applique: need to turn under edge?

applique: need to turn under edge?

Post by Olga » Thu, 06 Feb 1997 04:00:00



The hardest part of applique is turning under the edge so that small
points look good.  Recently someone told me that she never turned under
the edges.  she said that after using a fusible bonding material to attach
the applique, she either used a buttonhole stitch around the edges or some
other stitch.
So, doesn't the edge look ragged if you do that?  Or, maybe it might look
good until you have to wash your quilt.  Obviously, if this method works
all of your appliqued pieces will look much more precise, plus it would
take much less time.  Has anyone out there had success not turning under
edges?
Thanks,
Olga

 
 
 

applique: need to turn under edge?

Post by Mary Yoh » Fri, 07 Feb 1997 04:00:00


Quote:
> The hardest part of applique is turning under the edge so that small
> points look good.  Recently someone told me that she never turned under
> the edges.  she said that after using a fusible bonding material to attach
> the applique, she either used a buttonhole stitch around the edges or some
> other stitch.
> So, doesn't the edge look ragged if you do that?  Or, maybe it might look
> good until you have to wash your quilt.  Obviously, if this method works
> all of your appliqued pieces will look much more precise, plus it would
> take much less time.  Has anyone out there had success not turning under
> edges?

I don't think I'd like to hand-stitch through a fused applique; however,
Harriet Hargrave in her book on Machine Applique describes this technique
using a machine buttonhole stitch.  This type of applique is not as hardy
as turned-under edges and cannot take a lot of machine washings and general
abuse.  There are no ragged edges to speak of because the fusible bonds the
threads at the edge to each other.  Another consideration is that the fusible
definitely changes the feel of the applique, making the fabric stiffer.  If
you want to try this technique, I would definitely recommend using Steam-a-Seam
as the fusible, as it has the softest hand and tightest bond of any fusible I
have tried so far (much better than Wonder Under or Heat'n'Bond Lite).  But I
would still sew it by machine; too tough on the hands.

There are a number of different methods for turning under seam allowances.
Have you tried them all?  There's likely to be one method that works better
for you than others, especially if there are multiples of the same shape.

Mary

 
 
 

applique: need to turn under edge?

Post by Dirk Gerbe » Fri, 07 Feb 1997 04:00:00


I personally think that you are talking about two different applique
methods. I know it is hard to let small points look good with the 'turning
under the edge method', but practice makes perfect and you really will end
up with a nice looking 'hand-made' work. Appliqueing with fusible bond, is
faster, but if you won't to make nice, small, even buttonhole stitches
around the edge, it will also take time, and the fusible web makes your
applique stiff. I like it for quick applique, with the machine. But I also
saw beautifull work applique with a buttonhole stitch without fusible web,
we call it Persian applique.

It is nice to try all the different methods (maybe by appliqueing little
hearts - it's almost Valentine), and then decide what's best for you.

happy quilting,

Lutgard



Quote:
> The hardest part of applique is turning under the edge so that small
> points look good.  Recently someone told me that she never turned under
> the edges.  she said that after using a fusible bonding material to
attach
> the applique, she either used a buttonhole stitch around the edges or
some
> other stitch.
> So, doesn't the edge look ragged if you do that?  Or, maybe it might look
> good until you have to wash your quilt.  Obviously, if this method works
> all of your appliqued pieces will look much more precise, plus it would
> take much less time.  Has anyone out there had success not turning under
> edges?
> Thanks,
> Olga

 
 
 

applique: need to turn under edge?

Post by Teri in » Sun, 09 Feb 1997 04:00:00


Maybe the original poster was talking about using fusable interfacing and
sewing the wrong side of the applique to the nonfusible side of the
interfacing. Cut a hole in the interfacing, trim sides and turn right side
out. When you iron it the fusing sticks to the wrong side of the fabric,
there are no raw edges and the small points turn very nicely. Sewing these
pieces on with a machine button hole stitch makes a very nice product.
Teri

 
 
 

applique: need to turn under edge?

Post by Willen » Mon, 10 Feb 1997 04:00:00


Sometimes I draw the design onto  white fabric softener sheets and sandwich
it to the right side of the chosen fabric and stitch on the line.  Make a
small slit in the dryer sheet and after clipping curves and corners and
turn right side out and press with a steam.  Then applique as usual.  If
you want turn it over and trim the excess after your block is completed.
It depends on the look I want and whether I will be machine or hand
quilting.  I love the dimensional look it gives on some projects.  Others I
use the more traditional freeze paper but I just don't have the patience
(and maybe the skill) for the needle turn method.  I found that when I used
these kind of shortcut that applique quickly became my favorite method.
I'm still not a big fan of fusible applique.  Maybe when the technology is
such that it has a nice washable bond and doesn't gum up my needle I'll
change my mind.

In Stitches,
Willene
Bentonville, Arkansas

 
 
 

applique: need to turn under edge?

Post by ver.. » Tue, 11 Feb 1997 04:00:00


Ellie Sienkiewicz has a wonderful small book - and I took her class using
it at the Great American Quilt Festival three years ago - which
demonstrates 12 different methods of applique on a heart***.  It was
great fun and I now have a handy visual reference anytime I need to
applique with each heart done with a different method.  The book is called
- I think - Twelve ways to applique or something very similar.  If you
love applique, this is a book you should have in your library - small,
softcover and inexpensive.  Verdi

P.S. I LOVE Willene's calling the freezer paper method "traditional."
Boy, does that make me feel old!  Freezer paper wasn't even "invented"
that many years ago and now it is traditional.  Good grief!