Local quilt show: observations

Local quilt show: observations

Post by John » Mon, 17 Aug 2009 02:25:39



Let me start off with a disclaimer. If any of you are offended by my
observations, then I am sorry. If you derive pleasure from the things
I am commenting on, then go ahead and continue to enjoy them. My
opinions are my own, and "might" coincide with others, or maybe not.
That stated, herein follows a brief recounting of todays visit to the
local yearly quilt show.
 Lois and I showed up at the local show and started viewing the
offerings from large bed sized quilts to small wall***s and items
of apparel. The one thing that struck me, and Lois, was the fact that
the degree of overall quilting by machine was of a singular nature.
This observation applied to about 75% of the quilts. The other 25%
were hand quilted, and this observation does not apply to them. They
were very nicely done.
As to the 75%; I have never seen as large a group of quilts, in my
life, that were done in such a random manner that defied the sewn
seams of the pattern, of the quilt. It is as if the person doing the
quilting, and some of them were "professionally" machine quilted, and
they used that word "professionally", loosely, in my opinion,  was
insensitive to the fact that they were crossing over the seams of the
pattern of the quilt on autopilot in an effort to confuse attempted
artistic random loops and squiggles, in the guise of art, and not
respecting the pattern seams as defining elements of the quilt. Now if
this is the new norm and I am completely out of step with State of the
Art Free motion quilting, then so be it, I am out of step. If you look
at the other 25% of the quilts that were hand stitched. they used
overall quilting in the appropriate seam bordered elements of the
pattern and stayed within the confines of the seams and produced a
quilt that respected the pattern design and complimented that with
area quilting which enhanced the overall appearance. Out of probably
35 Machine quilts, I think there were probably 2 or 3 that met the the
above criteria of respecting the seams, and not going over them
randomey, in an attempt to achieve, I don't know what. It is almost as
if people take a class on free motion quilting and then throw away all
the time honored traditions of using quilting and stippling within
area elements that respect the seam lines of the sewn pattern, and
throw themselves into the process of random placement of the needle on
autopilot. Thank you very much,but I think I will get on the other
bus, on this show.
So there you have it. My personal take on the recent, and not so happy
viewing of the state of the art of Machine quilting, as it pertains to
Knox County, Ohio. And once again, I hope that I have not stepped on
any toes here. Or otherwise raised any hackles.

John

 
 
 

Local quilt show: observations

Post by Louise in Iow » Mon, 17 Aug 2009 03:28:51


John - no offense taken here! I went to a quilt show last year where I saw
much of the same as far as machine quilting. On the other hand, at another
show, I saw more examples of machine quilting being done in a manner than
enhanced and complemented the piecing, so that kind of work really is being
done.

One thing to keep in mind, though, is that it's not always the machine
quilter who chooses the quilting design (this applies to those quilts done
by a "professional"). Sometimes, for instance, the piecer tells the machine
quilter that she wants to spend no more than a certain amount of money. The
quilter then has to determine what kind of design she can use and still make
money. Many times that is an edge-to-edge design or a form of meander. The
piecer would get a more custom-designed quilting job if she wanted (or was
able) to spend more money, but budgets don't always allow for that. Other
times, the piecer specifically requests the kind of design you're
describing - they want something that will hold all three layers together
and nothing more. And, quite honestly, it appears there are piecers who just
don't know/understand that their quilt could be even more beautiful if an
appropriate quilting design were created for it.

In an ideal world, every piecer would have an unlimited budget for the
quilting portion of the project and the machine quilter would find the
perfect quilting design that would show off the piecing and make every
piecer the star of the quilt show!

I'm looking forward to our local show this fall - will be interested to see
if the trend is toward overall designs.
--
Louise in Iowa

