OT & long: Shoptask, racism, and the tyranny of political correctness

OT & long: Shoptask, racism, and the tyranny of political correctness

Post by PLAlbrec » Sat, 10 Mar 2001 06:29:18



A few hours ago, "Shoptask" (presumably its owner, John Taylor, although he
never admits to having any name) in effect called me a racist: "Having said
that, he now has another entire population to despise because God endowed them
with a different skin color and funny way of speaking.  One can only shudder at
what festering bile would spew forth if we bought machines from Africa."

Somebody just sent me the following. In the spirit of Gunner's long copies of
various pieces of 2nd Amendment information, I offer to you Charlton Heston's
1999 speech to the Harvard Law School Forum.

So how does this relate to Shoptask etc.? His espoused politically correct view
would prohibit anybody from pointing out the shortcomings of imported trash, as
the stuff is made in other places by people of other races and therefore any
attack on their products must also be an attack on these races themselves.
Ergo, racism. Unless you buy Chinese/Indian/Taiwanese/whatever imports, you are
racist. It doesn't matter that the merchandise is substandard, you MUST buy to
be politically correct!

I am proud to be politically incorrect, free to speak my own mind. And on
occasion to point out that the emperor is running around *** again, which
gives me great personal pleasure (no matter who the emperor happens to be).
That does not, however, mean that I am a racist, much as Shoptask would like to
paint me with that brush as it is his only remaining defense. (Actually, I
listened to an interview with civil rights activist/comedian*** Gregory the
other day, and he has a quite different take on racism as opposed to prejudice.
One is systematic and official, one is personal. By Gregory's standards,
Shoptask doesn't have a clue what racism is). This sort of muddle-headed
political correctness to serve a hidden agenda is just one more example of what
Charlton Heston talks about below. Read it and think.

Pete

=====================================================

  For 50 years, the Harvard Law School Forum has been sponsoring speeches by
 luminaries ranging from Fidel Castro to Gerald Ford to Dr. Ruth. Sometimes
 the speeches have generated a bit of media coverage, sometimes not. But one
 given last month by Charlton Heston has taken on a life of its own. Heston,
the actor and conservative activist, delivered a stem-winder to about 200
listeners about "a cultural war that's about to hijack your birthright to think
and say what resides in your heart."

 'Winning the Cultural War'
 Charlton Heston's Speech to the Harvard Law School Forum, Feb 16, 1999

I remember my son when he was five, explaining to his kindergarten class
what his father did for a living. "My Daddy," he said, "pretends to be people."

 There have been quite a few of them. Prophets from the Old and New
 Testaments, a couple of Christian saints, generals of various nationalities
 and different centuries, several kings, three American presidents, a French
 cardinal and two geniuses, including Michelangelo. If you want the ceiling
 repainted I'll do my best. There always seem to be a lot of different fellows
 up here. I'm never sure which one of them gets to talk. Right now, I guess
 I'm the guy.

 As I pondered our visit tonight it struck me: If my Creator gave me the gift
 to connect you with the hearts and minds of those great men, then I want to
 use that same gift now to reconnect you with your own sense of liberty of
 your own freedom of thought ... your own compass for what is right.

 Dedicating the memorial at Gettysburg, Abraham Lincoln said of America, "We
 are now engaged in a great Civil War, testing whether this nation or any
 nation so conceived and so dedicated can long endure." Those words are true
 again. I believe that we are again engaged in a great civil war, a cultural
 war that's about to hijack your birthright to think and say what resides in
 your heart. I fear you no longer trust the pulsing life*** of liberty
 inside you ... the stuff that made this country rise from wilderness into
 the miracle that it is.

 Let me back up. About a year ago I became president of the National Rifle
 Association, which protects the right to keep and bear arms. I ran for
 office, I was elected, and now I serve ... I serve as a moving target for
 the media who've called me everything from "ridiculous" and "duped" to a
 "brain-injured, senile, crazy old man." I know ... I'm pretty old ... but
 I'm sure, Lord, I ain't senile. As I have stood in the crosshairs of those who

 target Second Amendment freedoms, I've realized that firearms are not the
 only issue. No, it's much, much bigger than that.  I've come to understand
that a cultural war is raging across our land, in which, with Orwellian fervor,
certain acceptable thoughts and speech are mandated. For example, I marched for
civil rights with Dr. King in 1963 - long before Hollywood found it
fashionable. But when I told an audience last year that white pride is just as
valid as black pride or red pride or anyone else's pride, they called me a
racist.

 I've worked with brilliantly talented ***s all my life. But when I
 told an audience that gay rights should extend no further than your rights
 or my rights, I was called a homophobe. I served in World War II against the
 Axis powers. But during a speech, when I drew an analogy between singling
 out innocent Jews and singling out innocent gun owners, I was called an
 anti-Semite. Everyone I know knows I would never raise a closed***against
 my country. But when I asked an audience to oppose this cultural
 persecution, I was compared to Timothy McVeigh.

