new to quilting and need advice,,,,please

new to quilting and need advice,,,,please

Post by Belinda Bat » Sun, 06 Feb 2005 07:48:23



hello everyone,,,,
the question i have is probably silly but being new to quilting i have
found that no matter what the problem is there is a answer.
i was on a search for a simple quilt to start with and found the
(tumbler) quilt design. thinking it would be fairly easy because how
hard can it be to sew a one patch quilt together.
i was wrong,,,,,,
after i started sewing the pieces together i found that no matter what i
did i couldn't get them to line up right. i have tried everything that i
know to do. no matter how i do this the pieces have highs and lows and
are not even.can anyone give me some advice as to what i am doing wrong
pleasee

frustrated beginner
belinda

http://community.webtv.net/bbates1/InHimWeTrust

 
 
 

new to quilting and need advice,,,,please

Post by smudge in o » Sun, 06 Feb 2005 08:15:46


Hi Belinda
Are you piecing by hand or machine? If by hand, you will have traced
the finished size, then added seam allowances (1/4"). You will notice
on the "slanty" sides that you need to match the seamline "corners",
not the outside edge of the corners. You will have little "ears"
*** over, but when you open up the joined pieces, you should have a
straight edge across the seam

If you are machine piecing, you will need to make sure you are lining
up these sides in a similar way. I think I usually do a kind of
audition by pinning on the seamline then opening out to make sure the
edges line up.

Probably as clear as mud, and there are likely to be others on this
list who can explain it better...
Smudge

 
 
 

new to quilting and need advice,,,,please

Post by Belinda Bat » Sun, 06 Feb 2005 08:31:40


thanks so much,,,,,im machine piecing and will definatly try your
advice..
thanx again
belinda

http://community.webtv.net/bbates1/InHimWeTrust

 
 
 

new to quilting and need advice,,,,please

Post by froo » Sun, 06 Feb 2005 10:10:13


Well, for machine piecing, I would recommend a design that has straight
on-grain edges, like squares and rectangles. The tumbling blocks pieces have
bias edges. Bias edges are very stretchy, and if they are pulled out of
shape, even a little, it will be very hard to get them to line up properly.

I've heard lots of silly questions, and this was not one of them. In my
house, silly questions run more along the line of "if a giraffe and an
anteater had a baby, would it have a longer nose or a longer neck?"

There may be questions that more experienced quilters have heard before, but
that's not enough to make it silly. Not in this group anyway! Welcome,
Belinda. Feel free to ask as many questions as you want, and just wait for
the answers to pour in!

--
Wendy
http://griffinsflight.com/Quilting/quilt1.htm
"I could *so* save the world if somebody handed me superpowers." - Dawn
Summers
De-Fang email address to reply


Quote:
> thanks so much,,,,,im machine piecing and will definatly try your
> advice..
> thanx again
> belinda

> http://community.webtv.net/bbates1/InHimWeTrust

 
 
 

new to quilting and need advice,,,,please

Post by Sandy Foste » Sun, 06 Feb 2005 11:00:46



Quote:

> Well, for machine piecing, I would recommend a design that has straight
> on-grain edges, like squares and rectangles. The tumbling blocks pieces have
> bias edges. Bias edges are very stretchy, and if they are pulled out of
> shape, even a little, it will be very hard to get them to line up properly.

Wendy is absolutely right here. Bias edges give some very interesting
blocks, but for a first quilt they can be tricky. I'd recommend putting
those pieces away temporarily and starting with something really
straight and easy, like a rail fence pattern. Do the tumbler quilt when
you've already gotten your feet wet. :)

Quote:
> I've heard lots of silly questions, and this was not one of them. In my
> house, silly questions run more along the line of "if a giraffe and an
> anteater had a baby, would it have a longer nose or a longer neck?"

The silliest question is the one you don't ask for fear of sounding
silly. ;) After all, if you don't ask, how will you learn? Ask away! We
have lots of experienced quilters here, lots of newbies, and lots of
"in-betweeners". And we *all* have questions at some point!