http://www.FoundCollection.com/


Quote:
> Let me start off with a disclaimer. If any of you are offended by my
> observations, then I am sorry. If you derive pleasure from the things
> I am commenting on, then go ahead and continue to enjoy them. My
> opinions are my own, and "might" coincide with others, or maybe not.
> That stated, herein follows a brief recounting of todays visit to the
> local yearly quilt show.
> Lois and I showed up at the local show and started viewing the
> offerings from large bed sized quilts to small wall***s and items
> of apparel. The one thing that struck me, and Lois, was the fact that
> the degree of overall quilting by machine was of a singular nature.
> This observation applied to about 75% of the quilts. The other 25%
> were hand quilted, and this observation does not apply to them. They
> were very nicely done.
> As to the 75%; I have never seen as large a group of quilts, in my
> life, that were done in such a random manner that defied the sewn
> seams of the pattern, of the quilt. It is as if the person doing the
> quilting, and some of them were "professionally" machine quilted, and
> they used that word "professionally", loosely, in my opinion,  was
> insensitive to the fact that they were crossing over the seams of the
> pattern of the quilt on autopilot in an effort to confuse attempted
> artistic random loops and squiggles, in the guise of art, and not
> respecting the pattern seams as defining elements of the quilt. Now if
> this is the new norm and I am completely out of step with State of the
> Art Free motion quilting, then so be it, I am out of step. If you look
> at the other 25% of the quilts that were hand stitched. they used
> overall quilting in the appropriate seam bordered elements of the
> pattern and stayed within the confines of the seams and produced a
> quilt that respected the pattern design and complimented that with
> area quilting which enhanced the overall appearance. Out of probably
> 35 Machine quilts, I think there were probably 2 or 3 that met the the
> above criteria of respecting the seams, and not going over them
> randomey, in an attempt to achieve, I don't know what. It is almost as
> if people take a class on free motion quilting and then throw away all
> the time honored traditions of using quilting and stippling within
> area elements that respect the seam lines of the sewn pattern, and
> throw themselves into the process of random placement of the needle on
> autopilot. Thank you very much,but I think I will get on the other
> bus, on this show.
> So there you have it. My personal take on the recent, and not so happy
> viewing of the state of the art of Machine quilting, as it pertains to
> Knox County, Ohio. And once again, I hope that I have not stepped on
> any toes here. Or otherwise raised any hackles.

> John


 
 
 

Local quilt show: observations

Post by Tari » Mon, 17 Aug 2009 03:58:15


We have a local quilter that does a large meandering/mattress allover type
pattern.  It is
really just plain old function.   The work is a bargain in comparison to
really beautiful
 artful machine quilting.  Many of the guild members have their work done by
this fellow
 and so lots of the work at their small show is his.  For a dorm room, folks
with kids or
pets on the bed it works but it isn't the most creative choice.  Some of my
quilts have an allover
pattern.  I do lots of scrappy busy stuff that will be functional.  There is
that all the way to
the hand quilting I do.  I guess there is a place for all of it but I would
like to see special
work in shows. I am not sure that happens in small guild shows. Every time I
go to the
road to CA show I come away knowing just how inferior my MQ'ing is.  Sure it
is improving
but on a regular machine there are limitations that just aren't around for
long arm quilters.
DH and I were talking about this last week.  He has played guitar
professionally but he could
never in this life practice enough to be concert type guitar player.
Everyone has different
natural born capabilities. Of course hard work and determination go a long
way even so.
 I know as folks have physical limitations there are reasons to have your
work done by others.
For myself, at this point, I could not call a quilt someone else quilted
mine because I can do it
myself.  I do think there is room for it all though.
Hopefully we all have tough toes around here.  : )
Taria
 
 
 

Local quilt show: observations

Post by Julia in M » Mon, 17 Aug 2009 04:20:33


I agree. Also many machine quilters haven't acquired the skills
necessary to do the custom work that will enhance the pattern of the
top. It takes a lot of practice, a bit more thinking, and perhaps a bit
more imagination. I do all my own quilting, both hand and machine, in
part because I'm too cheap to pay someone to do a really great job of
longarm quilting. I use my regular machine (Elna 6003 Quilter's Dream).
I'm not great at it, but I do try to do something other than allover
stippling or meandering. I have meandered the center of a few small,
quick quilts, but always did something a little different in the
borders; I think those were Yellow Brick Road or similar patterns and
simple meandering seemed appropriate.

The heaviest quilting I've ever done was on the Julia's Lily quilt near
the bottom of <http://webpages.charter.net/jaccola/Quilts2008.html>. I
was also happy with the way the red & pink Warm Wishes turned out. The
other Warm Wishes quilt on that page was much simpler, all straight
line, quilting.

Julia in MN

Quote:

> John - no offense taken here! I went to a quilt show last year where I saw
> much of the same as far as machine quilting. On the other hand, at another
> show, I saw more examples of machine quilting being done in a manner than
> enhanced and complemented the piecing, so that kind of work really is being
> done.

> One thing to keep in mind, though, is that it's not always the machine
> quilter who chooses the quilting design (this applies to those quilts done
> by a "professional"). Sometimes, for instance, the piecer tells the machine
> quilter that she wants to spend no more than a certain amount of money. The
> quilter then has to determine what kind of design she can use and still make
> money. Many times that is an edge-to-edge design or a form of meander. The
> piecer would get a more custom-designed quilting job if she wanted (or was
> able) to spend more money, but budgets don't always allow for that. Other
> times, the piecer specifically requests the kind of design you're
> describing - they want something that will hold all three layers together
> and nothing more. And, quite honestly, it appears there are piecers who just
> don't know/understand that their quilt could be even more beautiful if an
> appropriate quilting design were created for it.

> In an ideal world, every piecer would have an unlimited budget for the
> quilting portion of the project and the machine quilter would find the
> perfect quilting design that would show off the piecing and make every
> piecer the star of the quilt show!

