question from a newbie re applique technique

question from a newbie re applique technique

Post by Anne Jenso » Sun, 02 May 2004 03:39:10



I have been enjoying reading this newsgroup for a while and never had
the nerve de-lurk until now, but I have a question some of you may find odd.
Does anyone have a technique to do applique with one hand? You see, I
enjoy quilting (just in the learning phase presently) and I love looking
at applique work, but because of an accident when I was a small child, I
really only have one hand to work with.
I took an applique course and just could never master the technique of
turning the material and getting my needle in there.......
Does anyone have any advice or should I stick with the log cabin and be
happy about that.
 
 
 

question from a newbie re applique technique

Post by froo » Sun, 02 May 2004 03:49:11


Hi, Anne! I'm sure others will have more advice, but I do want to welcome
you to the newsgroup! This is a great group of people, full of information
and support and silliness.

Perhaps a technique where you back the applique piece with fabric or
interfacing (so you would have a finished edge) would work. Maybe you could
even put the background fabric in a hoop while you work on attaching the
applique.

And, there's always machine applique, with fusibles.

--
Wendy
http://griffinsflight.com/Quilting/quilt1.htm
de-fang email address to reply


Quote:
> I have been enjoying reading this newsgroup for a while and never had
> the nerve de-lurk until now, but I have a question some of you may find
odd.
> Does anyone have a technique to do applique with one hand? You see, I
> enjoy quilting (just in the learning phase presently) and I love looking
> at applique work, but because of an accident when I was a small child, I
> really only have one hand to work with.
> I took an applique course and just could never master the technique of
> turning the material and getting my needle in there.......
> Does anyone have any advice or should I stick with the log cabin and be
> happy about that.


 
 
 

question from a newbie re applique technique

Post by Diana Curti » Sun, 02 May 2004 04:21:52


Welcome to the group!
How do you feel about machine applique?
Diana


Quote:
> I have been enjoying reading this newsgroup for a while and never had
> the nerve de-lurk until now, but I have a question some of you may find
odd.
> Does anyone have a technique to do applique with one hand? You see, I
> enjoy quilting (just in the learning phase presently) and I love looking
> at applique work, but because of an accident when I was a small child, I
> really only have one hand to work with.
> I took an applique course and just could never master the technique of
> turning the material and getting my needle in there.......
> Does anyone have any advice or should I stick with the log cabin and be
> happy about that.

 
 
 

question from a newbie re applique technique

Post by Anne Jenso » Sun, 02 May 2004 04:33:25


Quote:

> Welcome to the group!
> How do you feel about machine applique?
> Diana



>>I have been enjoying reading this newsgroup for a while and never had
>>the nerve de-lurk until now, but I have a question some of you may find

> odd.

I'm new to this whole applique experience so I don't know what machine
applique is. Would you describe it for me?
Quote:
>>Does anyone have a technique to do applique with one hand? You see, I
>>enjoy quilting (just in the learning phase presently) and I love looking
>>at applique work, but because of an accident when I was a small child, I
>>really only have one hand to work with.
>>I took an applique course and just could never master the technique of
>>turning the material and getting my needle in there.......
>>Does anyone have any advice or should I stick with the log cabin and be
>>happy about that.

 
 
 

question from a newbie re applique technique

Post by Anne Jenso » Sun, 02 May 2004 05:00:02


Quote:

> Welcome to the group!
> How do you feel about machine applique?
> Diana



>>I have been enjoying reading this newsgroup for a while and never had
>>the nerve de-lurk until now, but I have a question some of you may find

> odd.

I'm new to this whole applique experience so I don't know what machine
applique is. Would you describe it for me?
Quote:
>>Does anyone have a technique to do applique with one hand? You see, I
>>enjoy quilting (just in the learning phase presently) and I love looking
>>at applique work, but because of an accident when I was a small child, I
>>really only have one hand to work with.
>>I took an applique course and just could never master the technique of
>>turning the material and getting my needle in there.......
>>Does anyone have any advice or should I stick with the log cabin and be
>>happy about that.

 
 
 

question from a newbie re applique technique

Post by Anne Jenso » Sun, 02 May 2004 05:00:30


Quote:

> Welcome to the group!
> How do you feel about machine applique?
> Diana



>>I have been enjoying reading this newsgroup for a while and never had
>>the nerve de-lurk until now, but I have a question some of you may find

> odd.

