Newbie needs help with new iron

Newbie needs help with new iron

Post by Liz » Sun, 20 Aug 2000 04:00:00



Help! My iron has died and my DH has told me to get what I need. He wants
one with a shiny metal surface (yes, he does his own ironing !), but other
than that he doesn't care what I get. The problem is that I don't know what
I need. Both irons I have owned were gifts from someone, so I have never
bought one. I am new to quilting, but I have quickly learned that ironing is
very important. I have started learning applique. I keep reading tips that
say use a sharp pointed iron or a large iron. What I need to know is what do
you really like about the iron you have or wish you had. Does it really make
a difference what brand I buy?
Thanks
Liz in NC
 
 
 

Newbie needs help with new iron

Post by Kathy Appleba » Sun, 20 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

>  What I need to know is what do
> you really like about the iron you have or wish you had. Does it really make
> a difference what brand I buy?

I'm certainly not an ironing expert, but I did some research last year
when DH was trying to push me to get a "better" iron.

What I found was that the major difference between irons, other than
things like the quality of the components, is the amount of steam, the
weight, and the consistency of the temperature. You want a lot of steam,
as heavy as you can manage (the weight is what does the work), and a
consistent temperature.

At home I have a Black & Decker (about 10 years old) that I decided not
to replace, since I was basically happy with it. So when I needed an
iron for work, I went with another B&D, and I'm very *unhappy* with that
one. It leaks, doesn't provide enough steam, and shuts itself off all
the time (it actually is supposed to do that, but I don't like it.) I'm
toying with the idea of replacing it with a professional Rowenta, but
I'm not quite irritated enough to do so.

Good luck, and let us know what you choose!
--
Kathy Applebaum
Kayney Quilting (longarm machine quilting)


 
 
 

Newbie needs help with new iron

Post by MeginOreg » Sun, 20 Aug 2000 04:00:00


The automatic shut-off feature on irons seems to be something that you either
love, or hate.  I have a Rowenta Professional ($70 at Costco several years ago)
with the auto-shut-off.  I'm not sure if all the Professional models have this
or not.  I love the feature.  I can plug in the iron when I start working, and
if I'm interrupted (which I am a LOT) I can go off and leave it without
worrying.  It heats back up again very quickly, so it's not annoying to me when
it shuts off.

-- Meg in Oregon

Quote:
>At home I have a Black & Decker (about 10 years old) that I decided not
>to replace, since I was basically happy with it. So when I needed an
>iron for work, I went with another B&D, and I'm very *unhappy* with that
>one. It leaks, doesn't provide enough steam, and shuts itself off all
>the time (it actually is supposed to do that, but I don't like it.) I'm
>toying with the idea of replacing it with a professional Rowenta, but
>I'm not quite irritated enough to do so.

>Good luck, and let us know what you choose!
>--
>Kathy Applebaum

 
 
 

Newbie needs help with new iron

Post by Deena Well » Sun, 20 Aug 2000 04:00:00


I bought a Rowenta for about $49.99 at JoAnn's.  It has a
dark metal bottom which won't get nicked up by pins, etc.,
so I like it a lot, and even if it's not shiny I think your
DH will approve.  It's steam, but lets you turn the steam
off.  It does not automatically turn itself off, which is
important for a quilter who often turns away to the machine
only to come back in 5 minutes to press again.  I think it's
pointed enough to handle my applique (at least I have no
complaints about it), and with water in the reservoir it's
heavy enough to please me and light enough not to fatigue
me.  I'm happy, in a way I haven't been since I started
quilting.  I always settled for Black & Decker Wal-Mart
irons before, and I doubt if I would go back.  The extra $20
spent was well worth it in my opinion.