> I'm looking forward to our local show this fall - will be interested to see
> if the trend is toward overall designs.

--
-----------
This message has been scanned for viruses by Norton Anti-Virus
<http://webpages.charter.net/jaccola/default>
-----------
 
 
 

Local quilt show: observations

Post by John » Mon, 17 Aug 2009 04:58:11



Quote:
> Let me start off with a disclaimer. If any of you are offended by my
> observations, then I am sorry. If you derive pleasure from the things
> I am commenting on, then go ahead and continue to enjoy them. My
> opinions are my own, and "might" coincide with others, or maybe not.
> That stated, herein follows a brief recounting of todays visit to the
> local yearly quilt show.
> ?Lois and I showed up at the local show and started viewing the
> offerings from large bed sized quilts to small wall***s and items
> of apparel. The one thing that struck me, and Lois, was the fact that
> the degree of overall quilting by machine was of a singular nature.
> This observation applied to about 75% of the quilts. The other 25%
> were hand quilted, and this observation does not apply to them. They
> were very nicely done.
> As to the 75%; I have never seen as large a group of quilts, in my
> life, that were done in such a random manner that defied the sewn
> seams of the pattern, of the quilt. It is as if the person doing the
> quilting, and some of them were "professionally" machine quilted, and
> they used that word "professionally", loosely, in my opinion, ?was
> insensitive to the fact that they were crossing over the seams of the
> pattern of the quilt on autopilot in an effort to confuse attempted
> artistic random loops and squiggles, in the guise of art, and not
> respecting the pattern seams as defining elements of the quilt. Now if
> this is the new norm and I am completely out of step with State of the
> Art Free motion quilting, then so be it, I am out of step. If you look
> at the other 25% of the quilts that were hand stitched. they used
> overall quilting in the appropriate seam bordered elements of the
> pattern and stayed within the confines of the seams and produced a
> quilt that respected the pattern design and complimented that with
> area quilting which enhanced the overall appearance. Out of probably
> 35 Machine quilts, I think there were probably 2 or 3 that met the the
> above criteria of respecting the seams, and not going over them
> randomey, in an attempt to achieve, I don't know what. It is almost as
> if people take a class on free motion quilting and then throw away all
> the time honored traditions of using quilting and stippling within
> area elements that respect the seam lines of the sewn pattern, and
> throw themselves into the process of random placement of the needle on
> autopilot. Thank you very much,but I think I will get on the other
> bus, on this show.
> So there you have it. My personal take on the recent, and not so happy
> viewing of the state of the art of Machine quilting, as it pertains to
> Knox County, Ohio. And once again, I hope that I have not stepped on
> any toes here. Or otherwise raised any hackles.

> John

I can understand the limitations of money into the overall equation.
But, I do all of the quilting on all of my quilts myself; with a
machine, and proudly so.
1. If I didn't do it, all myself, I wouldn't call it, "My Quilt".
2. If I paid to have it quilted, I wouldn't enter it into a show.
3. I don't like the look of all over quilting on small pieced tops.
4. Number three does not apply to art quilts which are different than
small pieced quilts, and have a different type of piecing pattern than
traditional small pieced pattern quilts, and therefor might be a
candidate for overall machine quilting. I don't make Art Quilts, so I
have no personal experience with that element of the medium. I neither
like or dislike them. They are a different kettle of fish, for me.
Neither better nor worse. Just different. If I ever did do an Art
Quilt, I would certainly consider an all over quilting pattern, if I
thought it would not detract from the design.
 Maybe I am a traditionalist in this regard, but one of the quilts
that I really appreciated  was machine pieced, and hand quilted. The
hand quilting was stitched in the ditch. Now there was somebody that
took hand stitching to another level. She buried the stitches in the
fold of the seam and they were not even seen in some instances. That
takes commitment when it could have been done by machine with no foul.
Except it wouldn't have been hand quilted. Kudo's to her. I wish I
could do the hand stitching, but these old stubby hammer pounded
fingers just won't cooperate. My own personal cross to bear, I guess.

John

 
 
 

Local quilt show: observations

Post by Mary » Mon, 17 Aug 2009 05:23:01


I tend to do everything by hand and generally dislike machine
quilting.  Perhaps it's a sort of "style", but I really think there
are far too many people who will take a very nice quilt top and
literally ruin it with that sort of machine quilting you describe, and
that is rather sad.  Some machine quilting is beautifully done, but
that seems to be the exception these days.

Stupid question, though -- if Person A makes a quilt top and then has
it machine quilted by Person B, how can Person A put that quilt into a
show or a competition?  Does the quilt go in as by Person A and Person
B?  And is there a difference if the machine quilting is done by a
professional or some sort of commercial enterprise?

