mounted on is heavy gauge steel plate held together with 1/2"
rivets.  Some of my extras have U.S. Navy stamped on them.  Maybe it's from
some long gone dreadnought. I enjoy mine, hope  you have a good time with
yours.

Gunnar Blanke

 
 
 

seneca falls lathe

Post by Bill Brown » Sat, 07 Oct 2000 14:42:26


Quote:

> Oh frabjerous day,

Oh frabjerous day?  I have no idea what the hell that means, but if you
got a lathe out the deal, congratulations.  I'm afraid I have no info to
help you, but I remember the day I got my SB9...truly a frabjerous day.
And every day that I've gotten to stand in front of it and make swarf.

--
Bill Browne                     Medical Claims Processing,
Excalibur                       Taft-Hartley Fund Tracking &
http://excalibur-dbf.com    Pension Administration Software

 
 
 

seneca falls lathe

Post by Nigel Eato » Sat, 07 Oct 2000 04:00:00




Quote:
>Oh frabjerous day?  I have no idea what the hell that means, but if you

Slight typo, it should be 'frabjous':

JABBERWOCKY

   `Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
     Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
   All mimsy were the borogoves,
     And the mome raths outgrabe.

   `Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
     The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
   Beware the Jujub bird, and shun
     The frumious Bandersnatch!'

   He took his vorpal sword in hand:
     Long time the manxome foe he sought --
   So rested he by the Tumtum gree,
     And stood awhile in thought.

   And as in uffish thought he stood,
     The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
   Came whiffling through the tulgey wook,
     And burbled as it came!

   One, two!  One, two!  And through and through
     The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!
   He left it dead, and with its head
     He went galumphing back.

   `And has thou slain the Jabberwock?
     Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
   O frabjous day!  Calloh!  Callay!
     He chortled in his joy.

   `Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
     Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
   All mimsy were the borogoves,
     And the mome raths outgrabe.

Clear now?   ;^)

Nigel
--
Have you hugged *your* lathe today?
------------
Nigel Eaton

 
 
 

seneca falls lathe

Post by Dan Bollinge » Sat, 07 Oct 2000 04:00:00


Quote:
> I found a smaller Seneca Falls "STAR" lathe a few years ago...they used to
> be made in Seneca Falls, New York.

Goulds Pumps is also in Seneca Falls.  Cute little mill town in the finger
lakes region.  The defunct Eisenhouer College is there, too.   Women's
sufferage began there.   Dan
 
 
 

seneca falls lathe

Post by Bill Brown » Sat, 07 Oct 2000 04:00:00


Quote:



> >Oh frabjerous day?  I have no idea what the hell that means, but if you

> Slight typo, it should be 'frabjous':

> JABBERWOCKY

>    `Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
>      Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
>    All mimsy were the borogoves,
>      And the mome raths outgrabe.

>    `Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
>      The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
>    Beware the Jujub bird, and shun
>      The frumious Bandersnatch!'

>    He took his vorpal sword in hand:
>      Long time the manxome foe he sought --
>    So rested he by the Tumtum gree,
>      And stood awhile in thought.

>    And as in uffish thought he stood,
>      The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
>    Came whiffling through the tulgey wook,
>      And burbled as it came!

>    One, two!  One, two!  And through and through
>      The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!
>    He left it dead, and with its head
>      He went galumphing back.

>    `And has thou slain the Jabberwock?
>      Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
>    O frabjous day!  Calloh!  Callay!
>      He chortled in his joy.

>    `Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
>      Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
>    All mimsy were the borogoves,
>      And the mome raths outgrabe.

> Clear now?   ;^)

> Nigel
> --
> Have you hugged *your* lathe today?
> ------------
> Nigel Eaton

Clear as mud.