Deena in Florida


Quote:
> Help! My iron has died and my DH has told me to get what I
need. He wants
> one with a shiny metal surface (yes, he does his own

ironing !), but other
Quote:
> than that he doesn't care what I get. The problem is that
I don't know what
> I need. Both irons I have owned were gifts from someone,
so I have never
> bought one. I am new to quilting, but I have quickly

learned that ironing is
Quote:
> very important. I have started learning applique. I keep
reading tips that
> say use a sharp pointed iron or a large iron. What I need
to know is what do
> you really like about the iron you have or wish you had.
Does it really make
> a difference what brand I buy?
> Thanks
> Liz in NC

 
 
 

Newbie needs help with new iron

Post by Scott Willia » Sun, 20 Aug 2000 04:00:00


I have a Norelco E-Z Steam Auto-Off. It was very cheap (less than 20
dollars) and I love it for sewing. The auto-off is a feature I like when
sewing as I can plug in the iron and leave it plugged in for the day.
You only have to move the iron to turn it back on. But for ironing I lke
to use my old General Mills iron  it has a steam attachment and it gets
hotter than the new irons. Scott in Fresno Ca
 
 
 

Newbie needs help with new iron

Post by Elliso » Mon, 21 Aug 2000 14:29:17


Howdy!
  I'm w/ you on the cheap iron, Scott.
I don't like all that dad-gummed
spitting and fuming steam irons do, tho'.   Got a
cheap, gets-very-hot iron (w/ auto shut-off,
jiggle-it-on feature), and a spray bottle of water.
   And the rest of the $$ goes for fabric.
To iron.   Someday.
--
Ragmop

Quote:
> I have a Norelco E-Z Steam Auto-Off. It was very cheap (less than 20
> dollars) and I love it for sewing. The auto-off is a feature I like when
> sewing as I can plug in the iron and leave it plugged in for the day.
> You only have to move the iron to turn it back on. But for ironing I lke
> to use my old General Mills iron  it has a steam attachment and it gets
> hotter than the new irons. Scott in Fresno Ca

 
 
 

Newbie needs help with new iron

Post by Gary Flin » Mon, 21 Aug 2000 04:00:00


The irons were off the market for a couple of years, but now Philips (formerly
Norelco) irons are back in the American marketplace at Target stores. Outside
the USA, Philips irons are widely available, especially in Canada.



Quote:

>I have a Norelco E-Z Steam Auto-Off. It was very cheap (less than 20
>dollars) and I love it for sewing. The auto-off is a feature I like when
>sewing as I can plug in the iron and leave it plugged in for the day.
>You only have to move the iron to turn it back on. But for ironing I lke
>to use my old General Mills iron  it has a steam attachment and it gets
>hotter than the new irons. Scott in Fresno Ca

 
 
 

Newbie needs help with new iron

Post by CANDCMO » Tue, 22 Aug 2000 04:00:00


IMHO they have yet to make a great quilter's iron.  I hate the auto shut off on
the Rowenta.  Nice feature BUT as we quilter's have been known to leave the
iron all day, using in spurts, this actually causes the iron to burn out and it
leaks when just sitting their with it's little yellow (evil) lite blinking at
me.  I paid well over $100 for my professional model (on sale, mind u) and it
stopped heating up 2 weeks prior to warranty being up.  Luckily it was still
covered but I had to send it away - few places they authorize for repair - and
it took about 4 weeks to get it back. Meantime I had to go out & buy a cheap
temporary iron but none that were available had all the features I wanted.  I
love the Rowenta for the steam and weight but for the price find it lacking in
livespan.  Don't know what I'll do when this one goes. I head Bernina makes one
but have never seen it anywhere.
 
 
 

Newbie needs help with new iron

Post by Pat Winter » Tue, 22 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Hi All!

Am I looking in vain for a NON Steam Iron??? Sure, I can use
a Steam Iron without water, but the sole plate would still
have vents. I want a flat sole plate with out vents. I
prefer to apply water with a spray bottle. I often use
fusible products and a solid sole plate would be more
efficient and effective for fusing, IMO.

So, has anyone a source for a DRY IRON? (For the 'Gen-Xer's:
they were available when I was a girl in the 60s.)