 
 
 

Local quilt show: observations

Post by turtl » Mon, 17 Aug 2009 05:26:29


Quote:

> Let me start off with a disclaimer. If any of you are offended by my
> observations, then I am sorry. If you derive pleasure from the things
> I am commenting on, then go ahead and continue to enjoy them. My
> opinions are my own, and "might" coincide with others, or maybe not.
> That stated, herein follows a brief recounting of todays visit to the
> local yearly quilt show.
>  Lois and I showed up at the local show and started viewing the
> offerings from large bed sized quilts to small wall***s and items
> of apparel. The one thing that struck me, and Lois, was the fact that
> the degree of overall quilting by machine was of a singular nature.
> This observation applied to about 75% of the quilts. The other 25%
> were hand quilted, and this observation does not apply to them. They
> were very nicely done.
> As to the 75%; I have never seen as large a group of quilts, in my
> life, that were done in such a random manner that defied the sewn
> seams of the pattern, of the quilt. It is as if the person doing the
> quilting, and some of them were "professionally" machine quilted, and
> they used that word "professionally", loosely, in my opinion,  was
> insensitive to the fact that they were crossing over the seams of the
> pattern of the quilt on autopilot in an effort to confuse attempted
> artistic random loops and squiggles, in the guise of art, and not
> respecting the pattern seams as defining elements of the quilt. Now if
> this is the new norm and I am completely out of step with State of the
> Art Free motion quilting, then so be it, I am out of step. If you look
> at the other 25% of the quilts that were hand stitched. they used
> overall quilting in the appropriate seam bordered elements of the
> pattern and stayed within the confines of the seams and produced a
> quilt that respected the pattern design and complimented that with
> area quilting which enhanced the overall appearance. Out of probably
> 35 Machine quilts, I think there were probably 2 or 3 that met the the
> above criteria of respecting the seams, and not going over them
> randomey, in an attempt to achieve, I don't know what. It is almost as
> if people take a class on free motion quilting and then throw away all
> the time honored traditions of using quilting and stippling within
> area elements that respect the seam lines of the sewn pattern, and
> throw themselves into the process of random placement of the needle on
> autopilot. Thank you very much,but I think I will get on the other
> bus, on this show.
> So there you have it. My personal take on the recent, and not so happy
> viewing of the state of the art of Machine quilting, as it pertains to
> Knox County, Ohio. And once again, I hope that I have not stepped on
> any toes here. Or otherwise raised any hackles.

> John

I agree with you.  The quilt makers are missing out on an important
aspect of the work when they settle for this kind of quilting.
Stitch in the ditch, echo, or outline takes much more time to do so,
for "professionals", would be much more expensive.  However, if you
consider a quilt a work of art or a singular expression of artistic
craft, then I would rather do a less than perfect job myself, and try
to enhance the top's design.  Almost anyone (barring physical
restrictions) can get a walking foot and outline the major design
elements, which would be better than what you describe.
However, at a local show, people should be able to enter anything that
they are proud of and want to show off, even if it isn't up to big
show standards.  We shouldn't make anyone feel as if their work isn't
good enough to put in - that we are going to be laughing at them, or
clicking our tongues in distaste. (I know you would never do that,
John.  No one in this group would, I'm sure. ;>))  Not everyone is
into the esthetics of the craft.  Some people like to piece but don't
like to quilt, and want to save money for more fabric.  Some may like
the all over designs and don't care about winning prizes.
Hopefully, the guilds involved have someone who can give talks about
the design enhancing quality of the quilting.  (I've seen a group of
experienced hand quilters take a horrendous pieced top and turn it
into a nice quilt with judicious quilting.)   Those who care will
listen, look, and learn.  Those who don't will continue to produce
attractive but less-than-they-could-be pieces.  This is the way it has
always been in the crafts and arts, and (sigh) we need both kinds to
keep the arts going.

Turtle
It's not the things you have that make you happy, it's the things you
do.

 
 
 

Local quilt show: observations

Post by was rabbit » Mon, 17 Aug 2009 06:36:37


Hi, John! I'm neither offended nor hackle-raised nor anything of the
sort. And it might be nonsense to comment on something you've seen and
I haven't. That said...

It sounds like the quilting you're describing is what I think of as
"edge to edge" rather than "custom." I think lots of quilts are
finished that way by professional quilters when the quilt is not
destined for stardom and customers don't want to pay for custom work.
Lots of us finish quilts that way because of time constraints or lack
of experience. Me, for one. My _quilting_ will not win awards anytime
in the near future. But a few of my quilts might stand up decently
against the competition in local or regional shows with regard to
pattern/design, use of color, etc. When I use edge-to-edge quilting
other than meandering, want the quilting design to "make sense" with
the patchwork design (No roses on a brown geometric, for instance<g>),
but it's the patchwork and color that I'm concerned about. Maybe it's
because I rarely use patterns...
Or maybe I'm missing something in what you wrote.

