OT refrigerator cookie recipe

OT refrigerator cookie recipe

Post by J* » Tue, 18 Aug 2009 08:05:23



i'd bet with a little creativity you could sneak some into quite a few
meals.
was reading up on the alzh/tumeric, seems it is also a good
anti-inflamatory.
herbs and spices have uses along with flavouring our foods.
they make a difference inside us that often we never even consider.
j.

Quote:
"Roberta" wrote...

You'd probably have to eat a LOT of it. But it's also good as a
substitute for saffron to make your rice a lovely yellow. Might be a
good fabric dye too.
Roberta in D


Quote:
>Sure, it's a bold activity ... but what fun.  Do sprinkle some on a
>spoonful
>of cream cheese and spread it on a couple of  crackers.  Your tongue will
>either say 'mmmm',  'yick'  or 'very interesting'.  It does indeed let you
>test and learn.  I am particularly interested in turmeric.  The nice doctor
>on Sunday Morning Fox news was telling us that there's a study reporting
>that turmeric (an ingredient in curry spice mixtures) was found to be
>helpful in preventing Alzheimer's.  No turmeric in the spice collection
>here
>but you can bet your boots that we'll  be spreading it on cream cheese soon
>. . . or the Cheerio's or hamburger buns.  Polly

 
 
 

OT refrigerator cookie recipe

Post by onetexsu » Tue, 18 Aug 2009 13:35:01


My household isn't too fond of curry, except for me, so I only cook
curry once in a while. When I do I  go the Thai route and use that
incredible yellow curry with coconut milk and pineapple. Then
everybody (almost) will eat it. Of course, they pick out the veggies,
but that always happens.

I have been reading a good bit about spices that are anti-
inflammatory. As a result I've been working tumeric into quite a few
foods. Scrambled eggs, various sauces that would be prettier yellow,
rice -- along with raisins, pine nuts and chopped almonds, you name
it..... If you use too much tumeric it makes food sour. But a little
is good. I don't notice a difference in my physical feeling, but it's
still good to eat things that are good for us.

Sunny

 
 
 

OT refrigerator cookie recipe

Post by Robert » Tue, 18 Aug 2009 17:23:18


Wish I could send you pumpkins. I planted *one* plant in the spring.
It has taken over my little veggie patch, smothered pretty much
everything but the mint, marched off across the flower bed, over the
fence to the neighbor's garden. We will have a lot of pumpkins, and so
will the neighbor.
Roberta in D



Quote:
>ta, Susan, copied and saved.
>we made chocolate pumpkin cake last night and it is really moist and
>delicious.
>disagreed on what flavour frosting/icing to use.
>i thot that chocolate would knock out any hope of tasting the pumpkin so
>asked dh to make plain vanilla. i was right.
>it was delicious and you can taste the pumpkin still.
>i love pumpkin.
>we also had a pumpkin pie.
>we also had pumpkin soup and pumpkin risotto.
>it was a full on pumpkin meal and it was divine.
>dh bought one large pumpkin for $1.99 on friday.
>seemed the best thing to do was cook it all at once (roasted it in the oven
>first).
>now lets see what to have for lunch, hmmm.
>all those leftovers, hmmmm.
>j.

>"Susan Torrens"  wrote...
>Here is a recipe for a little fancier refrigerator cookie!
>Ribbon Cookies
>1 cup butter or margarine
>1 1/4 cup sugar
>1 egg
>1/2 teaspoon vanilla
>2 1/4 cup flour
>1/4 teaspoon salt
>1 square unsweetened chocolate, melted
>1 1/4 teaspoon baking powder
>1/4 cup chopped nuts
>red food colour
>Cream butter and sugar; add egg, vanilla, then flour, salt and baking
>powder.  Divide dough in 3 parts.  Stir melted chocolate and nuts into one
>part, and red food colour into another.
>Line a loaf pan with wax paper.  Pack plain dough in pan.  Spoon chocolate
>dough over plain dough, then follow with pink dough.  Cover with wax paper
>and press layers together and smooth top.  Chill at least 24 hours.
>The original recipe calls for cutting the block in half, lengthwise, but I
>like to cut it into thirds, so make more, slightly smaller cookies.