 From Time magazine to friends and colleagues, they're essentially saying,
 "Chuck, how dare you speak your mind. You are using language not authorized
 for public consumption!" But I am not afraid. If Americans believed in
 political correctness, we'd still be King George's boys-subjects bound to
 the British crown.

 In his book, "The End of Sanity," Martin Gross writes that "blatantly
 irrational behavior is rapidly being established as the norm in almost every
 area of human endeavor. There seem to be new customs, new rules, new
 anti-intellectual theories regularly foisted on us from every direction.
 Underneath, the nation is roiling. Americans know something without a name
 is undermining the nation, turning the mind mushy when it comes to
 separating truth from falsehood and right from wrong. And they don't like it."

Let me read a few examples. At Antioch college in Ohio, young men seeking
intimacy with a coed must get verbal permission at each step of the process
from kissing to petting to final *** ... all clearly spelled out in a
printed college directive.  In New Jersey, despite the death of several
patients nationwide who had been infected by dentists who had concealed their
AIDs --- the state commissioner announced that health providers who are
HIV-positive need not ..... need not..... tell their patients that they are
infected.

 At William and Mary, students tried to change the name of the school team
 "The Tribe" because it was supposedly insulting to local Indians, only to
 learn that authentic ***ia chiefs truly like the name.

 In San Francisco, city fathers passed an ordinance protecting the rights of
 ***s to cross-dress on the job, and for trans***s to have
 separate toilet facilities while undergoing sex change surgery.

 In New York City, kids who don't speak a word of Spanish have been placed in
 bilingual classes to learn their three R's in Spanish solely because their
 last names sound Hispanic.

 At the University of Pennsylvania, in a state where thousands died at
 Gettysburg opposing slavery, the president of that college officially set up
 segregated dormitory space for black students.

Yeah, I know ... that's out of bounds now. Dr. King said "Negroes." Jimmy
Baldwin and most of us on the March said "black." But it's a no-no now. For me,
hyphenated identities are awkward ... particularly "Native-American." I'm a
Native American, for God's sake. I also happen to be a ***-initiated brother
of the Miniconjou Sioux.
 On my wife's side, my grandson is a thir***th generation native American
 ... with a capital letter on "American."

 Finally, just last month ... David Howard, head of the Washington
 D.C.,Office of Public Advocate, used the word "***rdly" while talking to
colleagues
 about budgetary matters. Of course, "***rdly" means stingy or scanty. But
 within days Howard was forced to publicly apologize and resign. As columnist
 employ were morons who (a) didn't know the meaning of ***rdly, (b) didn't
know how to use a dictionary to discover the meaning, and (c) actually demanded
that he
 apologize for their ignorance."

 What does all of this mean? It means that telling us what to think has
 evolved into telling us what to say, so telling us what to do can't be far
 behind. Before you claim to be a champion of free thought, tell me: Why did
 political correctness originate on America's campuses? And why do you
 continue to tolerate it? Why do you, who're supposed to debate ideas,
 surrender to their suppression?

 Let's be honest. Who here thinks your professors can say what they really
 believe? It scares me to death, and should scare you too, that the
 superstition of political correctness rules the halls of reason. You are the
 best and the brightest. You, here in the fertile cradle of American
 academia, here in the castle of learning on the Charles River, you are the
cream. But submit that you, and your counterparts across the land, are the most
 socially conformed and politically silenced generation since Concord Bridge.
And as
 long as you validate that ... and abide it ... you are-by your grandfathers'
standards-cowards.

 Here's another example. Right now at more than one major
...

read more »

 
 
 

OT & long: Shoptask, racism, and the tyranny of political correctness

Post by Marvin W. Klo » Sat, 10 Mar 2001 07:36:57



<good stuff and Heston speech snipped for brevity>

It's damn good someone finally had the b***s to come out and say it.
Very interesting that the only one with the guts is someone already vilified for
his association with the NRA, an organization oft equated with the NASDAP in the
minds of most PC sheeple.  The extent of the problem he describes is highlighted
by the fact that we already accept the fact that no public figure with anything
to lose would have the nerve to say something like that.  In the twisted logic
of the liberals, a speech decrying political correctness is itself politically
incorrect.  So much for free speech.  Now that it's guaranteed, it's taboo.  

I like his chutzpah (is using that word ok? or does that make me an
anti-Semite?) in presenting it at Harvard, the veritable fount of empty-headed
liberalism and meaningless psychobabble in this country.  Charlie obviously
knows who needed most to hear it.