I'm new to this whole applique experience so I don't know what machine
applique is. Would you describe it for me?
Quote:
>>Does anyone have a technique to do applique with one hand? You see, I
>>enjoy quilting (just in the learning phase presently) and I love looking
>>at applique work, but because of an accident when I was a small child, I
>>really only have one hand to work with.
>>I took an applique course and just could never master the technique of
>>turning the material and getting my needle in there.......
>>Does anyone have any advice or should I stick with the log cabin and be
>>happy about that.

 
 
 

question from a newbie re applique technique

Post by Diana Curti » Sun, 02 May 2004 05:16:04


There are a number of different ways to machine applique but one of the
easiest is to first have a pattern. I like to trace the different pieces
onto fusible web, then iron the webbing to the back of the material it needs
to  be cut of. Cut out and assemble the bits like a puzzle onto the
background fabric, and using the machine set on satin stitch * a tight zig
zag* outline each piece with a thread that matches that piece. It helps to
put a piece of printer paper under all the layers while sewing. Thats a very
bare bones way to describe it. I'm hoping someone else has urls to direct
you to better descriptions or methods.
Diana


Quote:

> > Welcome to the group!
> > How do you feel about machine applique?
> > Diana



> >>I have been enjoying reading this newsgroup for a while and never had
> >>the nerve de-lurk until now, but I have a question some of you may find

> > odd.

> I'm new to this whole applique experience so I don't know what machine
> applique is. Would you describe it for me?

> >>Does anyone have a technique to do applique with one hand? You see, I
> >>enjoy quilting (just in the learning phase presently) and I love looking
> >>at applique work, but because of an accident when I was a small child, I
> >>really only have one hand to work with.
> >>I took an applique course and just could never master the technique of
> >>turning the material and getting my needle in there.......
> >>Does anyone have any advice or should I stick with the log cabin and be
> >>happy about that.

 
 
 

question from a newbie re applique technique

Post by Polly Esthe » Sun, 02 May 2004 05:50:00


Anne, I think you would greatly benefit with in-person help by someone who
experienced at appliqu and who also is good at teaching. It ain't
necessarily so that someone who can do something can also teach it. A friend
of mine and my sister both had accidents and casts from fingertips to their
shoulders when they had new babies. Both managed to change diapers on
wiggling new babies and that was back when we had to use safety pins - none
of that peel-off sticky tape.  At least appliqu doesn't wiggle. Well, it
might wiggle a bit but it won't yell at you. Is there a quilting shop where
you could ask for some help to figure it out? a sewing machine shop? A local
quilting group? I'm sure there's a way.  Welcome, and we are glad to have
you. Polly


Quote:

> > Welcome to the group!
> > How do you feel about machine applique?
> > Diana



> >>I have been enjoying reading this newsgroup for a while and never had
> >>the nerve de-lurk until now, but I have a question some of you may find

> > odd.

> I'm new to this whole applique experience so I don't know what machine
> applique is. Would you describe it for me?

> >>Does anyone have a technique to do applique with one hand? You see, I
> >>enjoy quilting (just in the learning phase presently) and I love looking
> >>at applique work, but because of an accident when I was a small child, I
> >>really only have one hand to work with.
> >>I took an applique course and just could never master the technique of
> >>turning the material and getting my needle in there.......
> >>Does anyone have any advice or should I stick with the log cabin and be
> >>happy about that.

 
 
 

question from a newbie re applique technique

Post by Pigle » Sun, 02 May 2004 05:59:09


I hadn't ever thought about how to do that, but thinking about it....

Here's a possibility, if you want to do hand applique rather than machine
applique, that seems as though it might work.

Cut fusible interfacing just a hair smaller than the actual size/shape you
need.  Press it on the fabric and cut out the applique piece with seam
allowance added.  

(Here's the hard part) when you press the seam allowance under (fusing it
down---make sure you only press the seam allowance or your iron will stick
to the interfacing), make sure you don't fold at the edge of the
interfacing, but about three threads out (or whatever your "hair" was) so
that your finished folded edge does *not* have interfacing in it.  Then use
the fusible bit to press it to the cloth--everything will be stuck down
except the outside edges, where your seam allowance is folded under.

