OT - Camping! - back home

OT - Camping! - back home

Post by Johanna Gibso » Tue, 07 Jun 2005 06:10:54



        Hello folks!
        We had a sunny Friday, and a sunny Saturday... until a terrific
thunder and lightning storm hit us.  Wow!  Fairly spectacular, with
lightning flashes directly above us, ear-splitting thunder and
torrential rain.  Did I mention we had old-fashioned tents with metal
poles?  Hmm.  Interesting.  We all hid in our tents for about 2 hours
while it bucketed it down, then emerged like wary rabbits for dinner.
Good thing we'd already gone on a walk to the waterfall, because all
other activity was out!
        Anyway, today (Sunday) we built shelters in the woods, did tie-dying
and then tidied up the camp, downed tents and came home.  I already
have my second load of laundry in the wash, have my backpack unpacked
and put away, have had a shower and a cup of tea, and am now writing
out the course guidelines for an evening class I'll help teach this
autumn.  I'm covered in midge bites, but it's good to be home!

-- Jo in Scotland

 
 
 

OT - Camping! - back home

Post by Debi Matlac » Tue, 07 Jun 2005 09:58:25



Quote:
> Hello folks!
> We had a sunny Friday, and a sunny Saturday... until a terrific
> thunder and lightning storm hit us.  Wow!  Fairly spectacular, with
> lightning flashes directly above us, ear-splitting thunder and
> torrential rain.  Did I mention we had old-fashioned tents with metal
> poles?  Hmm.  Interesting.  We all hid in our tents for about 2 hours
> while it bucketed it down, then emerged like wary rabbits for dinner.
> Good thing we'd already gone on a walk to the waterfall, because all
> other activity was out!
> Anyway, today (Sunday) we built shelters in the woods, did tie-dying
> and then tidied up the camp, downed tents and came home.  I already
> have my second load of laundry in the wash, have my backpack unpacked
> and put away, have had a shower and a cup of tea, and am now writing
> out the course guidelines for an evening class I'll help teach this
> autumn.  I'm covered in midge bites, but it's good to be home!

> -- Jo in Scotland

That sounds like fun, Jo, except the thunderstorm part. I'm from Florida
though, we're used to that here. I haven't been camping in ages...
--
Debi

Ever stop to think, and forget to start again?

 
 
 

OT - Camping! - back home

Post by Polly Esthe » Tue, 07 Jun 2005 10:08:44


I have no idea what a midge is. When we were on vacation in the Tennessee
mountains last week, something bit me. "What was it?" asked DH.
    How would I know?
    I did not stay awake identifying anything that might take a bite of my
wrinkled old hide.
    Whether a boa constrictor or a tarantula, it itched like mad.
    I tried all the logical reliefs - and nothing helped.
    Totally wild and desperate - the *Bite* had gone from a tiny little pink
spot to an enormous whelp with sibling whelps appearing around it.
    I tried a ridiculous coat of something I'd read about in the newspapers.
Here in the usa it's called "Vick's Vaporub".  Contains, maybe, menthol,
turpentine and eucalyptus. Ordinarily, it would be helpful for a stuffy
nose.
    This was not an ordinary situation.
    Absolutely desperate (not to mention, borderline ***), I tried
rubbing the Vicks on the bite.
    Ahhh.  Peace.  Quiet.
    Smelling like the***ens but who cared?
    And just one more silly cure - sometimes painting the bites of vile
little critters with nail polish - clear, psychedelic puce or fire truck
red, no matter, - will put the bites to rest.
    Rest.
    Ah, yes.
    That is a good thing.  Polly

Quote:
> Hello folks!
> We had a sunny Friday, and a sunny Saturday... until a terrific
> thunder and lightning storm hit us.  Wow!  Fairly spectacular, with
> lightning flashes directly above us, ear-splitting thunder and
> torrential rain.  Did I mention we had old-fashioned tents with metal
> poles?  Hmm.  Interesting.  We all hid in our tents for about 2 hours
> while it bucketed it down, then emerged like wary rabbits for dinner.
> Good thing we'd already gone on a walk to the waterfall, because all
> other activity was out!
> Anyway, today (Sunday) we built shelters in the woods, did tie-dying
> and then tidied up the camp, downed tents and came home.  I already
> have my second load of laundry in the wash, have my backpack unpacked
> and put away, have had a shower and a cup of tea, and am now writing
> out the course guidelines for an evening class I'll help teach this
> autumn.  I'm covered in midge bites, but it's good to be home!