--Heidi

http://www.FoundCollection.com/


Quote:
> Let me start off with a disclaimer. If any of you are offended by my
> observations, then I am sorry. If you derive pleasure from the things
> I am commenting on, then go ahead and continue to enjoy them. My
> opinions are my own, and "might" coincide with others, or maybe not.
> That stated, herein follows a brief recounting of todays visit to the
> local yearly quilt show.
> ?Lois and I showed up at the local show and started viewing the
> offerings from large bed sized quilts to small wall***s and items
> of apparel. The one thing that struck me, and Lois, was the fact that
> the degree of overall quilting by machine was of a singular nature.
> This observation applied to about 75% of the quilts. The other 25%
> were hand quilted, and this observation does not apply to them. They
> were very nicely done.
> As to the 75%; I have never seen as large a group of quilts, in my
> life, that were done in such a random manner that defied the sewn
> seams of the pattern, of the quilt. It is as if the person doing the
> quilting, and some of them were "professionally" machine quilted, and
> they used that word "professionally", loosely, in my opinion, ?was
> insensitive to the fact that they were crossing over the seams of the
> pattern of the quilt on autopilot in an effort to confuse attempted
> artistic random loops and squiggles, in the guise of art, and not
> respecting the pattern seams as defining elements of the quilt. Now if
> this is the new norm and I am completely out of step with State of the
> Art Free motion quilting, then so be it, I am out of step. If you look
> at the other 25% of the quilts that were hand stitched. they used
> overall quilting in the appropriate seam bordered elements of the
> pattern and stayed within the confines of the seams and produced a
> quilt that respected the pattern design and complimented that with
> area quilting which enhanced the overall appearance. Out of probably
> 35 Machine quilts, I think there were probably 2 or 3 that met the the
> above criteria of respecting the seams, and not going over them
> randomey, in an attempt to achieve, I don't know what. It is almost as
> if people take a class on free motion quilting and then throw away all
> the time honored traditions of using quilting and stippling within
> area elements that respect the seam lines of the sewn pattern, and
> throw themselves into the process of random placement of the needle on
> autopilot. Thank you very much,but I think I will get on the other
> bus, on this show.
> So there you have it. My personal take on the recent, and not so happy
> viewing of the state of the art of Machine quilting, as it pertains to
> Knox County, Ohio. And once again, I hope that I have not stepped on
> any toes here. Or otherwise raised any hackles.

> John

 
 
 

Local quilt show: observations

Post by was rabbit » Mon, 17 Aug 2009 06:48:36


Mary, in the few shows I've been to in the last couple of years, there
were many tags that credited the quilter as well as the piecer. But
just for argument's sake, what if the quilter is the one who wants to
show the quilt? Shouldn't s/he also credit the one who put it
together?

I haven't seen any difference in credit for a professional or
commercial quilter. Even if one is doing it for a living, it's still
one's art.

--Heidi

http://community.webshots.com/user/rabbit2b


Quote:
> Stupid question, though -- if Person A makes a quilt top and then has
> it machine quilted by Person B, how can Person A put that quilt into a
> show or a competition? ?Does the quilt go in as by Person A and Person
> B? ?And is there a difference if the machine quilting is done by a
> professional or some sort of commercial enterprise?

 
 
 

Local quilt show: observations

Post by Donna in Idah » Mon, 17 Aug 2009 06:48:28


At the quilt show I just attended, there were both types of machine
quilting - all over and specific to the quilt.  We have a good number of
machine quilters in our area that are absolutely wonderful.  Their quilting
definitely enhances the piecing.  I know that some of the machine quilters
work with the piecer from the start.  One of the most intriguing quilts at
this show was three dimensional.  I talked to the lady that quilted it. She
told me that she quilted the 3-D portions of the quilt first.  Then the
quilt top was put together and then she finished the machine quilting.  The
machine quilter is always given credit for her work.

And, then you have the 'utility' quilts that have an all-over meandering
quilting that doesn't do a thing for the quilt.   But, if that's what the
piecer asked for and she's happy with it, who are we to question how her
quilt was finished?

Donna in SW Idaho



Quote:
> John - no offense taken here! I went to a quilt show last year where I saw
> much of the same as far as machine quilting. On the other hand, at another
> show, I saw more examples of machine quilting being done in a manner than
> enhanced and complemented the piecing, so that kind of work really is
> being done.

> One thing to keep in mind, though, is that it's not always the machine
> quilter who chooses the quilting design (this applies to those quilts done
> by a "professional"). Sometimes, for instance, the piecer tells the
> machine quilter that she wants to spend no more than a certain amount of
> money. The quilter then has to determine what kind of design she can use
> and still make money. Many times that is an edge-to-edge design or a form
> of meander. The piecer would get a more custom-designed quilting job if
> she wanted (or was able) to spend more money, but budgets don't always
> allow for that. Other times, the piecer specifically requests the kind of
> design you're describing - they want something that will hold all three
> layers together and nothing more. And, quite honestly, it appears there
> are piecers who just don't know/understand that their quilt could be even
> more beautiful if an appropriate quilting design were created for it.