Marv, an anti-PC-American

--
HSM Freeware Programs at
http://www.geocities.com/mklotz.geo

 
 
 

OT & long: Shoptask, racism, and the tyranny of political correctness

Post by PLAlbrec » Sat, 10 Mar 2001 09:45:24


Marv Klotz wrote re Charlton Heston:

Quote:
>I like his chutzpah (is using that word ok? or does that make me an

anti-Semite?)

I think it's more than OK. Unless I'm mistaken, Charlton Heston is Jewish,
which makes labelling him anti-Semitic even more absurd. But then that's a
typical last-ditch denunciation used by people who can't find any other handle
with which to attack somebody. Just like the "racist" gambit recently attempted
by Shoptask.

Pete

 
 
 

OT & long: Shoptask, racism, and the tyranny of political correctness

Post by eberlei » Sat, 10 Mar 2001 10:58:18


Heston did a fantastic job of portraying Moses 30+ years ago, and he is continuing
the tradition of speaking the truth (however unpopular with some) as president of
the NRA.

Mike Eberlein (who admits to being a fan, both of the man, his politics, and his
movies)

Quote:

> Marv Klotz wrote re Charlton Heston:

> >I like his chutzpah (is using that word ok? or does that make me an
> anti-Semite?)

> I think it's more than OK. Unless I'm mistaken, Charlton Heston is Jewish,
> which makes labelling him anti-Semitic even more absurd. But then that's a
> typical last-ditch denunciation used by people who can't find any other handle
> with which to attack somebody. Just like the "racist" gambit recently attempted
> by Shoptask.

> Pete

 
 
 

OT & long: Shoptask, racism, and the tyranny of political correctness

Post by Bucky Mulliga » Sat, 10 Mar 2001 11:42:51


But Pete, aren't you being just a bit too *** the two bit
middleman class? To make a profit is good, so what if it's made by
positioning yourself between the slave and the stupid? Just give it a
bit more time. The communists aren't dimwits. They already have their
own transportation systems (Cosco etc) in place on this continent, and
their own retailing outlets are not far behind.

Shoptask's and the other communist***spittle outlet's days are
numbered. When they are out of business, these are the same people
that will be asking the government why they weren't protected. At this
time, though, "It's a free country, I can import/sell what I want, and
I don't care how the hell the stuff's made!!" Just keep sending the
money over there, it only speeds the day his former suppliers shut him
down. By letting the marketplace decide, of course..

The Nazi's killed 1300% FEWER people than shoptask's business
partners, and he's calling YOU a racist? Wow!

mike II

 
 
 

OT & long: Shoptask, racism, and the tyranny of political correctness

Post by John Flanag » Sat, 10 Mar 2001 12:37:47



Excellent post Pete.  I didn't realize Mr. Heston was so eloquent.
Reminds me when I took freshman english back in '93.  We were told
what we could and couldn't write (everything we wrote had to be PC).
I of course was much older than all the other student's, in fact only
a little younger than the prof.  Needless to say I think I embarrassed
the stupidity of the PC mentality :^).  There were a number of black
students in the class who despite my bashing the PC black propoganda
with some very memorable verbage, seemed to like me quite a bit :^).
Did I mention the grade I got?  It rhymes with "F".

John

 
 
 

OT & long: Shoptask, racism, and the tyranny of political correctness

Post by cl.. » Sun, 11 Mar 2001 00:39:29



Quote:
>Marv Klotz wrote re Charlton Heston:

>>I like his chutzpah (is using that word ok? or does that make me an
>anti-Semite?)

>I think it's more than OK. Unless I'm mistaken, Charlton Heston is Jewish,
>which makes labelling him anti-Semitic even more absurd. But then that's a
>typical last-ditch denunciation used by people who can't find any other handle
>with which to attack somebody. Just like the "racist" gambit recently attempted
>by Shoptask.

>Pete

Just a note here re: names and anti-semitism.
Albrecht and Albright are from the same root. Many Albrights in N.
America can trace the name to Albrecht in Alsace. Many Albrights were
German Jews. Not saying all Albrights were originally Albrecht, or
that there is necessarily any relationship. However, there is no
reason for anti-sematism. Fostered largely by the "organized church"
accusing the jews of being "Christ Killers", they forget and forgot
that Christ himself was a Jew, and that his purpose on earth was to
come and die. If the Jews had not been the ones to put him to death,
it would have had to be us, the Gentiles, for his job to have been
done. Also, the original Christians were largely of Jewish backround.
Yiddish slang has become as much a part of the american idiom as Irish
and many others - so use of the term "chutzpah" sure does NOT make one
an anti-semite in America. It's just a bit more socially acceptable
than saying he's got "balls".
 