TIA, PAT in ***ia

 
 
 

Newbie needs help with new iron

Post by Lorilynn Kin » Tue, 22 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Hmmmm.  Maybe finding one at a yard sale is your best bet....  Do they
even make "non-steam" irons any more?

--
Lori in Colorado
http://www.FoundCollection.com/~lsquared/

My idea of housework is to sweep the room with a glance.

Quote:

> Hi All!

> Am I looking in vain for a NON Steam Iron??? Sure, I can use
> a Steam Iron without water, but the sole plate would still
> have vents. I want a flat sole plate with out vents. I
> prefer to apply water with a spray bottle. I often use
> fusible products and a solid sole plate would be more
> efficient and effective for fusing, IMO.

> So, has anyone a source for a DRY IRON? (For the 'Gen-Xer's:
> they were available when I was a girl in the 60s.)

> TIA, PAT in ***ia

 
 
 

Newbie needs help with new iron

Post by Butterfl » Tue, 22 Aug 2000 04:00:00


I just got one from the viking Dealer that fixed my Sm. It was less than
$20.00 and made by Proctor Silex. It isn't as heavy as the Rowenta but
it has the flat bottom.
Butterfly
Quote:

> Hi All!

> Am I looking in vain for a NON Steam Iron??? Sure, I can use
> a Steam Iron without water, but the sole plate would still
> have vents. I want a flat sole plate with out vents. I
> prefer to apply water with a spray bottle. I often use
> fusible products and a solid sole plate would be more
> efficient and effective for fusing, IMO.

> So, has anyone a source for a DRY IRON? (For the 'Gen-Xer's:
> they were available when I was a girl in the 60s.)

> TIA, PAT in ***ia

 
 
 

Newbie needs help with new iron

Post by Kath » Tue, 22 Aug 2000 04:00:00


I bought an old GE for $1. at a junk store.

Quote:

> Hi All!

> Am I looking in vain for a NON Steam Iron??? Sure, I can use
> a Steam Iron without water, but the sole plate would still
> have vents. I want a flat sole plate with out vents. I
> prefer to apply water with a spray bottle. I often use
> fusible products and a solid sole plate would be more
> efficient and effective for fusing, IMO.

> So, has anyone a source for a DRY IRON? (For the 'Gen-Xer's:
> they were available when I was a girl in the 60s.)

> TIA, PAT in ***ia

--

"Families are like quilts: lives pieced together, stitched with smiles
and tears, colored with memories, bound with LOVE."
 
 
 

Newbie needs help with new iron

Post by Smee » Tue, 22 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

> Hi All!

> Am I looking in vain for a NON Steam Iron??? Sure, I can use
> a Steam Iron without water, but the sole plate would still
> have vents. I want a flat sole plate with out vents. I
> prefer to apply water with a spray bottle. I often use
> fusible products and a solid sole plate would be more
> efficient and effective for fusing, IMO.

> So, has anyone a source for a DRY IRON? (For the 'Gen-Xer's:
> they were available when I was a girl in the 60s.)

> TIA, PAT in ***ia

What about a travel iron. Aren't most of them non-steam??

Smee

 
 
 

Newbie needs help with new iron

Post by Jon » Tue, 22 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Hi, Pat

My steam iron was sooo heavy and the steam holes would
keep catching on the points of the blocks, so I went
shopping for another one.  I bought a PROCTOR-SILEX and
took it back,'cause it didn't get hot enough and the
sole-plate was not slick.  Then I was walking down
the sale isle at Wal-mart on day, and on the shelf
was a B&Decker 'quick 'n easy' no.460 for $15.

Needless to say, it came home with me.  I LUV it.  It is
not so heavy, gets HOT real quick, and has auto. shut-off.

The steam vents have not been a problem.  I don't put
water in it, I just keep the spray bottle handy.

Hugs, and happy stitchin
Jon in Oklahoma

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