>I have kept the dough in the refrigerator for up to a month, well wrapped.

>Susan in Kingston ON
>quilting as usual......

>http://community.webshots.com/user/sbtinkingston


>> Here's a plan that went all wrong.  Neighbor had back surgery.  She's
>> walking now; I see her creep to the lane and back - very slowly.  Thought
>> I'd take her some home-baked cookies and real lemonade.  Did okay with the
>> lemonade.  The cookies were insipid.  Gummy on top, nearly nearly burned
>on
>> bottom and about as tasty as batting.
>>     Do any of you who live with Cookie Monsters have a great recipe for
>> refrigerator cookies?  I mean the kind where you do the preparation mess,
>> make a roll of the dough and keep it in the refrigerator to slice and bake
>> later. I need help.  Polly

 
 
 

OT refrigerator cookie recipe

Post by J* » Tue, 18 Aug 2009 17:29:51


wow, that sounds amazing, do get some pix of it for posterity if nothing
else.
who would believe they'd get that big.
must take a mess of water to keep up with all that growth too.
what kind of pumpkin is it?
pix, girl, i want pix of it.
pumpkin is possibly my favourite vegetable, well along with tomatos.
both are sooooo versatile.
when do you harvest them in your neck of the woods?
dh just asked what you're gonna do with all of them?
he is the chef in our house....with suggestions from me that is.
dont forget the chocolate pumpkin cake. the recipe i used only took a cup of
pumpkin so easily done.
j.

"Roberta" wrote ...
Wish I could send you pumpkins. I planted *one* plant in the spring.
It has taken over my little veggie patch, smothered pretty much
everything but the mint, marched off across the flower bed, over the
fence to the neighbor's garden. We will have a lot of pumpkins, and so
will the neighbor.
Roberta in D

 
 
 

OT refrigerator cookie recipe

Post by Robert » Wed, 19 Aug 2009 01:22:02


I'm almost afraid to go out and count them. Trips to the compost
holder have become safaris through pumpkin jungle, although the
glorious huge gold flowers give me great pleasure. We've had plenty of
rain this summer, along with a decent amount of sun, obviously perfect
pumpkin weather. These are Hokkaidos. One beast is just right for a
pot of soup, and they don't have to be peeled if you plan to puree.
They make good pies too. And I like them roasted in the pan, along
with the meat, potatoes, etc. Might do a photo just for you tomorrow,
but the whole plant won't fit in one frame. The jungle is getting a
bit dim and creepy now as the sun is going down :-) But I do love
spotting the hedgehog, now and then. Oh, and the eldest pumpkin looks
just about ripe! I usually harvest whatever's left just before the
first frost, and they keep well for 2-3 months if cool.
Roberta in D



Quote:
>wow, that sounds amazing, do get some pix of it for posterity if nothing
>else.
>who would believe they'd get that big.
>must take a mess of water to keep up with all that growth too.
>what kind of pumpkin is it?
>pix, girl, i want pix of it.
>pumpkin is possibly my favourite vegetable, well along with tomatos.
>both are sooooo versatile.
>when do you harvest them in your neck of the woods?
>dh just asked what you're gonna do with all of them?
>he is the chef in our house....with suggestions from me that is.
>dont forget the chocolate pumpkin cake. the recipe i used only took a cup of
>pumpkin so easily done.
>j.

>"Roberta" wrote ...
>Wish I could send you pumpkins. I planted *one* plant in the spring.
>It has taken over my little veggie patch, smothered pretty much
>everything but the mint, marched off across the flower bed, over the
>fence to the neighbor's garden. We will have a lot of pumpkins, and so
>will the neighbor.
>Roberta in D

 
 
 

OT refrigerator cookie recipe

Post by Sherr » Wed, 19 Aug 2009 02:03:53



Quote:
> Wish I could send you pumpkins. I planted *one* plant in the spring.
> It has taken over my little veggie patch, smothered pretty much
> everything but the mint, marched off across the flower bed, over the
> fence to the neighbor's garden. We will have a lot of pumpkins, and so
> will the neighbor.
> Roberta in D

Wow, you're a real pumpkin farmer. Just think if you had a whole row
of the suckers!
I probably shouldn't admit this, but I'm not much of a cook and don't
exactly know what to *do* with a whole pumpkin except carve a
jackolantern & toast the seeds. So I was pretty impressed with J*'s
description of
the delicious-sounding things she made from one!