> In an ideal world, every piecer would have an unlimited budget for the
> quilting portion of the project and the machine quilter would find the
> perfect quilting design that would show off the piecing and make every
> piecer the star of the quilt show!

> I'm looking forward to our local show this fall - will be interested to
> see if the trend is toward overall designs.
> --
> Louise in Iowa

> http://www.FoundCollection.com/



>> Let me start off with a disclaimer. If any of you are offended by my
>> observations, then I am sorry. If you derive pleasure from the things
>> I am commenting on, then go ahead and continue to enjoy them. My
>> opinions are my own, and "might" coincide with others, or maybe not.
>> That stated, herein follows a brief recounting of todays visit to the
>> local yearly quilt show.
>> Lois and I showed up at the local show and started viewing the
>> offerings from large bed sized quilts to small wall***s and items
>> of apparel. The one thing that struck me, and Lois, was the fact that
>> the degree of overall quilting by machine was of a singular nature.
>> This observation applied to about 75% of the quilts. The other 25%
>> were hand quilted, and this observation does not apply to them. They
>> were very nicely done.
>> As to the 75%; I have never seen as large a group of quilts, in my
>> life, that were done in such a random manner that defied the sewn
>> seams of the pattern, of the quilt. It is as if the person doing the
>> quilting, and some of them were "professionally" machine quilted, and
>> they used that word "professionally", loosely, in my opinion,  was
>> insensitive to the fact that they were crossing over the seams of the
>> pattern of the quilt on autopilot in an effort to confuse attempted
>> artistic random loops and squiggles, in the guise of art, and not
>> respecting the pattern seams as defining elements of the quilt. Now if
>> this is the new norm and I am completely out of step with State of the
>> Art Free motion quilting, then so be it, I am out of step. If you look
>> at the other 25% of the quilts that were hand stitched. they used
>> overall quilting in the appropriate seam bordered elements of the
>> pattern and stayed within the confines of the seams and produced a
>> quilt that respected the pattern design and complimented that with
>> area quilting which enhanced the overall appearance. Out of probably
>> 35 Machine quilts, I think there were probably 2 or 3 that met the the
>> above criteria of respecting the seams, and not going over them
>> randomey, in an attempt to achieve, I don't know what. It is almost as
>> if people take a class on free motion quilting and then throw away all
>> the time honored traditions of using quilting and stippling within
>> area elements that respect the seam lines of the sewn pattern, and
>> throw themselves into the process of random placement of the needle on
>> autopilot. Thank you very much,but I think I will get on the other
>> bus, on this show.
>> So there you have it. My personal take on the recent, and not so happy
>> viewing of the state of the art of Machine quilting, as it pertains to
>> Knox County, Ohio. And once again, I hope that I have not stepped on
>> any toes here. Or otherwise raised any hackles.

>> John

 
 
 

Local quilt show: observations

Post by John » Mon, 17 Aug 2009 07:20:36



Quote:
> Hi, John! I'm neither offended nor hackle-raised nor anything of the
> sort. And it might be nonsense to comment on something you've seen and
> I haven't. That said...

> It sounds like the quilting you're describing is what I think of as
> "edge to edge" rather than "custom." I think lots of quilts are
> finished that way by professional quilters when the quilt is not
> destined for stardom and customers don't want to pay for custom work.
> Lots of us finish quilts that way because of time constraints or lack
> of experience. Me, for one. My _quilting_ will not win awards anytime
> in the near future. But a few of my quilts might stand up decently
> against the competition in local or regional shows with regard to
> pattern/design, use of color, etc. When I use edge-to-edge quilting
> other than meandering, want the quilting design to "make sense" with
> the patchwork design (No roses on a brown geometric, for instance<g>),
> but it's the patchwork and color that I'm concerned about. Maybe it's
> because I rarely use patterns...
> Or maybe I'm missing something in what you wrote.