*please* tell me you didn't type that from memory. :)

--
Bill Browne                     Medical Claims Processing,
Excalibur                       Taft-Hartley Fund Tracking &
http://excalibur-dbf.com    Pension Administration Software

 
 
 

seneca falls lathe

Post by Joe Wa » Sat, 07 Oct 2000 04:00:00


On Fri, 06 Oct 2000 08:36:32 -0500, Bill Browne

Quote:


>> JABBERWOCKY

>Clear as mud.

>*please* tell me you didn't type that from memory. :)

======
It's strange what sticks in some people's minds. For me it's "The
Cremation of Sam McGee" and a short poem about beer.

Joe
Sierra Specialty Automotive
Brake cylinders sleeved with brass
Delco alternator One-Wire conversions
http://www.brakecylinder.com

 
 
 

seneca falls lathe

Post by Ed Peterso » Sat, 07 Oct 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

> Oh frabjerous day, calloo, callay! A friend had a senaca falls 10 inch
> lathe in his barn *Snip*
> Now then, I know nithing of this brand. Can any one point me in a direction for
> a history on this company?Thanx, Rufo

Before taking too many .250 passes with that thing MAKE SURE that you
have clean oil of the proper type getting to the headstock. 'Stars' have
their spindle running in integral castiron bearings with caps and if
that setup gets trashed it's boatanchor time. I sadly had to pass one
one of these fine old lathes 'cause the headstock was blown out and had
visible and had audible up-and-down play. The owner had skimmed the
bearing caps in an attempt to correct this but what he ended up with was
ellipical bearing areas and a lathe you could light cigarettes off of
after 5 minutes of operation. Once he had shimmed them it was back to
slop city.

The descendant of the company that made 'Stars' still exists, but
unfortunately they aren't interested in your lathe or selling you any parts.

Still wish I woulda bought that machine, though. Coulda made one heck of
a woodlathe out of it.

Congrats and lube that thing,
Ed Peterson

DISCLAIMER: Unless otherwise indicated, this correspondence is a personal
opinion and NOT an official statement of Aero Design and Mfg. Co. Inc.

 
 
 

seneca falls lathe

Post by mulli.. » Sat, 07 Oct 2000 04:00:00




Quote:
> Before taking too many .250 passes with that thing MAKE SURE that you
> have clean oil of the proper type getting to the headstock. 'Stars'

have their spindle running in integral castiron bearings with caps and
if that setup gets trashed it's boatanchor time.

Actually some of them use bronze bushings in the cast iron headstock,
as can be seen in the first photo below.  But the caveats are well
taken, indeed.  Often these older lathes were run without shims
under the bearing caps, and it was up to the operator to snug or
slack off the bearing cap screws depending on what they were doing
at the time.  That's the way this 9" Seneca Falls Star lathe was
when I found it:

http://www.metalworking.com/dropbox/Seneca1.jpg
http://www.metalworking.com/dropbox/Seneca2.jpg
http://www.metalworking.com/dropbox/Seneca3.jpg
http://www.metalworking.com/dropbox/Seneca4.jpg

I always thought the Star machines had a very similar-looking
tailstock to the Reed-Prentice machines.  Wonder if there was
some kind of cross-pollination going on back then?

Jim

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.

 
 
 

seneca falls lathe

Post by Bray Hav » Sat, 07 Oct 2000 04:00:00


Quote:
>The
>cabinet it is mounted on is heavy gauge steel plate held together with 1/2"
>rivets.  Some of my extras have U.S. Navy stamped on them.  Maybe it's from
>some long gone dreadnought. I enjoy mine, hope  you have a good time with

I had one of these I used for gunsmithing for years.  Mine came off a
submarine.  Great machine.  I wish I had it back.  A 9" with 2" riser blocks.  

Greg Sefton

 
 
 

seneca falls lathe

Post by Fdmorris » Sat, 07 Oct 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

>The descendant of the company that made 'Stars' still exists, but
>unfortunately they aren't interested in your lathe or selling you any parts.

They are the Seneca Falls Technologies Group (?) if memory serves.  But at this
point an extremely remote descendant.  