Now for the questionnaire! <g> Do you have QIs? What sort of chocolate
do you like? What got you started quilting?
--
Sandy in Henderson, near Las Vegas
my ISP is earthlink.net -- put sfoster1(at) in front
http://home.earthlink.net/~sfoster1

AKA Dame Sandy, Minister of Education

 
 
 

new to quilting and need advice,,,,please

Post by Patt » Sun, 06 Feb 2005 17:47:21


Hullo Belinda and welcome
You have already had some great advice.
The tumbling blocks pattern was never really intended for machine
piecing.  That is not to say that it can't be done, but it is more
difficult.  The original way is to hand piece it with the diamonds
folded and sewn round pieces of thickish paper or thin card (well, they
used anything really). These are then whip-stitched together.  This
takes care of all the distortion that can occur using pieces with off
the grain line edges.
I certainly endorse the advice to start with something that can be cut
on the grain.  Just look for a pattern which has no triangles, diamonds
or anything like that - for a start.
If you are adamant about doing your tumbling blocks *now* and not
leaving it aside for a little while, try spray starching the pieces -
that usually helps.  And do be sure to sew only from seamline corner to
seamline corner *NOT* from edge of the fabric to edge of the fabric.
This really is not an easy pattern to start with though, and I'd hate
for you to become discouraged with the whole quilting adventure.
.


Quote:
>hello everyone,,,,
>the question i have is probably silly but being new to quilting i have
>found that no matter what the problem is there is a answer.
>i was on a search for a simple quilt to start with and found the
>(tumbler) quilt design. thinking it would be fairly easy because how
>hard can it be to sew a one patch quilt together.
>i was wrong,,,,,,
>after i started sewing the pieces together i found that no matter what i
>did i couldn't get them to line up right. i have tried everything that i
>know to do. no matter how i do this the pieces have highs and lows and
>are not even.can anyone give me some advice as to what i am doing wrong
>pleasee

>frustrated beginner
>belinda

>http://community.webtv.net/bbates1/InHimWeTrust

--
Best Regards
pat on the hill
 
 
 

new to quilting and need advice,,,,please

Post by Roberta Zollne » Sun, 06 Feb 2005 19:18:33


Welcome Belinda!
Do you mean the tumbling blocks made up of 3 diamond shapes? Or is this
tumbler the one with the 2 concave and 2 convex curves?
I mostly agree with the advice to start learning on something simpler, but
if this is the design that really makes your heart sing, then go ahead! Just
be prepared to practice a lot, and to have the machine piecing go almost as
slowly as hand piecing.
Roberta in D



Quote:
> hello everyone,,,,
> the question i have is probably silly but being new to quilting i have
> found that no matter what the problem is there is a answer.
> i was on a search for a simple quilt to start with and found the
> (tumbler) quilt design. thinking it would be fairly easy because how
> hard can it be to sew a one patch quilt together.
> i was wrong,,,,,,
> after i started sewing the pieces together i found that no matter what i
> did i couldn't get them to line up right. i have tried everything that i
> know to do. no matter how i do this the pieces have highs and lows and
> are not even.can anyone give me some advice as to what i am doing wrong
> pleasee

> frustrated beginner
> belinda

> http://community.webtv.net/bbates1/InHimWeTrust

 
 
 

new to quilting and need advice,,,,please

Post by Tina » Sun, 06 Feb 2005 23:42:03


Hi Belinda!  I'm relatively new too!  I thought I was adventurous, WOW,
you've definitely got me beat.

My first quilt was just squares.  100 squares, many with photos on
them.  I thought it was kind of childish and simple at first, but it
was a lot of work and once it was all sandwiched and sewn, I realized
that simple or not, it was a really cool quilt!  Then when my mom
received it, I was so proud of how amazed she was.  To her, it was an
enormous amount of work and creativity and she adores it.