> -- Jo in Scotland

 
 
 

OT - Camping! - back home

Post by CNYstitche » Tue, 07 Jun 2005 10:13:32


MIDGE: A midge is a tiny dipteran (two-winged) fly, a relative of the
mosquito. There are thousands of midge species, however those of most
interest to us are members of the Ceratopogonidae family - the "Biting
Midges". This family belongs to the genus Culicoides, which consists of
over 800 species in total. These biting midges are equipped with very
specialised mouths that enable them to pierce skin.

Many people believe that all midges bite, this is a common
misconception. Most species of midgies are actually harmless. These
"friendly" midgies belong to the Chironomidae family, and have no
piercing mouthparts. Unfortunately for us, there are plenty of biting
midgies about, ready to cause mayhem! Lots of harmless midges, such as
the "dancing midge", are mistaken for biting midgies and are often
killed by wary people.

found at: http://www.FoundCollection.com/

Larisa, HTH

Quote:

> I have no idea what a midge is. When we were on vacation in the Tennessee
> mountains last week, something bit me. "What was it?" asked DH.
>     How would I know?
>     I did not stay awake identifying anything that might take a bite of my
> wrinkled old hide.
>     Whether a boa constrictor or a tarantula, it itched like mad.
>     I tried all the logical reliefs - and nothing helped.
>     Totally wild and desperate - the *Bite* had gone from a tiny little pink
> spot to an enormous whelp with sibling whelps appearing around it.
>     I tried a ridiculous coat of something I'd read about in the newspapers.
> Here in the usa it's called "Vick's Vaporub".  Contains, maybe, menthol,
> turpentine and eucalyptus. Ordinarily, it would be helpful for a stuffy
> nose.
>     This was not an ordinary situation.
>     Absolutely desperate (not to mention, borderline ***), I tried
> rubbing the Vicks on the bite.
>     Ahhh.  Peace.  Quiet.
>     Smelling like the***ens but who cared?
>     And just one more silly cure - sometimes painting the bites of vile
> little critters with nail polish - clear, psychedelic puce or fire truck
> red, no matter, - will put the bites to rest.
>     Rest.
>     Ah, yes.
>     That is a good thing.  Polly


>>Hello folks!
>>We had a sunny Friday, and a sunny Saturday... until a terrific
>>thunder and lightning storm hit us.  Wow!  Fairly spectacular, with
>>lightning flashes directly above us, ear-splitting thunder and
>>torrential rain.  Did I mention we had old-fashioned tents with metal
>>poles?  Hmm.  Interesting.  We all hid in our tents for about 2 hours
>>while it bucketed it down, then emerged like wary rabbits for dinner.
>>Good thing we'd already gone on a walk to the waterfall, because all
>>other activity was out!
>>Anyway, today (Sunday) we built shelters in the woods, did tie-dying
>>and then tidied up the camp, downed tents and came home.  I already
>>have my second load of laundry in the wash, have my backpack unpacked
>>and put away, have had a shower and a cup of tea, and am now writing
>>out the course guidelines for an evening class I'll help teach this
>>autumn.  I'm covered in midge bites, but it's good to be home!

>>-- Jo in Scotland

 
 
 

OT - Camping! - back home

Post by the black ros » Tue, 07 Jun 2005 10:49:21


Quote:

> MIDGE: A midge is a tiny dipteran (two-winged) fly, a relative of the
> mosquito. There are thousands of midge species, however those of most
> interest to us are members of the Ceratopogonidae family - the "Biting
> Midges". This family belongs to the genus Culicoides, which consists of
> over 800 species in total. These biting midges are equipped with very
> specialised mouths that enable them to pierce skin.

Ah.  In my dialect, we call those "no-see-em's."  Little tiny bugs with
bii-ii-ii-iig teeth!  The swelling you get is far out of proportion to
the size of the bite.  *** little creatures.