 
 

OT & long: Shoptask, racism, and the tyranny of political correctness

Post by PLAlbrec » Sun, 11 Mar 2001 01:45:56


Quote:
>Just a note here re: names and anti-semitism.
>Albrecht and Albright are from the same root. Many Albrights in N.
>America can trace the name to Albrecht in Alsace.

So, what you're saying is, maybe I DO have a claim to that Albrecht wine
fortune?

Oh, frabjous day!

Pete

 
 
 

OT & long: Shoptask, racism, and the tyranny of political correctness

Post by Marvin W. Klo » Sun, 11 Mar 2001 02:41:16


Quote:


>>Marv Klotz wrote re Charlton Heston:

>>>I like his chutzpah (is using that word ok? or does that make me an
>>anti-Semite?)

>>I think it's more than OK. Unless I'm mistaken, Charlton Heston is Jewish,
>>which makes labelling him anti-Semitic even more absurd. But then that's a
>>typical last-ditch denunciation used by people who can't find any other handle
>>with which to attack somebody. Just like the "racist" gambit recently attempted
>>by Shoptask.

>>Pete

>Just a note here re: names and anti-semitism.
>Albrecht and Albright are from the same root. Many Albrights in N.
>America can trace the name to Albrecht in Alsace. Many Albrights were
>German Jews. Not saying all Albrights were originally Albrecht, or
>that there is necessarily any relationship. However, there is no
>reason for anti-sematism. Fostered largely by the "organized church"
>accusing the jews of being "Christ Killers", they forget and forgot
>that Christ himself was a Jew, and that his purpose on earth was to
>come and die. If the Jews had not been the ones to put him to death,
>it would have had to be us, the Gentiles, for his job to have been
>done. Also, the original Christians were largely of Jewish backround.
>Yiddish slang has become as much a part of the american idiom as Irish
>and many others - so use of the term "chutzpah" sure does NOT make one
>an anti-semite in America. It's just a bit more socially acceptable
>than saying he's got "balls".

Hey, Clare, I *was* kidding.  (That'll teach me to be more religious about
including smileys.)

Marv

--
HSM Freeware Programs at
http://www.geocities.com/mklotz.geo

 
 
 

OT & long: Shoptask, racism, and the tyranny of political correctness

Post by eberlei » Sun, 11 Mar 2001 03:41:49


Hate to tell you this, but the corect term is "pagan", not "gentile."

Pagan implies all those who do not believe in a single God.  Gentile is usually
reserved for non-Jewish persons who believe in God but not necessarily the Hebrew
version of same.

Mike Eberlein (who has always been amused by the amount of mass carnage done by real
believers in the name of their "true" God).

Quote:

> <snip><snip>

> had not <the Jews> been the ones to put him to death,
> it would have had to be us, the Gentiles, for his job to have been
> done.

 
 
 

OT & long: Shoptask, racism, and the tyranny of political correctness

Post by Peter Forbe » Sun, 11 Mar 2001 07:27:46


Quote:

> >Just a note here re: names and anti-semitism.
> >Albrecht and Albright are from the same root. Many Albrights in N.
> >America can trace the name to Albrecht in Alsace.

> So, what you're saying is, maybe I DO have a claim to that Albrecht wine
> fortune?

> Oh, frabjous day!

> Pete

"'Twas brillig and the slithey toves did gyre and gimbal in the wabe" ??

Peter

Peter & Rita Forbes

Lister Cold-Starting Diesel Engines
Engine info etc at:-
http://www.oldengine.org/members/diesel

 
 
 

OT & long: Shoptask, racism, and the tyranny of political correctness

Post by PLAlbrec » Sun, 11 Mar 2001 07:51:11


Yet another Peter (Forbes, truth be told) wrote

Quote:
>"'Twas brillig and the slithey toves did gyre and gimbal in the wabe" ??

No doubt.

Which reminds me. I need to rent the video of another Michael Palin (and Terry
Gilliam) masterpiece, "Jabberwocky." I'm now reading Palin's "The Complete
Ripping Yarns" (and yes, Gunner's SIG about emerging half-drunk behind the
headmaster's desk with 200 cigarettes and a half-*** Filipino lady is
absolutely correct, from "Tomkinson's Schooldays."

Pete

 
 
 

OT & long: Shoptask, racism, and the tyranny of political correctness

Post by Kenneth W. Sterli » Sun, 11 Mar 2001 12:41:50



Quote:
>>Just a note here re: names and anti-semitism.
>>Albrecht and Albright are from the same root. Many Albrights in N.
>>America can trace the name to Albrecht in Alsace.

>So, what you're saying is, maybe I DO have a claim to that Albrecht wine
>fortune?

>Oh, frabjous day!

>Pete

Don't get too e***d about it, Pete.
I kinda figure when my ship comes in, I'll be waiting at the
*airport*.   :-)
Ken.