Marking Michelle's quilt top

Marking Michelle's quilt top

Post by Patt » Wed, 19 Aug 2009 15:26:19



I bought my pounce ingredients last year, after encouragement from
reports here:  I haven't even opened the packet.  I feel rushed and
short of time, but I suppose I just use my time wastefully?  There are
several 'really must do' things to try when I get back from my little
holiday.


writes

Quote:
>I've been using a method that uses the Golden Threads paper and a pounce pad
>which looks like a blackboard eraser that has chalk inside.
>I trace my design on to the paper.  Then I remove the thread from my
>machine.  I stitch the design on the paper making holes just close enough
>together to not perforate the paper completely.  To mark the quilt, pin the
>paper with the bottom side up.....so it's the bumpy side where the holes
>were punched through.  Then rub the pounce pad (don't pounce...rub) over the
>paper so the bumpy holes grab the chalk out of the "eraser".   The chalk
>brushes off after quilting.  There is also a type of chalk that irons off.
>"Miracle Chalk" is the name, I believe.   Google it.
>This works nicely for a couple reasons.  First, you practice the design with
>your machine to get a rhythm and muscle memory for the design.  You can also
>pin several layers of paper together and get several templates if you think
>you'll need them. (But you can use one several times.)  I also like the fact
>that I can mark my design as the quilt is on the bed of the machine just
>before I sew it.  Lay down the paper, swipe the eraser and then stitch away.

--
Best Regards
pat on the hill
 
 
 

Marking Michelle's quilt top

Post by Sartorresartu » Wed, 19 Aug 2009 16:45:39


The magic pounce is good stuf  (NAYY, just doing my job as Gadget
Queen).  It seems to stay on well and does iron off 'like it says on
the tin'.  I haven't got the hang of the sewmachine method of making
the pattern, but now I see where I was going wrong.  Doing it smooth
side up closes all the pores.  Duh!  thank you for that.  Shall
experiment now...

I somwetimes cut a stencil using both a double bladed stencil cutter
(mind your under knuckles when cutting thick plastic, ouchies!) and a
hot poker-soldering iron thingy.  Remember to put in loads of little
bridges or the holes fall out, but otherwise a feather or cable repeat
can be done in no time.  The joy of this is if you make a mistake with
the marking it is easy to erase.  With pencils and chalks etc you
might have to resort to different colours where the mistakes are,
until you can wash them out later.

Add to that, cut stencils can be used again and again, so I hang them
on the wall for future use.

Golden Threads paper is good for tracing big designs and auditioning
them on the top before marking.  I make a full-sized pattern and trace
it off on the wholecloth fabrics.  Not so wonderful on dark colours
though,even with a lightbox (OK, patio window and sunshine, same
thing!)

I can't get the point of a hera marker.  I've even watched people who
'know' how to use one making their marks.  They don't seem to stay on
for long and maybe my eyesight isn't good enough, but I can't see the
marks well enough in the***place.  I use mine for poking and
prodding and sometimes for marking a very temporary line to indicate
quarterings or such like.  Another downside is that you have to mark
the quilt already sandwiched, so unless you are drawing round a
template or marking as you go ( on a floor frame for example) it won't
stay on during the backing and batting process.

It might have something to do with the pudginess of battings as well.
More experimentation needed.  Back to the lab...

Nel
(Gadget Queen)


Quote:
> I bought my pounce ingredients last year, after encouragement from
> reports here: ?I haven't even opened the packet. ?I feel rushed and
> short of time, but I suppose I just use my time wastefully? ?There are
> several 'really must do' things to try when I get back from my little
> holiday.


> writes

> >I've been using a method that uses the Golden Threads paper and a pounce pad
> >which looks like a blackboard eraser that has chalk inside.
> >I trace my design on to the paper. ?Then I remove the thread from my
> >machine. ?I stitch the design on the paper making holes just close enough
> >together to not perforate the paper completely. ?To mark the quilt, pin the
> >paper with the bottom side up.....so it's the bumpy side where the holes
> >were punched through. ?Then rub the pounce pad (don't pounce...rub) over the
> >paper so the bumpy holes grab the chalk out of the "eraser". ? The chalk
> >brushes off after quilting. ?There is also a type of chalk that irons off.
> >"Miracle Chalk" is the name, I believe. ? Google it.
> >This works nicely for a couple reasons. ?First, you practice the design with
> >your machine to get a rhythm and muscle memory for the design. ?You can also
> >pin several layers of paper together and get several templates if you think
> >you'll need them. (But you can use one several times.) ?I also like the fact
> >that I can mark my design as the quilt is on the bed of the machine just
> >before I sew it. ?Lay down the paper, swipe the eraser and then stitch away.