--

the black rose
Research Associate in the Field of Child Development and Human
Relations
http://www.FoundCollection.com/
2005 BOMs: http://www.FoundCollection.com/

-------- __o
-----   -\<.    --------  __o
---  (  )/ (  )    ----  -\<.
--------------------  (  )/ (  )
-----------------------------------------

 
 
 

OT - Camping! - back home

Post by KJ » Tue, 07 Jun 2005 10:55:06


sounds like what we call chiggers.  And they do itch like crazy!
http://www.FoundCollection.com/
http://www.FoundCollection.com/
I got itchy just reading the articles about them!


Quote:
>I have no idea what a midge is. When we were on vacation in the Tennessee
> mountains last week, something bit me. "What was it?" asked DH.
>    How would I know?
>    I did not stay awake identifying anything that might take a bite of my
> wrinkled old hide.
>    Whether a boa constrictor or a tarantula, it itched like mad.
>    I tried all the logical reliefs - and nothing helped.
>    Totally wild and desperate - the *Bite* had gone from a tiny little
> pink
> spot to an enormous whelp with sibling whelps appearing around it.
>    I tried a ridiculous coat of something I'd read about in the
> newspapers.
> Here in the usa it's called "Vick's Vaporub".  Contains, maybe, menthol,
> turpentine and eucalyptus. Ordinarily, it would be helpful for a stuffy
> nose.
>    This was not an ordinary situation.
>    Absolutely desperate (not to mention, borderline ***), I tried
> rubbing the Vicks on the bite.
>    Ahhh.  Peace.  Quiet.
>    Smelling like the***ens but who cared?
>    And just one more silly cure - sometimes painting the bites of vile
> little critters with nail polish - clear, psychedelic puce or fire truck
> red, no matter, - will put the bites to rest.
>    Rest.
>    Ah, yes.
>    That is a good thing.  Polly


>> Hello folks!
>> We had a sunny Friday, and a sunny Saturday... until a terrific
>> thunder and lightning storm hit us.  Wow!  Fairly spectacular, with
>> lightning flashes directly above us, ear-splitting thunder and
>> torrential rain.  Did I mention we had old-fashioned tents with metal
>> poles?  Hmm.  Interesting.  We all hid in our tents for about 2 hours
>> while it bucketed it down, then emerged like wary rabbits for dinner.
>> Good thing we'd already gone on a walk to the waterfall, because all
>> other activity was out!
>> Anyway, today (Sunday) we built shelters in the woods, did tie-dying
>> and then tidied up the camp, downed tents and came home.  I already
>> have my second load of laundry in the wash, have my backpack unpacked
>> and put away, have had a shower and a cup of tea, and am now writing
>> out the course guidelines for an evening class I'll help teach this
>> autumn.  I'm covered in midge bites, but it's good to be home!

>> -- Jo in Scotland

 
 
 

OT - Camping! - back home

Post by CNYstitche » Tue, 07 Jun 2005 11:05:15


I'm used to "no-see-ums" or chiggers...depends on which part of the
family I happen to be with...lol
Quote:


>> MIDGE: A midge is a tiny dipteran (two-winged) fly, a relative of the
>> mosquito. There are thousands of midge species, however those of most
>> interest to us are members of the Ceratopogonidae family - the "Biting
>> Midges". This family belongs to the genus Culicoides, which consists
>> of over 800 species in total. These biting midges are equipped with
>> very specialised mouths that enable them to pierce skin.

> Ah.  In my dialect, we call those "no-see-em's."  Little tiny bugs with
> bii-ii-ii-iig teeth!  The swelling you get is far out of proportion to
> the size of the bite.  *** little creatures.

 
 
 

OT - Camping! - back home

Post by Hanne Gottliebse » Tue, 07 Jun 2005 16:55:00


But ... I was always told that chiggers crawl (not fly) and that they
burrow under the skin - midges don't do that.

Regardless, Scottish midges are right up there with Finnish mosquitos,
in my experience!

Hanne in London

Quote:

> sounds like what we call chiggers.  And they do itch like crazy!
> http://www.FoundCollection.com/
> http://www.FoundCollection.com/
> I got itchy just reading the articles about them!



