quilting on cruise

quilting on cruise

Post by Mary » Fri, 18 Feb 2005 00:47:13



Take your quilting with you on your cruise!  I recently took the first
leg of the QE2 world cruise (New York to LA via Panama Canal), and took
a small (45") piece of whole cloth quilting with me.  I would sit by
the windows outside the Grand Lounge in the late afternoon, sip a soda
pop, and stitch while listening to rehearsals for the evening show,
bingo, or just the ***.  People walking by who won't bother a person
reading a book will stop to chat, and it's a great way to meet some
very nice folks!  Other people worked on paper piecing, counted cross
stitch, knitting, tatting, and tapestries.  As to traveling with my
quilting, I put the piece and my little tool box into a tote bag and
tucked the whole thing into checked baggage, which let me have my
favorite embroidery scissors, needles, and seam ripper and which kept
security folks from pawing through my carry-on bag.

Next trip I may take piecing with me.  I normally cut out all fabric
for a patchwork quilt at one time, and put all the pieces for
individual blocks into business-size envelopes, one block per envelope.
 Before I retired I would take an envelope and little tool box in a
tote bag with me and work on piecing over lunch hour in the lounge.
That would be very do-able on board ship as well.

 
 
 

quilting on cruise

Post by Polly Esthe » Fri, 18 Feb 2005 11:31:30


Mary, I missed my chance. When the SuperBowl was in Jacksonville, the mayor
realized that there just wasn't enough room for the visitors. Somehow he
managed to have several cruise ships dock at Jacksonville to house the
overflow of guests.  If I had only known.
    I would love to go on a cruise.  I just don't want to leave the shore.
Polly


Quote:
> Take your quilting with you on your cruise!  I recently took the first
> leg of the QE2 world cruise (New York to LA via Panama Canal), and took
> a small (45") piece of whole cloth quilting with me.  I would sit by
> the windows outside the Grand Lounge in the late afternoon, sip a soda
> pop, and stitch while listening to rehearsals for the evening show,
> bingo, or just the ***.  People walking by who won't bother a person
> reading a book will stop to chat, and it's a great way to meet some
> very nice folks!  Other people worked on paper piecing, counted cross
> stitch, knitting, tatting, and tapestries.  As to traveling with my
> quilting, I put the piece and my little tool box into a tote bag and
> tucked the whole thing into checked baggage, which let me have my
> favorite embroidery scissors, needles, and seam ripper and which kept
> security folks from pawing through my carry-on bag.

> Next trip I may take piecing with me.  I normally cut out all fabric
> for a patchwork quilt at one time, and put all the pieces for
> individual blocks into business-size envelopes, one block per envelope.
>  Before I retired I would take an envelope and little tool box in a
> tote bag with me and work on piecing over lunch hour in the lounge.
> That would be very do-able on board ship as well.