> --Heidi

> http://www.FoundCollection.com/


> > Let me start off with a disclaimer. If any of you are offended by my
> > observations, then I am sorry. If you derive pleasure from the things
> > I am commenting on, then go ahead and continue to enjoy them. My
> > opinions are my own, and "might" coincide with others, or maybe not.
> > That stated, herein follows a brief recounting of todays visit to the
> > local yearly quilt show.
> > ?Lois and I showed up at the local show and started viewing the
> > offerings from large bed sized quilts to small wall***s and items
> > of apparel. The one thing that struck me, and Lois, was the fact that
> > the degree of overall quilting by machine was of a singular nature.
> > This observation applied to about 75% of the quilts. The other 25%
> > were hand quilted, and this observation does not apply to them. They
> > were very nicely done.
> > As to the 75%; I have never seen as large a group of quilts, in my
> > life, that were done in such a random manner that defied the sewn
> > seams of the pattern, of the quilt. It is as if the person doing the
> > quilting, and some of them were "professionally" machine quilted, and
> > they used that word "professionally", loosely, in my opinion, ?was
> > insensitive to the fact that they were crossing over the seams of the
> > pattern of the quilt on autopilot in an effort to confuse attempted
> > artistic random loops and squiggles, in the guise of art, and not
> > respecting the pattern seams as defining elements of the quilt. Now if
> > this is the new norm and I am completely out of step with State of the
> > Art Free motion quilting, then so be it, I am out of step. If you look
> > at the other 25% of the quilts that were hand stitched. they used
> > overall quilting in the appropriate seam bordered elements of the
> > pattern and stayed within the confines of the seams and produced a
> > quilt that respected the pattern design and complimented that with
> > area quilting which enhanced the overall appearance. Out of probably
> > 35 Machine quilts, I think there were probably 2 or 3 that met the the
> > above criteria of respecting the seams, and not going over them
> > randomey, in an attempt to achieve, I don't know what. It is almost as
> > if people take a class on free motion quilting and then throw away all
> > the time honored traditions of using quilting and stippling within
> > area elements that respect the seam lines of the sewn pattern, and
> > throw themselves into the process of random placement of the needle on
> > autopilot. Thank you very much,but I think I will get on the other
> > bus, on this show.
> > So there you have it. My personal take on the recent, and not so happy
> > viewing of the state of the art of Machine quilting, as it pertains to
> > Knox County, Ohio. And once again, I hope that I have not stepped on
> > any toes here. Or otherwise raised any hackles.

> > John

What I was commenting on was the line of stitching in the quilting
passing over the joining of the piecing of the pattern on the quilt
top without any regard to the direction or any element of the design
of the pattern. Much like if you placed a large template of random
stitching over a traditional patterned quilt top and then followed the
template to sew together the three pieces of the top, batting, and
backing. The stitching was not done with any regard to the pattern of
the joined pieces, of the top. As if two different people had a hand
in the completion of the quilt, but neither one of them had any idea
what the other one was doing, as far as esthetics are concerned. It
just seemed so mindless as to design. I don't care about not having
enough money to hire a professional quilter who would look at the
design and decide where to put the stitching so as to not degrade the
whole  piece of work with careless placement of stitching across the
design lines of the pieced top. If the professional quilter was the
sort of person who would do that, that person is hardly a
professional. People have asked me to make furniture pieces that used
shortcuts, so as to produce a cheaper cost of the item. I declined to
do that sort of thing, and suggested they look elsewhere. It would be
better for me not to do the quilt at all, if that was the choice I was
given. I would rather do one or two quilts a year that I could afford
to have done the "right" way, than a whole closet full of this
malarkey, that I saw. Sorry for the strong statements, and I know
others might not have the same opinions as myself, but there you have
it. I am just saying what I would do, not what anybody else must or
should do. The exceptions, as stated by others was for utility quilts,
or pet bed quilts, or some other such use, but, hardly, for entry into
a quilt show.

John

 
 
 

Local quilt show: observations

Post by Donna in Idah » Mon, 17 Aug 2009 07:38:17


Sometimes quilt shows don't get as many entries as they would like.  Then
they start begging quilters to bring in quilts, any quilt, to fill the
space.  I've seen that at some quilt shows in our area.  That's one reason
you'll see quilts with the type of quilting you're talking about.  They are
there to fill space and weren't even intended to be a quilt show entry!

Donna in SW idaho

Quote:
>The exceptions, as stated by others was for utility quilts,
>or pet bed quilts, or some other such use, but, hardly, for entry into
>a quilt show.
>John

 
 
 

Local quilt show: observations

Post by Anne Roger » Mon, 17 Aug 2009 07:50:20


When you get a quilt professionally quilted, it's usually at least twice
as much to get custom quilting, i.e. the type that respects the design
of the quilt, than it is to get edge to edge quilting.

Some quilts suit edge to edge quilting, some don't! I've only once sent
a quilt out to a quilter, I don't think I have a picture to hand
unfortunately, but it is a quilt with pretty much all medium value
fabrics, with no large areas of plain fabric. As it was queen size and I
wasn't sure ditch quilting would quite make it quilted enough to hold it
together, an allover design seemed to make sense. I browsed designs that
my friend had available and found a wonderful grape design, which
totally fitted in with the patterned fabric of the quilt, which was
grapes too. We chose a thread that would neither stand out too much, or
vanish completely and I'm thrilled with the result.

I now I have a problem as I've got two queen sized quilts that would be
ruined by the kind of quilting you describe and ditch quilting would not
be sufficient either, one I haven't even finished the borders, it's a
large 64 point mariners compass, but once I realised the issues I would
have quilting it, I stopped working on it.

