The quilty part of my weekend (very long, but on-topic)

The quilty part of my weekend (very long, but on-topic)

Post by Deb » Wed, 16 Sep 1998 04:00:00



Hi y'all. Most of you know I spent the weekend attending a family funeral,
but I wanted to share with you something else that happened. I traveled to
the funeral with my parents (DH didn't go) and we stayed at my grandma's
house. I was telling the family about the group and Ruth and shared the
poem Ellen posted (lots of sniffles and moist eyes!) That got us talking
about quilting. I'm the only quilter in the family right now, the last was
my great-grandma McNeil. My grandma opened up the cedar chest and started
dragging out quilts I didn't know she had and my Aunt Susan brought some
from her house that I didn't know she had!
        There were 3 baby quilts, one made for my mom and one for each of her
brothers. These were made in the 1930s and '40s. Uncle Leroy's was pretty
far gone---lots of shredded patches. It alternated plain pink squares with
muslin squares embroidered with animals. Mom's was a whole cloth, pink on
one side and deep blue on the other, with lots of fancy quilting. My fave
was Uncle James', a scrappy nine-patch done in lots of different pinks and
blues with a wide pink border (granny must have liked pink!!) and the
prints were like the Aunt Gracies and Granny's Apron prints, only old.
        There was a really cool friendship quilt made for my great-aunt Maxine,
(now deceased). It was dated March 5, 1930. It was signed by lots of people
I know (in my grandma's generation) and lots more I didn't. The signed
album blocks were set on point and alternated with deep blue squares. It
was really interesting to see the different fabrics people chose and how
the names were embroidered. My great-aunt Gertie (her DH was the one who
died last week) was a twin, and she and her sister put their names together
in the same block instead of doing separate blocks. One block just said
Estelle, done in all-caps about 2" tall----a very confident,
everyone-knows-me sort of block! Then there was one with such small
lettering on such a busy background that we never *could* figure out the
name!!
        The most spectacular quilt was a twin-sized appliqu. There were vases of
Penn. Dutch-style tulips in pinks and purples with the very curvy stems,
leaves and vases done in 2 shades of green. the blocks were set on point
and separated with green sashing and there were fancy feathers and cables
quilted all around and every bit of the background was quilted with a 1/2"
grid of squares set on point. Wow!
        Last was my favorite. It was a quilt granny made for my Uncle James and
the only thing besides his clothes and car that he *rescued* from an
unhappy first marriage. It was large hexagons (about 3" across?) set
side-by-side and connected in the corners by little yellow squares on
point. Almost all the hexagons were stripes, checks or plaids. The whole
thing was finished with a wide yellow border and the binding was pieced
together from lots of different red and pink fabrics. Very bright, and
scrappy with a surprisingly modern graphic look! It looked like something I
would make myself!! :-))
        I know this is long, (congrats if you made it to the end), but I knew
there would be those of you here who would understand how cool this was to
me and that it was a real bright spot in an otherwise dreary, depressing
weekend. Then when I stumbled in the door about 7:00 Sunday evening, the
house was cleaner than when I left, there was a big bouquet of wild flowers
on the dining room table and a hot supper on the stove. Got to love my
dearest darlin'. :-)
        Thanks for letting me ramble.
--
Deb
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Flats/4237/
 
 
 

The quilty part of my weekend (very long, but on-topic)

Post by Ruth Ponti » Wed, 16 Sep 1998 04:00:00


Deb,
   Just goes to show that the all the love put into a quilt lasts a long
time and works in ways we can't predict. Thank you so much for sharing
your family quilts with us.

Ruth

Quote:

> Hi y'all. Most of you know I spent the weekend attending a family funeral,
> but I wanted to share with you something else that happened. I traveled to
> the funeral with my parents (DH didn't go) and we stayed at my grandma's
> house. I was telling the family about the group and Ruth and shared the
> poem Ellen posted (lots of sniffles and moist eyes!) That got us talking
> about quilting. I'm the only quilter in the family right now, the last was
> my great-grandma McNeil. My grandma opened up the cedar chest and started
> dragging out quilts I didn't know she had and my Aunt Susan brought some
> from her house that I didn't know she had!
>         There were 3 baby quilts, one made for my mom and one for each of her
> brothers. These were made in the 1930s and '40s. Uncle Leroy's was pretty
> far gone---lots of shredded patches. It alternated plain pink squares with
> muslin squares embroidered with animals. Mom's was a whole cloth, pink on
> one side and deep blue on the other, with lots of fancy quilting. My fave
> was Uncle James', a scrappy nine-patch done in lots of different pinks and
> blues with a wide pink border (granny must have liked pink!!) and the
> prints were like the Aunt Gracies and Granny's Apron prints, only old.
>         There was a really cool friendship quilt made for my great-aunt
Maxine,
> (now deceased). It was dated March 5, 1930. It was signed by lots of people
> I know (in my grandma's generation) and lots more I didn't. The signed
> album blocks were set on point and alternated with deep blue squares. It
> was really interesting to see the different fabrics people chose and how
> the names were embroidered. My great-aunt Gertie (her DH was the one who
> died last week) was a twin, and she and her sister put their names together
> in the same block instead of doing separate blocks. One block just said
> Estelle, done in all-caps about 2" tall----a very confident,
> everyone-knows-me sort of block! Then there was one with such small
> lettering on such a busy background that we never *could* figure out the
> name!!
>         The most spectacular quilt was a twin-sized appliqu. There were
vases of
> Penn. Dutch-style tulips in pinks and purples with the very curvy stems,
> leaves and vases done in 2 shades of green. the blocks were set on point
> and separated with green sashing and there were fancy feathers and cables
> quilted all around and every bit of the background was quilted with a 1/2"
> grid of squares set on point. Wow!
>         Last was my favorite. It was a quilt granny made for my Uncle
James and
> the only thing besides his clothes and car that he *rescued* from an
> unhappy first marriage. It was large hexagons (about 3" across?) set
> side-by-side and connected in the corners by little yellow squares on
> point. Almost all the hexagons were stripes, checks or plaids. The whole
> thing was finished with a wide yellow border and the binding was pieced
> together from lots of different red and pink fabrics. Very bright, and
> scrappy with a surprisingly modern graphic look! It looked like something I
> would make myself!! :-))
>         I know this is long, (congrats if you made it to the end), but I knew
> there would be those of you here who would understand how cool this was to
> me and that it was a real bright spot in an otherwise dreary, depressing
> weekend. Then when I stumbled in the door about 7:00 Sunday evening, the
> house was cleaner than when I left, there was a big bouquet of wild flowers
> on the dining room table and a hot supper on the stove. Got to love my
> dearest darlin'. :-)
>         Thanks for letting me ramble.
> --
> Deb
> http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Flats/4237/


 
 
 

The quilty part of my weekend (very long, but on-topic)