> --
> Best Regards
> pat on the hill- Hide quoted text -

> - Show quoted text -


 
 
 

Marking Michelle's quilt top

Post by Sally Swindell » Wed, 19 Aug 2009 18:22:02


Just remembered - I bought some 'pounce chalk' at Malvern last year (do
you remember Pat, you bought some too I think - have you forgotten yours
too?!)

I also have one of the little coloured chalk rollers that look like a
lipstick case, and I've got some water soluble pencils too - so  should
win one way or another!

Thanks for all the reminders - brain a little dead at the moment.

Sally at the Seaside~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~uk
http://community.webshots.com/user/sallyswin

Quote:

> I've been using a method that uses the Golden Threads paper and a pounce pad
> which looks like a blackboard eraser that has chalk inside.
> I trace my design on to the paper.  Then I remove the thread from my
> machine.  I stitch the design on the paper making holes just close enough
> together to not perforate the paper completely.  To mark the quilt, pin the
> paper with the bottom side up.....so it's the bumpy side where the holes
> were punched through.  Then rub the pounce pad (don't pounce...rub) over the
> paper so the bumpy holes grab the chalk out of the "eraser".   The chalk
> brushes off after quilting.  There is also a type of chalk that irons off.
> "Miracle Chalk" is the name, I believe.   Google it.
> This works nicely for a couple reasons.  First, you practice the design with
> your machine to get a rhythm and muscle memory for the design.  You can also
> pin several layers of paper together and get several templates if you think
> you'll need them. (But you can use one several times.)  I also like the fact
> that I can mark my design as the quilt is on the bed of the machine just
> before I sew it.  Lay down the paper, swipe the eraser and then stitch away.

 
 
 

Marking Michelle's quilt top

Post by Sally Swindell » Wed, 19 Aug 2009 18:23:01


So you hadn't forgotten it (see my previous post written before I'd read
yours).

Sally at the Seaside~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~uk
http://community.webshots.com/user/sallyswin

Quote:

> I bought my pounce ingredients last year, after encouragement from
> reports here:  I haven't even opened the packet.  I feel rushed and
> short of time, but I suppose I just use my time wastefully?  There are
> several 'really must do' things to try when I get back from my little
> holiday.


> writes
>> I've been using a method that uses the Golden Threads paper and a
>> pounce pad
>> which looks like a blackboard eraser that has chalk inside.
>> I trace my design on to the paper.  Then I remove the thread from my
>> machine.  I stitch the design on the paper making holes just close enough
>> together to not perforate the paper completely.  To mark the quilt,
>> pin the
>> paper with the bottom side up.....so it's the bumpy side where the holes
>> were punched through.  Then rub the pounce pad (don't pounce...rub)
>> over the
>> paper so the bumpy holes grab the chalk out of the "eraser".   The chalk
>> brushes off after quilting.  There is also a type of chalk that irons
>> off.
>> "Miracle Chalk" is the name, I believe.   Google it.
>> This works nicely for a couple reasons.  First, you practice the
>> design with
>> your machine to get a rhythm and muscle memory for the design.  You
>> can also
>> pin several layers of paper together and get several templates if you
>> think
>> you'll need them. (But you can use one several times.)  I also like
>> the fact
>> that I can mark my design as the quilt is on the bed of the machine just
>> before I sew it.  Lay down the paper, swipe the eraser and then stitch
>> away.

 
 
 

Marking Michelle's quilt top

Post by Robert » Wed, 19 Aug 2009 20:22:17


When marking is essential, I use a mechanical chalk pencil. Works fine
with templates, comes in lots of colors. Easy to swap the "leads". But
I do avoid marking.
While the chalk hold up pretty well, you can't mark the entire top,
only a section at a time. So no tracing from a book, for example. If I
want to do that, I use Press & Seal, tracing the design onto the
plastic with a silver permanent pen (Pigma). Let it dry well. The
plastic sticks where you want it and tears off afterwards.
If I need to do that more than a dozen times or so, it gets tedious.
So I also use tissue paper, tracing onto one sheet, then stitching
over the traced line through 6-10 sheets, with no thread in the
needle. Also tears away easily.
Roberta in D

On Mon, 17 Aug 2009 14:59:04 -0500, "Polly Esther"

Quote:

>Recently, I saw this comment from Michelle
>    <<The biggest reason for this is that I have never found a method to
>> mark the  quilt yet and again, don't have the confidence to just wing it
>> without
>> marking first.>>
>Please climb in here and tell Michelle what you use to mark a quilting
>pattern on a quilt top.  Mine is probably the most primitive.  I use Crayola
>Washable felt tip pins.  I do Not leave it 'in' for very long and I do wash
>my quilts when finished.  So far, this simple method has worked quite well.
>    [A warning:  one summer I used one of those blue water-soluble expensive
>pens to mark some embroidery for traveling.  The heat in the car did make
>those lines a very permanent black.]
>    Sometimes for just a general line of how far to curve this way and then
>lean the other way, I use plain old white blackboard chalk.  Kind of messy
>but easy to remove.  Polly

 
 
 

Marking Michelle's quilt top

Post by Alliso » Wed, 19 Aug 2009 22:23:50


This is what I do too, especially for filler patterns.  For some
trickier patterns, ie feathers, I might practice with pencil and paper
first to make sure I like the end result  - easier to erase than to
unstitch. :)  I have also occasionally used a marker with 'disappearing'
ink - when used lightly the marks are gone by the next day.

Allison


Quote:
> The hassle of marking quilts was what led me to investigate the
> different free motion techniques that require NO MARKING.  It is so
> much easier and faster.  I got the best ideas from
> http://www.patsythompsondesigns.com but I also bought a book called
> "Freehand Filler Patterns," by Sue Patten, that was a tremendous help
> to me.  (And John, she does hers by staying inside the seam lines!!!)

> On Mon, 17 Aug 2009 14:59:04 -0500, "Polly Esther"

>> Please climb in here and tell Michelle what you use to mark a quilting
>> pattern on a quilt top.
> Carole D. - Retired and loving it in the foothills of NW Georgia

> My quilts, crafts, QIs, and more - http://home.windstream.net/caroledoyle

 
 
 

Marking Michelle's quilt top

Post by ME-Jud » Thu, 20 Aug 2009 02:17:50


Besides the black markers, I have also used a Pigma Fabric/Scrapbooking pen
on the P'n'Seal - used a color not that far off from the background color.
Also, check out the Press'n'Seal FREEZER type - it's blue instead of clear
and lighter colors show up better on it. (You can still see through it!)
I'm a P'n'S *** <G> especially :
    to center designs in a plain square (you can mark the square on it, or
draw a big X to connect your corners to help position it.
    to use for laying a design out on the borders -- helps when you need to
extend the design just a bit OR reduce it's length just a bit. Start in the
corners and work toward the centers.
ME-Judy


Quote:
> The last time I tried machining through Press 'n' Seal was on a white
> background. I had marked with a black pigma (Micron) pen and left it
> overnight to dry well, but when the needle went through some of the black
> was transferred through. I ended up appliqueing leaves in that area
> instead of quilting them.

> What sort of pen do you use? I have been saving Press 'n' Seal for darker
> quilts, but am about to start quilting a pastel coloured baby quilt, and
> it would be the easiest method. Perhaps I should just have a practice at
> drawing daisies freehand.

> Sally at the Seaside~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~uk
> http://www.FoundCollection.com/

 
 
 

Marking Michelle's quilt top

Post by Sherr » Thu, 20 Aug 2009 12:28:30



Quote:
> Recently, I saw this comment from Michelle
> ? ? <<The biggest reason for this is that I have never found a method to> mark the ?quilt yet and again, don't have the confidence to just wing it
> > without
> > marking first.>>

> Please climb in here and tell Michelle what you use to mark a quilting
> pattern on a quilt top. ?Mine is probably the most primitive. ?I use Crayola
> Washable felt tip pins. ?I do Not leave it 'in' for very long and I do wash
> my quilts when finished. ?So far, this simple method has worked quite well.
> ? ? [A warning: ?one summer I used one of those blue water-soluble expensive
> pens to mark some embroidery for traveling. ?The heat in the car did make
> those lines a very permanent black.]
> ? ? Sometimes for just a general line of how far to curve this way and then
> lean the other way, I use plain old white blackboard chalk. ?Kind of messy
> but easy to remove. ?Polly

Hi Polly -- that quote was from me, not Michelle. So thank you for
starting
this thread!
I've tried stencils, with a pounce pad. It works okay, except where my
hand
rests sometimes it rubs off. I can't find dark chalk to go in it
either.
I'm just amazed at the people who trace their designs on their tops
with
a glass top table, etc. I tried that, and it was a miserable failure.
It was a
very large quilt. I couldn't see through it very well. I just couldn't
manhandle
the quilt and lost my temper and gave up on that one.
I tried the magic purple disappearing pen. It magically RE-appeared.
But it
finally washed out. (humidity also really affects that one)

Here's one I'm curious about. (I am a sucker for a gimmick)...The
aerosol spray stuff that you use with stencils.

