keeping wood dust, cast iron, grinder dust etc.from your lathe

keeping wood dust, cast iron, grinder dust etc.from your lathe

Post by Wm. Congreve (S » Wed, 31 Jan 1996 04:00:00



With all this talk about ebony dust (and with the price of ebony as it
is there won't be all that much being made!) don't forget that the skin
surface of cast iron is horribly abrasive, and putting a grinder on the
tool post can create terrible problems.

But there's a very easy solution, which I'e used for years.  Go to the
grocerty store and get the extra-heavy duty (not merely heavy duty)
aluminum foil.  wrap it around everything, til the lathe looks like
it's a turkey ready for the oven. Unlike the old method of draping oily
rags, which can be very dangerous if a piece of rag gets picked up by
the spindle or chuch, the foil will just tear a little bit and stay in
place. If you're using the cross slide then obviusly you do have to
leave the lathe bed exposed,  but that's a lot easier to get clean than
the insides of bearings.

I find the aluminum foil handy not only for that, but for various
coverup jobs.  Leave a big sheet under the bed of the lathe, with the
edges turned up, and when it gets swarfed up a bit, ease it out, ball
it up, and throw it in the garbage can.

(British readers are encouraged to use aluMINIUM, instead, but it
doesn't work quite as well)

                          Alan Heldman

 
 
 

keeping wood dust, cast iron, grinder dust etc.from your lathe

Post by Terry Oqu » Tue, 06 Feb 1996 04:00:00



Quote:
>With all this talk about ebony dust (and with the price of ebony as it
>is there won't be all that much being made!) don't forget that the skin
>surface of cast iron is horribly abrasive, and putting a grinder on the
>tool post can create terrible problems.
>But there's a very easy solution, which I'e used for years.  Go to the
>grocerty store and get the extra-heavy duty (not merely heavy duty)
>aluminum foil.  wrap it around everything, til the lathe looks like
>it's a turkey ready for the oven. Unlike the old method of draping oily
>rags, which can be very dangerous if a piece of rag gets picked up by
>the spindle or chuch, the foil will just tear a little bit and stay in
>place. If you're using the cross slide then obviusly you do have to
>leave the lathe bed exposed,  but that's a lot easier to get clean than
>the insides of bearings.
>I find the aluminum foil handy not only for that, but for various
>coverup jobs.  Leave a big sheet under the bed of the lathe, with the
>edges turned up, and when it gets swarfed up a bit, ease it out, ball
>it up, and throw it in the garbage can.

>(British readers are encouraged to use aluMINIUM, instead, but it
>doesn't work quite as well)
>                          Alan Heldman

I have toyed with the idea of modifying one of the commercial bellows
units usually seen covering the ways on expensive mills and lathes to
cover those of my Atlas 12x36.  The one catalog I have is from
Milwaukee Protective Covers.  Their address is 332 E. Reservoir Ave.,
Milwaukee, WI  53212-3749, telephone 1-800-553-6331.  They make some
three-sided bellows that look like they would cover a lathe's ways
nicely.  Maybe this might work for you as well.

Terry Oquin