I suspect a similar dilema is faced by the makers of the quilts you saw,
whether they are consious of it or not.

Cheers
Anne

 
 
 

Local quilt show: observations

Post by Ragmop Sand » Mon, 17 Aug 2009 08:28:12


Howdy!

You like what you like, John, and that's just fine.  ;-)

Often in my quilts, which are quilted carefully & professionally by
one Sandy Ellison, I quilt over the seam lines.  I like the quilt to
be one big piece, side to side, edge to edge, top to bottom.  I esp.
like
to quilt circles or triangles that entwine & over-lap, definitely not
sticking w/in the perimeter of the block(s).   My books of historic &/
or
antiques quilts show this to be a traditional  & acceptable (look at
the
winners' ribbons!) way of doing things in the big wide quilting world.
  Some of the smaller quilt shows have some of the most exquisite
quilts.
That's where the quilter was comfortable showing it; cool.  And some
of
the big shows I've been to, including The Really Big Quilt Show in
Houston,
have displayed some "winners" that made me wonder, "What the h#ll
were they drinking when they judged this category?!?"
  I'm always amused (I've chosen "amused" rather than "perplexed" or
"disappointed") when I go to one of the mid-size local shows and note
that
"all these gals had their quilts quilted by the same business quilters
w/
their limited imagination".  Also note who all took the same class &
made
nearly identical products. <g>
  I don't like sloppy quilting.   Also don't like that so much
chocolate is fattening.
I've learned to live with it.  ;-D
  As a handquilter and quilting artist, I do believe that "quilting
makes the quilt".

Cheers!
R/Sandy - on a borrowed laptop (Linux Ubuntu) that I'm pretty sure I
don't
                    really care for...


Quote:

> > Hi, John! I'm neither offended nor hackle-raised nor anything of the
> > sort. And it might be nonsense to comment on something you've seen and
> > I haven't. That said...

* friendly snipping of original brilliant post where
  John Started It!
Quote:
> > > That stated, herein follows a brief recounting of todays visit to the
> > >  And once again, I hope that I have not stepped on
> > > any toes here. Or otherwise raised any hackles.

> > > John

> What I was commenting on was the line of stitching in the quilting
> passing over the joining of the piecing of the pattern on the quilt
> top without any regard to the direction or any element of the design
> of the pattern. Much like if you placed a large template of random
> stitching over a traditional patterned quilt top and then followed the
> template to sew together the three pieces of the top, batting, and
> backing. The stitching was not done with any regard to the pattern of
> the joined pieces, of the top. As if two different people had a hand
> in the completion of the quilt, but neither one of them had any idea
> what the other one was doing, as far as esthetics are concerned. It
> just seemed so mindless as to design. I don't care about not having
> enough money to hire a professional quilter who would look at the
> design and decide where to put the stitching so as to not degrade the
> whole ?piece of work with careless placement of stitching across the
> design lines of the pieced top. If the professional quilter was the
> sort of person who would do that, that person is hardly a
> professional. People have asked me to make furniture pieces that used
> shortcuts, so as to produce a cheaper cost of the item. I declined to
> do that sort of thing, and suggested they look elsewhere. It would be
> better for me not to do the quilt at all, if that was the choice I was
> given. I would rather do one or two quilts a year that I could afford
> to have done the "right" way, than a whole closet full of this
> malarkey, that I saw. Sorry for the strong statements, and I know
> others might not have the same opinions as myself, but there you have
> it. I am just saying what I would do, not what anybody else must or
> should do. The exceptions, as stated by others was for utility quilts,
> or pet bed quilts, or some other such use, but, hardly, for entry into
> a quilt show.

> John

 
 
 

Local quilt show: observations

Post by Sand » Mon, 17 Aug 2009 10:03:53


I've had two quilts professionally quilted. The first was a queen-sized
(to the floor) quilt that I just didn't want to tackle -- that was about
7-8 years ago. The pattern of the piecing was so busy that an all-over
made sense -- still does.

The second was a quilt I hated by the time I'd finished it (*bad*
instructions, much more complicated than they should have been), and a
long-armer who is a friend of mine asked if she could use it to practice
for when she did her own in the same pattern. She did a custom job for a
very low (unreasonably so!) price, and I'm very happy with it.

These days I tend to do smaller quilts, and I quilt them myself as my
confidence increases. I think some quilts are great with all-over
patterns, but others demand something more special. I used to think that
the only way to quilt was to do each block individually, and I still
think some quilts are best done that way. However, others lend
themselves to other ways. There's room for all of them in "quilt-land",
just as there's room for appliqu , piecing, art quilts and all of the
variations of each.
--
Sandy in Henderson, near Las Vegas
sw.foster1 (at) gmail (dot) com (remove/change the obvious)
http://www.sandymike.net