So my latest favorite method is stitching 1/4 inch from the seams.
Then doing
the pounce thing on the borders and sashing.

(I see you rolling your eyballs. Stop that! They might stick. You know
who you
are. :-)  :-)  :-)

Thanks again, Polly. I'm trying the crayola markers.

Sherry

 
 
 

Marking Michelle's quilt top

Post by Polly Esthe » Thu, 20 Aug 2009 13:02:23


It's not my fault.  My *** pressure prescription very clearly says:  may
cause confusion.
    And... Good Lord Almighty.  Sherry. We're not putting the whole quilt on
the light source - box, window or whatever.  Just tracing the design on
something and Then transferring it to the quilt top.
    Yes.  Magic disappearing pens do re-appear.
    We are not rolling out eyeballs.  Our mothers warned us about that.
Just want to get you to where you need to be.
    And so we shall.  No matter what it takes.
        As to the Craylola washables - stay away from:  sunshine, irons and
warm QI bellies.  Polly

"Sherry" <Hi Polly -- that quote was from me, not Michelle. So thank you for
starting this thread!
I've tried stencils, with a pounce pad. It works okay, except where my
hand rests sometimes it rubs off. I can't find dark chalk to go in it
either. I'm just amazed at the people who trace their designs on their tops
with a glass top table, etc. I tried that, and it was a miserable failure.
It was a very large quilt. I couldn't see through it very well. I just
couldn't
manhandle the quilt and lost my temper and gave up on that one.
I tried the magic purple disappearing pen. It magically RE-appeared.
But it finally washed out. (humidity also really affects that one)

Here's one I'm curious about. (I am a sucker for a gimmick)...The
aerosol spray stuff that you use with stencils.

So my latest favorite method is stitching 1/4 inch from the seams.
Then doing the pounce thing on the borders and sashing.

(I see you rolling your eyballs. Stop that! They might stick. You know
who you
are. :-)  :-)  :-)

Thanks again, Polly. I'm trying the crayola markers.

Sherry

 
 
 

Marking Michelle's quilt top

Post by Joann » Thu, 20 Aug 2009 13:43:59


I would NOT use the spray stencil stuff. My friend did and it ruined her
quilt top. Now it could have been because it sat around for months
before she finished it and tried to wash it out but I can't be sure.
Also she said it made a mess when spraying and if you do use it make
sure your outside or very ventalated area.
Joanna
Quote:


>> Recently, I saw this comment from Michelle
>>     <<The biggest reason for this is that I have never found a method to> mark the  quilt yet and again, don't have the confidence to just wing it
>>> without
>>> marking first.>>
>> Please climb in here and tell Michelle what you use to mark a quilting
>> pattern on a quilt top.  Mine is probably the most primitive.  I use Crayola
>> Washable felt tip pins.  I do Not leave it 'in' for very long and I do wash
>> my quilts when finished.  So far, this simple method has worked quite well.
>>     [A warning:  one summer I used one of those blue water-soluble expensive
>> pens to mark some embroidery for traveling.  The heat in the car did make
>> those lines a very permanent black.]
>>     Sometimes for just a general line of how far to curve this way and then
>> lean the other way, I use plain old white blackboard chalk.  Kind of messy
>> but easy to remove.  Polly

> Hi Polly -- that quote was from me, not Michelle. So thank you for
> starting
> this thread!
> I've tried stencils, with a pounce pad. It works okay, except where my
> hand
> rests sometimes it rubs off. I can't find dark chalk to go in it
> either.
> I'm just amazed at the people who trace their designs on their tops
> with
> a glass top table, etc. I tried that, and it was a miserable failure.
> It was a
> very large quilt. I couldn't see through it very well. I just couldn't
> manhandle
> the quilt and lost my temper and gave up on that one.
> I tried the magic purple disappearing pen. It magically RE-appeared.
> But it
> finally washed out. (humidity also really affects that one)

> Here's one I'm curious about. (I am a sucker for a gimmick)...The
> aerosol spray stuff that you use with stencils.

> So my latest favorite method is stitching 1/4 inch from the seams.
> Then doing
> the pounce thing on the borders and sashing.

> (I see you rolling your eyballs. Stop that! They might stick. You know
> who you
> are. :-)  :-)  :-)

> Thanks again, Polly. I'm trying the crayola markers.

> Sherry