BANG!  I was hooked.  So, I thought - I can do this.  I love this
quilting stuff and I want to do it all!  The quilts (2) I already own
(hand-me-downs, wonderful) have star patterns and every quilt I have
ever looked at and wished I could make had star patterns.  So I started
looking at star patterns and thought they looked so difficult and
complicated that I would never be able to do them.  So I picked a
really easy one for my first one.  A sawtooth star.  It was VERY easy
and when it was done, I thought WOW, that is so cool!  It even looks
good!  LOL

Then I got more adventurous and tried an even more complicated star - a
Dutch Rose - that had a gazillion little pieces to it.  I survived and
the block is really pretty, but it was a tad overwhelming.

I decided to plan a quilt for my mother-in-law and I wanted to use a
star pattern.  I found a star that I absolutely loved - Diamond Star -
and I thought, well that will be so plain and elementary that this will
really look like a beginner quilt.  (I really want to impress with this
one!)  But I made the first block and the star turned out so pretty
(and so easy) that I realized, the quilting enjoyment isn't just about
how difficult the block is - it's about picking the fabrics to go
together, choosing the block pattern and of course sewing them, but
then also being able to put them together with sashings and bindings
etc.  The more I looked at those Diamond Star blocks as I have
completed them and my pattern that I have now drawn out and colored in
as a guide - the more I realized - this quilt will look no less
"professional" or advanced than many I have seen in quilt shops and
that's not even the point.  This quilt will be beautiful and
appreciated because it was made specifically for someone I love, by
someone she loves.

I guess my point is, don't try to overwhelm yourself with something
that frustrates you immensely right off the bat.  Or even, just make
the tumbling blocks as a small wall*** or something you can put in
a window box frame and hang as your first practice piece until you
really feel confident about it.  Pick something that's easy and fun to
work on while you can set the tumbling blocks aside so that you have
something you can start and finish quickly that will give you immediate
"atta girl" gratification of quilting!  LOL  Then you will be even that
much more bolstered to pick the tumbling blocks back up - and not be
frustrated - and amazingly, it will seem so easy and they will just
come together.

miniscule advice from the other beginner,
Tina

 
 
 

new to quilting and need advice,,,,please

Post by Julia in M » Mon, 07 Feb 2005 01:23:47


Quote:

> Hullo Belinda and welcome
> You have already had some great advice.
> The tumbling blocks pattern was never really intended for machine
> piecing.  

Belinda said she is doing a tumbler pattern. That is not the same as
tumbling blocks. I think the one she means is a trapezoid shape, like this:
     _
    /_\

This is pretty easy to do by machine. You sew them in rows with the
slanted sides together, like this:
     _ _ _ _
    /_\_/_\_/

Then sew the rows together. The tricky part of this is getting the
straight edges lined up, because you have to match the stitching lines,
not the raw edges.

A lot of tumbler quilts are scrappy, but here's a web site that shows a
flag made out of tumbler blocks; it is toward the bottom of the page.
http://www.zianet.com/breynold/tessel/tessel.html

Julia in MN
--
This message has been scanned for viruses by Norton Anti-Virus

http://webpages.charter.net/jaccola/

 
 
 

new to quilting and need advice,,,,please

Post by Patt » Mon, 07 Feb 2005 01:59:57


Oh! Sorry Julia and Belinda - someone else mentioned Tumbling blocks,,
so I just continued without checking.
Thanks for putting me right.
.


Quote:

>> Hullo Belinda and welcome
>> You have already had some great advice.
>> The tumbling blocks pattern was never really intended for machine
>>piecing.
>Belinda said she is doing a tumbler pattern. That is not the same as
>tumbling blocks. I think the one she means is a trapezoid shape, like
>this:
>    _
>   /_\

>This is pretty easy to do by machine. You sew them in rows with the
>slanted sides together, like this:
>    _ _ _ _
>   /_\_/_\_/

>Then sew the rows together. The tricky part of this is getting the
>straight edges lined up, because you have to match the stitching lines,
>not the raw edges.

