A wonderful day ( a bit long)

A wonderful day ( a bit long)

Post by David Lewi » Thu, 19 Aug 1999 04:00:00



Today I went to a meeting of the British Quilt Heritage group.  We met
at an Elizabethan (that is, 16th century) great house about 4 miles from
my home.  There were 25 of us.

Gawthorpe Hall is the home of the Rachel Kaye-Shuttleworth collection.
Rachel collected all kinds of needlework from all over the world and the
house continues tp do the same.  They will accept anything and love
UFOs.

So we saw about a third of the quilts they have.  Most were 18th and
19th century, and many had all their provenance attached.

But there were three that astounded me.  One was a soldier's quilt, made
by a soldier, in hospital, in Hong Kong in the 1880s, from the uniforms
of officers who had been killed.  The colours were bright and the fabric
was very thick: can't imagine what his fingers were like when he
finished: it was composed of half-inch squares!

Then there were two very old quilts, one dating back to 1700,
beautifully embroidered and quilted in the tiniest stitches you can
imagine.  And the last one, a whole cloth, very fragile, from 1703.  And
that had been made about a mile down the road from where we were
sitting.

Apart from the last one, we were invited to touch and handle all teh
quilts, to inspect them thoroughly, turn them over, anything in fact!

What a day.  What with the quilts, meeting previously unmet Internet
friends from BQL, the house, the collection,  it was something I'll
always remember.
--
Marie

 
 
 

A wonderful day ( a bit long)

Post by Suzie or Paul Beckwi » Sat, 21 Aug 1999 04:00:00


On Wed, 18 Aug 1999 22:07:26 +0100, David Lewis

Quote:

>Gawthorpe Hall is the home of the Rachel Kaye-Shuttleworth collection.
>Rachel collected all kinds of needlework from all over the world and the
>house continues tp do the same.  They will accept anything and love
>UFOs.

>But there were three that astounded me.  One was a soldier's quilt, made
>by a soldier, in hospital, in Hong Kong in the 1880s, from the uniforms
>of officers who had been killed.  The colours were bright and the fabric
>was very thick: can't imagine what his fingers were like when he
>finished: it was composed of half-inch squares!

(snipped a bit here and there)

A REAL soldiers quilt?! Gee Marie - we have to meet up and you take me
and Paul to see that one y'hear!

'cos he is currently making a soldiers quilt from the uniform wools
from all the units in the Napoleonic Association (photo WILL appear on
website eventually)

Suzie B
--
Southend, UK
"You can always tell a quilter by the thread she wears..."
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