Sherry

 
 
 

OT refrigerator cookie recipe

Post by J* » Wed, 19 Aug 2009 05:18:28


Sherry, autumn is prime pumpkin season.
if you like pumpkin pie at all, you'll probably also like other things made
with pumpkin.
all you need to do is make sure when  you buy a pumpkin that it is an eating
one.
sometimes those selling for jack'o'lanterns arent all that great for eating,
so do ask.

once you've got your hot little hands on it, get a really sharp strong big
enough knife and starting at the top near the stem cut thru and bring it
down the side to the bottom, then do the other side or cut again to get a
big wedge. you dont have to use the whole pumpkin on one day to cook. if you
only need a big wedge, put the rest in the fridge for the rest of the week,
it does keep ok. i do deseed it completely first tho, then into the fridge.
you can peel them but sometimes they have very tough skin. you can also
steam/boil/roast/bake them with skin on then easily slice that skin off. tho
i do eat the skin when we have it roasted with a sunday leg of pork/beef or
chicken. i like the skin that way.

now what would you like to try cooking? its cooked much like potatoes,
steam, boil, bake, roast, soup, pasta sauce, salad, any baking, cakes,
muffins, cookies. honestly it is a fantastic vegetable with pretty much
unlimited uses. tho it has its own distinct flavour it also works well with
many other flavours so go for it. works well with lots of different meats as
well.
so what is your favourite dish? i'd think pumpkin can probably be worked
into it somehow. tis really one of the most versatile vegetables and is
really underused by most of the usa. mostly just made into pies. how sad.
i loooooooooooove pumpkin.
your lucky to get it all year round in cans for baking or soup but fresh is
even better.
cant wait to read your reply.
j.

Quote:
"Sherry" wrote...

Wow, you're a real pumpkin farmer. Just think if you had a whole row
of the suckers!
I probably shouldn't admit this, but I'm not much of a cook and don't
exactly know what to *do* with a whole pumpkin except carve a
jackolantern & toast the seeds. So I was pretty impressed with J*'s
description of the delicious-sounding things she made from one!
Sherry
Quote:

> Wish I could send you pumpkins. I planted *one* plant in the spring.
> It has taken over my little veggie patch, smothered pretty much
> everything but the mint, marched off across the flower bed, over the
> fence to the neighbor's garden. We will have a lot of pumpkins, and so
> will the neighbor.
> Roberta in D

 
 
 

OT refrigerator cookie recipe

Post by J* » Wed, 19 Aug 2009 06:30:20


i cant wait to see your pix.
i admit i had to google that variety of pumpkin, not familiar with that one
here.
looks like a yummy one. i like that you dont have to peel it if pureeing
too.
why waste all the lovely skin, eh.
my garden has too much growing just to look so not enough room for the
eating things.
tho council did tell us last year that we cant grow veges if we want the
pool fencing as it is.
we want vege and a clothesline we have to put in more fencing just around
the pool itself.
now my yard is not big and you can see/hear all activity in the pool from
anywhere in the yard.
there are no hidden corners where you might be and someone elses uninvited
kid might drown in the pool.
ack! council in their infinite wisdom is idiotic sometimes.
so we took down the line(for the inspection anyhow) and said we'd not grow
vege again next year, yea right, like hell we wont.
not that we grow a lot of them but geez louise.
most that we do grow are in pots on the paving around the pool or in the
garden where we stand on the paving around the pool to tend them. they are
not in some hidden spot out of view. omg. idiotic they are for sure.
anyhow, cant wait  to see those pix. lovely colour the skin is too.
j.

Quote:
"Roberta" wrote...