Now put it in the hoop so that you can stitch one handed, and stitch the
edges down just as you would otherwise (as invisible a stitch as you can).
Having left the three threads/"hair" means you're not having to push the
needle thru the interfacing, so it should be fairly easy to do.

--pig


Quote:
> I have been enjoying reading this newsgroup for a while and never had
> the nerve de-lurk until now, but I have a question some of you may find odd.
> Does anyone have a technique to do applique with one hand? You see, I
> enjoy quilting (just in the learning phase presently) and I love looking
> at applique work, but because of an accident when I was a small child, I
> really only have one hand to work with.
> I took an applique course and just could never master the technique of
> turning the material and getting my needle in there.......
> Does anyone have any advice or should I stick with the log cabin and be
> happy about that.

 
 
 

question from a newbie re applique technique

Post by Polly Esthe » Sun, 02 May 2004 06:13:34


It just might be that the cute little Clover iron might be helpful. If you
try one, please do get out a heavy coffee mug to rest it in. The little
holder they come with is annoying and the Clover iron is not built for
dropping on the floor. I'm sure.  Polly


Quote:
> I hadn't ever thought about how to do that, but thinking about it....

> Here's a possibility, if you want to do hand applique rather than machine
> applique, that seems as though it might work.

> Cut fusible interfacing just a hair smaller than the actual size/shape you
> need.  Press it on the fabric and cut out the applique piece with seam
> allowance added.

> (Here's the hard part) when you press the seam allowance under (fusing it
> down---make sure you only press the seam allowance or your iron will stick
> to the interfacing), make sure you don't fold at the edge of the
> interfacing, but about three threads out (or whatever your "hair" was) so
> that your finished folded edge does *not* have interfacing in it.  Then
use
> the fusible bit to press it to the cloth--everything will be stuck down
> except the outside edges, where your seam allowance is folded under.

> Now put it in the hoop so that you can stitch one handed, and stitch the
> edges down just as you would otherwise (as invisible a stitch as you can).
> Having left the three threads/"hair" means you're not having to push the
> needle thru the interfacing, so it should be fairly easy to do.

> --pig


> > I have been enjoying reading this newsgroup for a while and never had
> > the nerve de-lurk until now, but I have a question some of you may find
odd.
> > Does anyone have a technique to do applique with one hand? You see, I
> > enjoy quilting (just in the learning phase presently) and I love looking
> > at applique work, but because of an accident when I was a small child, I
> > really only have one hand to work with.
> > I took an applique course and just could never master the technique of
> > turning the material and getting my needle in there.......
> > Does anyone have any advice or should I stick with the log cabin and be
> > happy about that.

 
 
 

question from a newbie re applique technique

Post by geor » Sun, 02 May 2004 06:49:12


If you prefer to work in-hand, I would try English paper piecing. Cut a
piece of paper to the exact shape you want your finished thing to be.
Cut the fabric with a 1/4 inch seam around that, and sew a basting
gathering stitch around the outside edge so you can gather the fabric
around the template paper. Pin this paper onto your  background fabric.
It should look like your work is finished to a casual glance. Now you
can sew the edges of the applique down in a normal manner without
worrying about needleturn and fussy holding. Once it's sewn down, you
can remove the pins, turn the piece over and cut the background fabric,
and now you can easily remove the paper.

I hope that makes sense. It's an extra bit of stitching to sew the
fabric covering on the paper, but it saves trying to hold it and needleturn.

The other option to actually stitching is to use water soluble glue.
Glue the edges of the fabric over the edge of the paper, and then glue
the paper to the background fabric. Saves pins. When you finish the
stitching, you can just soak in water and the glue dissolves. If you use
water soluble interfacing instead of paper, the whole thing will
dissolve, just leaving your neatly stitched fabric. But I'm not sure how
stiff the water soluble interfacing is and if it's sturdy enough for
this use.

-georg

 
 
 

question from a newbie re applique technique

Post by Sandy Foste » Sun, 02 May 2004 08:15:48




Quote:
> I have been enjoying reading this newsgroup for a while and never had
> the nerve de-lurk until now, but I have a question some of you may find odd.
> Does anyone have a technique to do applique with one hand? You see, I
> enjoy quilting (just in the learning phase presently) and I love looking
> at applique work, but because of an accident when I was a small child, I
> really only have one hand to work with.
> I took an applique course and just could never master the technique of
> turning the material and getting my needle in there.......
> Does anyone have any advice or should I stick with the log cabin and be
> happy about that.