>>I have no idea what a midge is. When we were on vacation in the Tennessee
>>mountains last week, something bit me. "What was it?" asked DH.
>>   How would I know?
>>   I did not stay awake identifying anything that might take a bite of my
>>wrinkled old hide.
>>   Whether a boa constrictor or a tarantula, it itched like mad.
>>   I tried all the logical reliefs - and nothing helped.
>>   Totally wild and desperate - the *Bite* had gone from a tiny little
>>pink
>>spot to an enormous whelp with sibling whelps appearing around it.
>>   I tried a ridiculous coat of something I'd read about in the
>>newspapers.
>>Here in the usa it's called "Vick's Vaporub".  Contains, maybe, menthol,
>>turpentine and eucalyptus. Ordinarily, it would be helpful for a stuffy
>>nose.
>>   This was not an ordinary situation.
>>   Absolutely desperate (not to mention, borderline ***), I tried
>>rubbing the Vicks on the bite.
>>   Ahhh.  Peace.  Quiet.
>>   Smelling like the***ens but who cared?
>>   And just one more silly cure - sometimes painting the bites of vile
>>little critters with nail polish - clear, psychedelic puce or fire truck
>>red, no matter, - will put the bites to rest.
>>   Rest.
>>   Ah, yes.
>>   That is a good thing.  Polly


>>>Hello folks!
>>>We had a sunny Friday, and a sunny Saturday... until a terrific
>>>thunder and lightning storm hit us.  Wow!  Fairly spectacular, with
>>>lightning flashes directly above us, ear-splitting thunder and
>>>torrential rain.  Did I mention we had old-fashioned tents with metal
>>>poles?  Hmm.  Interesting.  We all hid in our tents for about 2 hours
>>>while it bucketed it down, then emerged like wary rabbits for dinner.
>>>Good thing we'd already gone on a walk to the waterfall, because all
>>>other activity was out!
>>>Anyway, today (Sunday) we built shelters in the woods, did tie-dying
>>>and then tidied up the camp, downed tents and came home.  I already
>>>have my second load of laundry in the wash, have my backpack unpacked
>>>and put away, have had a shower and a cup of tea, and am now writing
>>>out the course guidelines for an evening class I'll help teach this
>>>autumn.  I'm covered in midge bites, but it's good to be home!

>>>-- Jo in Scotland

 
 
 

OT - Camping! - back home

Post by the black ros » Tue, 07 Jun 2005 22:36:54


Quote:

> But ... I was always told that chiggers crawl (not fly) and that they
> burrow under the skin - midges don't do that.

That's what I always thought too, and I'm relatively certain that
chiggers are crawly burrowy things in some parts of the country.  It's
probably just a regional difference in names.

--

the black rose
Research Associate in the Field of Child Development and Human
Relations
http://community.webshots.com/user/blackrosequilts
2005 BOMs: http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/blackrosequilts/my_photos

-------- __o
-----   -\<.    --------  __o
---  (  )/ (  )    ----  -\<.
--------------------  (  )/ (  )
-----------------------------------------

 
 
 

OT - Camping! - back home

Post by Elliso » Wed, 08 Jun 2005 02:32:59


Howdy!
  Midges are not chiggers.
Chiggers burrow in and crawl under the skin,
and drive you #%&*!%fricken*#&^$%^ nutz!
Yeah, the fingernail polish can help, and the Vicks,
or Campho Phenique or ice or anti-itch salves.
http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/2000/2100.html
 (Mom usually had fingernail polish in her purse;
Dad had Vicks nearby.)

Midges fly.  Some bite, some don't.
Another form of hell on earth.
http://www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/usfeatures/midges/
 Again, anti-itch creams and calamine lotion give some relief.
Some.
Good luck!

Ragmop/Sandy--staying indoors to quilt ;-D


Quote:
> But ... I was always told that chiggers crawl (not fly) and that they
> burrow under the skin - midges don't do that.

> Regardless, Scottish midges are right up there with Finnish mosquitos, in
> my experience!

> Hanne in London


>> sounds like what we call chiggers.  And they do itch like crazy!
>> http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/2000/2100.html
>> http://www.conservation.state.mo.us/nathis/arthopo/chiggers/
>> I got itchy just reading the articles about them!



>>>I have no idea what a midge is. When we were on vacation in the Tennessee
*friendly snipping*

 
 
 

OT - Camping! - back home

Post by Tari » Wed, 08 Jun 2005 02:38:17


never met a chigger but dh grew up in KC.  He only talks
about bad things there and I have heard about chiggers.
He describes them like you do Sandy. They must really be awful.
Can you spray the lawn to keep them away?
  Sounds like another good reason to appreciate a hot dry climate.
Taria
Quote:

> Howdy!
>   Midges are not chiggers.
> Chiggers burrow in and crawl under the skin,
> and drive you #%&*!%fricken*#&^$%^ nutz!
> Yeah, the fingernail polish can help, and the Vicks,
> or Campho Phenique or ice or anti-itch salves.
> http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/2000/2100.html
>  (Mom usually had fingernail polish in her purse;
> Dad had Vicks nearby.)