I'm almost afraid to go out and count them. Trips to the compost
holder have become safaris through pumpkin jungle, although the
glorious huge gold flowers give me great pleasure. We've had plenty of
rain this summer, along with a decent amount of sun, obviously perfect
pumpkin weather. These are Hokkaidos. One beast is just right for a
pot of soup, and they don't have to be peeled if you plan to puree.
They make good pies too. And I like them roasted in the pan, along
with the meat, potatoes, etc. Might do a photo just for you tomorrow,
but the whole plant won't fit in one frame. The jungle is getting a
bit dim and creepy now as the sun is going down :-) But I do love
spotting the hedgehog, now and then. Oh, and the eldest pumpkin looks
just about ripe! I usually harvest whatever's left just before the
first frost, and they keep well for 2-3 months if cool.
Roberta in D



Quote:
>wow, that sounds amazing, do get some pix of it for posterity if nothing
>else.
>who would believe they'd get that big.
>must take a mess of water to keep up with all that growth too.
>what kind of pumpkin is it?
>pix, girl, i want pix of it.
>pumpkin is possibly my favourite vegetable, well along with tomatos.
>both are sooooo versatile.
>when do you harvest them in your neck of the woods?
>dh just asked what you're gonna do with all of them?
>he is the chef in our house....with suggestions from me that is.
>dont forget the chocolate pumpkin cake. the recipe i used only took a cup
>of
>pumpkin so easily done.
>j.

>"Roberta" wrote ...
>Wish I could send you pumpkins. I planted *one* plant in the spring.
>It has taken over my little veggie patch, smothered pretty much
>everything but the mint, marched off across the flower bed, over the
>fence to the neighbor's garden. We will have a lot of pumpkins, and so
>will the neighbor.
>Roberta in D

 
 
 

OT refrigerator cookie recipe

Post by Robert » Wed, 19 Aug 2009 20:50:06


They are the easiest things to grow -shoot, you can't stop them!
Easy pumpkin soup (very flexible recipe): Open a Hokkaido, scoop out
the seeds, chop into chunks. (Smaller chunks cook faster.) Chop a
large onion (or a leek), garlic if you want. Fry in a little butter or
oil until soft but not brown. Add a liter (quart) of chicken broth or
water and the pumpkin. (Sometimes I add some chopped ginger.) Simmer
until tender. Let cool a little, then puree. (I use a staff blender.)
Taste it. Add whatever you think it needs: pepper, bit of salt,
chives, parsley, a cup of cream, bacon bits.....
Roberta in D



Quote:

>> Wish I could send you pumpkins. I planted *one* plant in the spring.
>> It has taken over my little veggie patch, smothered pretty much
>> everything but the mint, marched off across the flower bed, over the
>> fence to the neighbor's garden. We will have a lot of pumpkins, and so
>> will the neighbor.
>> Roberta in D

>Wow, you're a real pumpkin farmer. Just think if you had a whole row
>of the suckers!
>I probably shouldn't admit this, but I'm not much of a cook and don't
>exactly know what to *do* with a whole pumpkin except carve a
>jackolantern & toast the seeds. So I was pretty impressed with J*'s
>description of
>the delicious-sounding things she made from one!

>Sherry

 
 
 

OT refrigerator cookie recipe

Post by Sherr » Wed, 19 Aug 2009 23:31:18



Quote:
> They are the easiest things to grow -shoot, you can't stop them!
> Easy pumpkin soup (very flexible recipe): Open a Hokkaido, scoop out
> the seeds, chop into chunks. (Smaller chunks cook faster.) Chop a
> large onion (or a leek), garlic if you want. Fry in a little butter or
> oil until soft but not brown. Add a liter (quart) of chicken broth or
> water and the pumpkin. (Sometimes I add some chopped ginger.) Simmer
> until tender. Let cool a little, then puree. (I use a staff blender.)
> Taste it. Add whatever you think it needs: pepper, bit of salt,
> chives, parsley, a cup of cream, bacon bits.....
> Roberta in D

Well, yum! I can do that!
This is kind of unappetizing tip to put right below your delicious
one, but I do
know that soft, cooked pumpkin is very good for a constipated cat or
dog. (thought
I'd throw that in, since many of us have QI's)

Sherry

 
 
 

OT refrigerator cookie recipe

Post by Robert » Wed, 19 Aug 2009 23:37:19


Remembering the turmeric thread, you could add a bit of curry
seasoning to the soup and use a can of coconut milk instead of cream.
Roberta in D, time to start cooking pumpkins!



