Help - I need help as a fledgling quilter!

Help - I need help as a fledgling quilter!

Post by Lane » Sun, 19 Oct 1997 04:00:00



I've just begun a simple quilt made of a patchwork of squares.

I have web-surfed and looked around for guidance but seem to need it at the
most basic level.

Help!

So...

I cut out standardised pieces of cloth of equivalent weight and finish to
each other.

I stitch around two sides, but have cut each square on a fold...

I'm expecting to fill the space in-between...

And how do the pieces get sewn together
Help

 
 
 

Help - I need help as a fledgling quilter!

Post by colleen gree » Sun, 19 Oct 1997 04:00:00


Before I got the quilting bug and the courage to attempt my first quilt
I was lucky enough to discover all the public tv shows (usually mornings
during the week and then again mornings on the weekends), along with
programs on TLC.  

The wonderful thing about quilting is it's a truly self-satisfying
craft.  Most all of the people I know that quilt are very
non-judgmental.  The more you experiment - the more  you will learn.

One other good source for information is the local technical colleges
and craft shops which almost always have course offerings available.

Don't be timid!  Go for it. . .

 
 
 

Help - I need help as a fledgling quilter!

Post by Kathy I. Morg » Sun, 19 Oct 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> I cut out standardised pieces of cloth of equivalent weight and finish to
> each other.

> I stitch around two sides, but have cut each square on a fold...

> I'm expecting to fill the space in-between...

The best beginning help is a class, but if you can't find a class near
you, then videos or TV programs are probably the next best. Also a good
reference book with good drawings is really indispensible.

It's much easier to sew the pieces together if you don't leave any
spaces to fill in later. In fact, much as I hate ripping, I would
probably "unsew" seams if that would avoid having to fill in holes.

The usual method is to lay out your squares into a pleasing arrangement,
then sew them together in pairs, then sew the pairs together, until you
have a bunch of rows. Then sew the rows together. That way, there are no
inset seams to deal with, only long straight seams. I'll try to draw it,
but I'm not very good at ASCII art.

---------  ---------  ---------
|   |   |  |   |   |  |   |   |
|   |   |  |   |   |  |   |   |
---------  ---------  ---------
then

-----------------  -----------------
|   |   |   |   |  |   |   |   |   |
|   |   |   |   |  |   |   |   |   |
-----------------  -----------------
and then

---------------------------------
|   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |
|   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |
---------------------------------

Until you have all the squares sewn into rows. Now sew one row to the
next until you have the quilt top done. For strong seams that don't make
huge lumps where they cross, we usually press the seams to one side in
opposite directions. That sounds clear as mud, so I'll try to draw the
wrong side where seams come together. I'll use O's for the back of the
fabric, and X's for the seam:

OOXOOO  Seam pressed to left
OOXOOO  
XXXXXX  row seam
OOOXOO
OOOXOO  seam pressed to right

Quote:

> And how do the pieces get sewn together

Once the top has been completely assembled, you need to layer together
the backing, batting, and top into a 3-layer sandwich. These are machine
or hand quilted together, and finally a binding is sewn around the
outside raw edges. There are a lot of different methods for doing this,
so you'll probably want some more feedback when you get to that stage.

Kathy in AK