I'm not much on hand applique, so I can't advise you. However, if you
aren't averse to machine applique, I'd advise getting Harriet Hargrave's
book, Mastering Machine Applique (it might be available at your local
library -- or maybe they can get is with interlibrary loan), to see
photos of how do either satin stitch applique or invisible ("mock-hand")
applique. She gives very good instructions. Welcome to the group! :)
--
Sandy in Henderson, near Las Vegas
my ISP is earthlink.net -- put sfoster1(at) in front
http://home.earthlink.net/~sfoster1
 
 
 

question from a newbie re applique technique

Post by Julia Altshule » Sun, 02 May 2004 09:51:56


I have the use of both hands so the following is speculation only, but
when I do hand applique, I use my left to hold the fabric taut and the
my right for the needle.  If you put the background fabric in a 6" hoop,
ironed the applique piece to freezer paper on the back, cut out with
1/8" seam allowance and pinned it to the background well, you could
steady the hoop to your table with clips or hold it with your knees.
Then do freezer paper applique, that is turn the seam allowance under
until the freezer paper is entirely encased.  Finally, make a slit in
the back and pull the freezer paper out.

--Lia

Quote:

> I have been enjoying reading this newsgroup for a while and never had
> the nerve de-lurk until now, but I have a question some of you may find
> odd.
> Does anyone have a technique to do applique with one hand? You see, I
> enjoy quilting (just in the learning phase presently) and I love looking
> at applique work, but because of an accident when I was a small child, I
> really only have one hand to work with.
> I took an applique course and just could never master the technique of
> turning the material and getting my needle in there.......
> Does anyone have any advice or should I stick with the log cabin and be
> happy about that.

 
 
 

question from a newbie re applique technique

Post by Patt » Sun, 02 May 2004 19:42:08


Hullo Anne and welcome
If you do want to appliqu by hand, I believe using a fusible backing,
sticking the piece down and sewing it on with a blanket stitch would be
the most straightforward for you to do with one good hand.
If you would prefer to use the fine, almost invisible stitches, then
doing the method described in another post where you sew the appliqu
piece to a thin backing and turn it through so that there are no raw
edges would almost certainly be the easiest for you.  In that case too,
though, I would stick the piece onto the background with a piece of
fusible (this time not necessary to cut to exact size and shape) or
fabric glue.
If you decide to do the fine hand stitching, then I suggest you use a
fine silk thread, it virtually disappears, it is beautiful to use.  Tie
a neat knot at the eye of the needle, otherwise the thread will keep
slipping out.  After the first stitch, the knot is aligned with the
needle and causes no snagging at all.
On the other hand, machine appliqu would mean that you could pin the
piece and not have to hold it at all.  There are several methods of
machine appliqu.  I think it would be best for you to get a book from
library or some other source, so that you could get illustrations as
well as any descriptions we might be able to give here.
Good luck.  I'm sure you'll find a way to suit you.  Have fun.
.


Quote:
>I have been enjoying reading this newsgroup for a while and never had
>the nerve de-lurk until now, but I have a question some of you may find
>odd.
>Does anyone have a technique to do applique with one hand? You see, I
>enjoy quilting (just in the learning phase presently) and I love
>looking at applique work, but because of an accident when I was a small
>child, I really only have one hand to work with.
>I took an applique course and just could never master the technique of
>turning the material and getting my needle in there.......
>Does anyone have any advice or should I stick with the log cabin and be
>happy about that.

--
Best Regards
pat on the hill
 
 
 

question from a newbie re applique technique

Post by Julia Altshule » Sun, 02 May 2004 21:11:08


Quote:

> Hullo Anne and welcome
> If you do want to appliqu by hand, I believe using a fusible backing,
> sticking the piece down and sewing it on with a blanket stitch would be
> the most straightforward for you to do with one good hand.

I gave this question to my engineer boyfriend this morning, and he came
up with exactly this solution.  Or rather, we talked about it, and he
wondered if fusibles would help, and I supplied the blanket stitch idea.
  He enjoys a good engineering problem, and this one fit the bill.  He
starts with the idea that this can be done.  Then he starts imagining
possibilities picturing the whole thing in his mind.

--Lia