>A lot of tumbler quilts are scrappy, but here's a web site that shows a
>flag made out of tumbler blocks; it is toward the bottom of the page.
>http://www.zianet.com/breynold/tessel/tessel.html

>Julia in MN

--
Best Regards
pat on the hill
 
 
 

new to quilting and need advice,,,,please

Post by Belinda Bat » Mon, 07 Feb 2005 00:32:03


thank you sandy,,,im not sure what QIs are.i lie any kind of
chocolate..i come from a big family and was blessed in that i grew up
around my grandmother and great grandparents.they are all from the south
and taught or (tried) to teach me what they knew.
i learned to cross-stitch,embrodry,crochet,indan beadwork, all by my
them.when they all passed i was going thru some things and found a quilt
my grandmother had made me when i was 13. now it is 30 years old. that
was my biggest inspiration too quilt. i am bound and determined to learn
this also. im thankfull there is a group of ppl here tha is willing to
help.
thanx
belinda

http://community.webtv.net/bbates1/InHimWeTrust

 
 
 

new to quilting and need advice,,,,please

Post by Belinda Bat » Mon, 07 Feb 2005 00:20:27


thanx wendy,,,i  know what you mean by the silly ????. my youngest son
was full of them.it was always interesting in our home to hear what kind
of ? he was going to ask next.
belinda

http://community.webtv.net/bbates1/InHimWeTrust

 
 
 

new to quilting and need advice,,,,please

Post by Belinda Bat » Tue, 08 Feb 2005 00:13:17


hello tina,
you are so right,,,,for some reason this tumbler one patch,other one
patches and optical illusion quilt designs are what i seem to really be
interested in. when i look at the magazines and the internet they seem
to just grab my attention. i like your idea of doing just a small piece
and framing it. i think it will give me a lot of encouragament and give
a goal to work toward.
thanx so much for the advice,
belinda

http://community.webtv.net/bbates1/InHimWeTrust

 
 
 

new to quilting and need advice,,,,please

Post by Tina » Tue, 08 Feb 2005 01:47:58


You are so welcome Belinda.  I know exactly what you mean.  My ultimate
love (and goal) is a Lone Star or Star of Bethleham.  But I just know,
as obsessed as I am with quilting, it wouldn't be something I couldn't
do quickly right now and I would just end up frustrated.  But I want
that quilt SOOOOoooo Bad! LOL  So, I'm working on the little star
blocks and improving my skills so that hopefully by the end of this
year (my first quilting year) I will be in a place where I can start on
that Lone Star and not overwhelm myself!  :-)

Good luck and happy quilting,
Tina

 
 
 

new to quilting and need advice,,,,please

Post by DrQuilte » Tue, 08 Feb 2005 10:28:20


well, you were wrong in thinking that the tumbling blocks was an easy
pattern. not only they are triangles, with a lot of bias and ergo
stretch, but also you have inset seams. are you piecing by hand or
machine? easy patterns for beginners are those that involve only squares
or rectangles: 4 patch, 9 patch, rail fence, log cabin. having said
that, my second quilt was a lone star wall***.....

Quote:

> hello everyone,,,,
> the question i have is probably silly but being new to quilting i have
> found that no matter what the problem is there is a answer.
> i was on a search for a simple quilt to start with and found the
> (tumbler) quilt design. thinking it would be fairly easy because how
> hard can it be to sew a one patch quilt together.
> i was wrong,,,,,,
> after i started sewing the pieces together i found that no matter what i
> did i couldn't get them to line up right. i have tried everything that i
> know to do. no matter how i do this the pieces have highs and lows and
> are not even.can anyone give me some advice as to what i am doing wrong
> pleasee

> frustrated beginner
> belinda

> http://www.FoundCollection.com/

--
Dr. Quilter
http://www.FoundCollection.com/
(take the dog out before replying)