Quote:

>> They are the easiest things to grow -shoot, you can't stop them!
>> Easy pumpkin soup (very flexible recipe): Open a Hokkaido, scoop out
>> the seeds, chop into chunks. (Smaller chunks cook faster.) Chop a
>> large onion (or a leek), garlic if you want. Fry in a little butter or
>> oil until soft but not brown. Add a liter (quart) of chicken broth or
>> water and the pumpkin. (Sometimes I add some chopped ginger.) Simmer
>> until tender. Let cool a little, then puree. (I use a staff blender.)
>> Taste it. Add whatever you think it needs: pepper, bit of salt,
>> chives, parsley, a cup of cream, bacon bits.....
>> Roberta in D

>Well, yum! I can do that!
>This is kind of unappetizing tip to put right below your delicious
>one, but I do
>know that soft, cooked pumpkin is very good for a constipated cat or
>dog. (thought
>I'd throw that in, since many of us have QI's)

>Sherry

 
 
 

OT refrigerator cookie recipe

Post by Sherr » Wed, 19 Aug 2009 23:39:27



Quote:
> Sherry, autumn is prime pumpkin season.
> if you like pumpkin pie at all, you'll probably also like other things made
> with pumpkin.
> all you need to do is make sure when ?you buy a pumpkin that it is an eating
> one.
> sometimes those selling for jack'o'lanterns arent all that great for eating,
> so do ask.

Well, that's the *first* thing I've done wrong -- I've never bought an
eating
pumpkin. I assume that's the small ones?
I am curious too -- what part of the US do you live in? I think what
we're
accustomed to eating is largely regional. Pumpkin pie is about all I
remember ever having out of a pumpkin (BTW, sweet potato pie is
a wonderful facsimile of pumpkin pie!). And lamb is practically
unheard of
here. You might see chops in the larger grocery stores in the city,
but
not around here.
But Ido love the flavor of pumpkin -- there's an awesome recipe for
pumpkin
cookies I love too.
As far as your question about food, I mostly am kind of food "purist".
I usually
like minimal seasonings and basic preparation. Steamed or baked sounds
good to me. :-)
Sherry
Quote:
> once you've got your hot little hands on it, get a really sharp strong big
> enough knife and starting at the top near the stem cut thru and bring it
> down the side to the bottom, then do the other side or cut again to get a
> big wedge. you dont have to use the whole pumpkin on one day to cook. if you
> only need a big wedge, put the rest in the fridge for the rest of the week,
> it does keep ok. i do deseed it completely first tho, then into the fridge.
> you can peel them but sometimes they have very tough skin. you can also
> steam/boil/roast/bake them with skin on then easily slice that skin off. tho
> i do eat the skin when we have it roasted with a sunday leg of pork/beef or
> chicken. i like the skin that way.

> now what would you like to try cooking? its cooked much like potatoes,
> steam, boil, bake, roast, soup, pasta sauce, salad, any baking, cakes,
> muffins, cookies. honestly it is a fantastic vegetable with pretty much
> unlimited uses. tho it has its own distinct flavour it also works well with
> many other flavours so go for it. works well with lots of different meats as
> well.
> so what is your favourite dish? i'd think pumpkin can probably be worked
> into it somehow. tis really one of the most versatile vegetables and is
> really underused by most of the usa. mostly just made into pies. how sad.
> i loooooooooooove pumpkin.
> your lucky to get it all year round in cans for baking or soup but fresh is
> even better.
> cant wait to read your reply.
> j.

> "Sherry" wrote...

> Wow, you're a real pumpkin farmer. Just think if you had a whole row
> of the suckers!
> I probably shouldn't admit this, but I'm not much of a cook and don't
> exactly know what to *do* with a whole pumpkin except carve a
> jackolantern & toast the seeds. So I was pretty impressed with J*'s
> description of the delicious-sounding things she made from one!
> Sherry


> > Wish I could send you pumpkins. I planted *one* plant in the spring.
> > It has taken over my little veggie patch, smothered pretty much
> > everything but the mint, marched off across the flower bed, over the
> > fence to the neighbor's garden. We will have a lot of pumpkins, and so
> > will the neighbor.
> > Roberta in D- Hide quoted text -

> - Show quoted text -