> Midges fly.  Some bite, some don't.
> Another form of hell on earth.
> http://www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/usfeatures/midges/
>  Again, anti-itch creams and calamine lotion give some relief.
> Some.
> Good luck!

> Ragmop/Sandy--staying indoors to quilt ;-D

 
 
 

OT - Camping! - back home

Post by KJ » Wed, 08 Jun 2005 02:55:11


Interesting!  From the original post, it did sound like midges fly, so I was
fairly sure they weren't the same as chiggers.  But their bite sounds very
similar.  Both hellish varments!  Thanks for the link too.  DD will be
teaching in Scotland in the fall, so I like finding new sites with
information.  Google hadn't linked me to this one.  Thanks!


Quote:
> Howdy!
>  Midges are not chiggers.
> Chiggers burrow in and crawl under the skin,
> and drive you #%&*!%fricken*#&^$%^ nutz!
> Yeah, the fingernail polish can help, and the Vicks,
> or Campho Phenique or ice or anti-itch salves.
> http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/2000/2100.html
> (Mom usually had fingernail polish in her purse;
> Dad had Vicks nearby.)

> Midges fly.  Some bite, some don't.
> Another form of hell on earth.
> http://www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/usfeatures/midges/
> Again, anti-itch creams and calamine lotion give some relief.
> Some.
> Good luck!

> Ragmop/Sandy--staying indoors to quilt ;-D



>> But ... I was always told that chiggers crawl (not fly) and that they
>> burrow under the skin - midges don't do that.

>> Regardless, Scottish midges are right up there with Finnish mosquitos, in
>> my experience!

>> Hanne in London


>>> sounds like what we call chiggers.  And they do itch like crazy!
>>> http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/2000/2100.html
>>> http://www.conservation.state.mo.us/nathis/arthopo/chiggers/
>>> I got itchy just reading the articles about them!



>>>>I have no idea what a midge is. When we were on vacation in the
>>>>Tennessee
> *friendly snipping*

 
 
 

OT - Camping! - back home

Post by Donna in Idah » Wed, 08 Jun 2005 03:02:25


Chiggers!  Does that bring back memories.  Before we would go blackberry
picking in the summer in Indiana, we would liberally douse ourselves with
yellow sulfur powder.  Anyplace where your clothes fit snugly (waistbands,
etc.).  That's where chiggers like to burrow.  They are miserable little
critters!  That's one thing we don't have in Idaho.  Don't have fire flies
either - wish we had them.  Don't miss the chiggers at all!
--
Donna Aten, Coordinator
Project Linus - Boise/SW Idaho Chapter
Website: www.LinusIdaho.org


Quote:
> Howdy!
>  Midges are not chiggers.
> Chiggers burrow in and crawl under the skin,
> and drive you #%&*!%fricken*#&^$%^ nutz!
> Yeah, the fingernail polish can help, and the Vicks,
> or Campho Phenique or ice or anti-itch salves.
> http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/2000/2100.html
> (Mom usually had fingernail polish in her purse;
> Dad had Vicks nearby.)

> Midges fly.  Some bite, some don't.
> Another form of hell on earth.
> http://www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/usfeatures/midges/
> Again, anti-itch creams and calamine lotion give some relief.
> Some.
> Good luck!

> Ragmop/Sandy--staying indoors to quilt ;-D



>> But ... I was always told that chiggers crawl (not fly) and that they
>> burrow under the skin - midges don't do that.

>> Regardless, Scottish midges are right up there with Finnish mosquitos, in
>> my experience!

>> Hanne in London


>>> sounds like what we call chiggers.  And they do itch like crazy!
>>> http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/2000/2100.html
>>> http://www.conservation.state.mo.us/nathis/arthopo/chiggers/
>>> I got itchy just reading the articles about them!



>>>>I have no idea what a midge is. When we were on vacation in the
>>>>Tennessee
> *friendly snipping*