The original company lasted until about 1924-5 when it was bankrupt.  It was at
that point that it changed hands, and the machine tool lines from the Fitchburg
Machine  Works were shipped up there.  So that probably would have been the
ending date for production of the Star line of lathes.

I was there a couple of years ago, and could find nothing on the firm.  I
understand from a friend who was there this summer that there is now some
historical group there that has information on the firm, but I don't have an a
or e-dress.

Perhaps someone from Central New York can help?

Frank Morrison

 
 
 

seneca falls lathe

Post by Ed Peterso » Sat, 07 Oct 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

.

> Actually some of them use bronze bushings in the cast iron headstock,
> as can be seen in the first photo below.  But the caveats are well
> taken, indeed.  Often these older lathes were run without shims
> under the bearing caps, and it was up to the operator to snug or
> slack off the bearing cap screws depending on what they were doing
> at the time.  That's the way this 9" Seneca Falls Star lathe was
> when I found it:

Well I learn something new every day. The one I looked at was straight
castiron, though-at least on the chuck side-if it had had bushings I'd
have bought it in a heartbeat. I wanted that thing BAD. However, that
was when I was looking for a primary machine-if I had spent the bux on
that I would have ended up with a unusable antique and nothing to make
new parts on. Couldn't afford both. Bummer. By the time I had my
new-bought Chicom special up and running, the guy had sold the 'Star'.
So, no super-duper woodlathe for me. (Which is OK I as have an old
U.S.one and use of dad's big Delta when I need it.) Still woulda made an
interesting project, heretical as it may seem to a metalworking forum.
Making a new, smaller spindle and figuring out how to ream/bore the
existing slopped bearing area to take ball bearings and a drive system
would have kept me out of trouble for awhile, I'm sure. If I could have
figured it out at all. "watch how fast this saddle flies when you spin
this baby at woodlathe speeds"

The 'Star' I looked at must have been newer, tho-I don't remember the
Jules-Verne looking touches like on that one of yours. That
compound-curved threading chart is really cool. Maybe it had one but the
clunking headstock had my main attention.

Oddly that shot 'Star' I looked at was the only used machine I've ever
personally seen that looked like somebody had actually cared to maintain
it in the least-i.e. it was relatively clean and not rusted solid in
various places or dinged all to heck and back. The other stuff I looked
at would have had anyone with a shred of mechanical sympathy holding
back puke. Too bad about the headstock.

grumble,mutter,
Ed Peterson

DISCLAIMER: Unless otherwise indicated, this correspondence is a personal
opinion and NOT an official statement of Aero Design and Mfg. Co. Inc.

 
 
 

seneca falls lathe

Post by Tom Marti » Sat, 07 Oct 2000 20:59:09


So the author's spell checker didn't work either! <g>

Tom

Quote:



> >Oh frabjerous day?  I have no idea what the hell that means, but if you

> Slight typo, it should be 'frabjous':

> JABBERWOCKY

>    `Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
>      Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
>    All mimsy were the borogoves,
>      And the mome raths outgrabe.

>    `Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
>      The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
>    Beware the Jujub bird, and shun
>      The frumious Bandersnatch!'

>    He took his vorpal sword in hand:
>      Long time the manxome foe he sought --
>    So rested he by the Tumtum gree,
>      And stood awhile in thought.

>    And as in uffish thought he stood,
>      The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
>    Came whiffling through the tulgey wook,
>      And burbled as it came!

>    One, two!  One, two!  And through and through
>      The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!
>    He left it dead, and with its head
>      He went galumphing back.

>    `And has thou slain the Jabberwock?
>      Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
>    O frabjous day!  Calloh!  Callay!
>      He chortled in his joy.

>    `Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
>      Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
>    All mimsy were the borogoves,
>      And the mome raths outgrabe.

> Clear now?   ;^)

> Nigel
> --
> Have you hugged *your* lathe today?
> ------------
> Nigel Eaton