Post by Jeff/Michelle Norto » Wed, 16 Sep 1998 04:00:00


The quilts all sound really nice.  I too can understand about finding quilts
you didn't know existed.  There are 2 quilts at my grandpa's that my grandma
did.  I didn't even know they were there.  The name for the one escapes me
right now and I only briefly saw the other one (grandpa pulled it down then
put it right back up?) Grandma was working on one when she died, all hand
pieced from clothes scraps.  Mostly polyester.  Since no one in the family
quilts now except for me, I took it to finish it.  Only have 6 blocks to do.
(As soon as  I work up the emotional courage to finish them).
Sometimes funerals can be blessings in disguise.  Sorry to hear about it.
As a good friend told me several months ago, put a smile on your face and a
good thought about the person in your head, and somehow you'll be able to
smile thru the tears and memories.
Your hubby sounds perfect.  Never let him go.
Michelle in maryland
Quote:
> That got us talking
>about quilting. I'm the only quilter in the family right now, the last was
>my great-grandma McNeil. My grandma opened up the cedar chest and started
>dragging out quilts I didn't know she had and my Aunt Susan brought some
>from her house that I didn't know she had!
> There were 3 baby quilts, one made for my mom and one for each of her
>brothers. These were made in the 1930s and '40s. Uncle Leroy's was pretty
>far gone---lots of shredded patches. It alternated plain pink squares with
>muslin squares embroidered with animals. Mom's was a whole cloth, pink on
>one side and deep blue on the other, with lots of fancy quilting. My fave
>was Uncle James', a scrappy nine-patch done in lots of different pinks and
>blues with a wide pink border (granny must have liked pink!!) and the
>prints were like the Aunt Gracies and Granny's Apron prints, only old.
> There was a really cool friendship quilt made for my great-aunt Maxine,
>(now deceased). It was dated March 5, 1930. It was signed by lots of people
>I know (in my grandma's generation) and lots more I didn't. The signed
>album blocks were set on point and alternated with deep blue squares. It
>was really interesting to see the different fabrics people chose and how
>the names were embroidered. My great-aunt Gertie (her DH was the one who
>died last week) was a twin, and she and her sister put their names together
>in the same block instead of doing separate blocks. One block just said
>Estelle, done in all-caps about 2" tall----a very confident,
>everyone-knows-me sort of block! Then there was one with such small
>lettering on such a busy background that we never *could* figure out the
>name!!
> The most spectacular quilt was a twin-sized appliqu. There were vases of
>Penn. Dutch-style tulips in pinks and purples with the very curvy stems,
>leaves and vases done in 2 shades of green. the blocks were set on point
>and separated with green sashing and there were fancy feathers and cables
>quilted all around and every bit of the background was quilted with a 1/2"
>grid of squares set on point. Wow!
> Last was my favorite. It was a quilt granny made for my Uncle James and
>the only thing besides his clothes and car that he *rescued* from an
>unhappy first marriage. It was large hexagons (about 3" across?) set
>side-by-side and connected in the corners by little yellow squares on
>point. Almost all the hexagons were stripes, checks or plaids. The whole
>thing was finished with a wide yellow border and the binding was pieced
>together from lots of different red and pink fabrics. Very bright, and
>scrappy with a surprisingly modern graphic look! It looked like something I
>would make myself!! :-))
> I know this is long, (congrats if you made it to the end), but I knew
>there would be those of you here who would understand how cool this was to
>me and that it was a real bright spot in an otherwise dreary, depressing
>weekend. Then when I stumbled in the door about 7:00 Sunday evening, the
>house was cleaner than when I left, there was a big bouquet of wild flowers
>on the dining room table and a hot supper on the stove. Got to love my
>dearest darlin'. :-)
> Thanks for letting me ramble.
>--
>Deb
>http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Flats/4237/

 
 
 

The quilty part of my weekend (very long, but on-topic)

Post by aqu.. » Wed, 16 Sep 1998 04:00:00



Quote:
>Hi y'all. Most of you know I spent the weekend attending a family funeral,
>but I wanted to share with you something else that happened. I traveled to
>the funeral with my parents (DH didn't go) and we stayed at my grandma's
>house. I was telling the family about the group and Ruth and shared the
>poem Ellen posted (lots of sniffles and moist eyes!) That got us talking
>about quilting. I'm the only quilter in the family right now, the last was
>my great-grandma McNeil. My grandma opened up the cedar chest and started
>dragging out quilts I didn't know she had and my Aunt Susan brought some
>from her house that I didn't know she had!

Deb,
This is a wonderful story and great descriptions.  Great ending.
Isn't it nice to be missed?
One suggestion I have is for you or someone to catalog these quilts.
Amazing how quickly you forget details.  I always relied on being able
to ask again the person or relationship of pictures or items.  Now
there is no one to ask, my brothers and I have such different memories
of the same incidents or items, we are not sure anymore what is what
or who is who.
In a nutshell, put it in writing or attach some kind of label.
Anna Belle
Palm Bay FL
 
 
 

The quilty part of my weekend (very long, but on-topic)

Post by Deb » Wed, 16 Sep 1998 04:00:00


That's a good idea, Anna Belle. After writing this post, I had the same
thought myself. There were already a few names on the friendship quilt that
didn't mean anything to any of us, even my grandma. Unfortunately, I
probably won't ever own any of these quilts---I already have a GFG made by
granny and there's lots of other family to go around---but I can still
write something down and have thought about asking if they'd be
willing/interested in having me make some kind of labels that could be
attached to the backs. It's this sort of thing that makes me a great
believer in labeling my quilts! :-)
--
Deb
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Flats/4237/
Quote:
Anna Belle wrote....
> Deb,
> This is a wonderful story and great descriptions.  Great ending.
> Isn't it nice to be missed?
> One suggestion I have is for you or someone to catalog these quilts.
> Amazing how quickly you forget details.  I always relied on being able
> to ask again the person or relationship of pictures or items.  Now
> there is no one to ask, my brothers and I have such different memories
> of the same incidents or items, we are not sure anymore what is what
> or who is who.
> In a nutshell, put it in writing or attach some kind of label.
> Anna Belle
> Palm Bay FL

 
 
 

The quilty part of my weekend (very long, but on-topic)

Post by Gay Bosto » Thu, 17 Sep 1998 04:00:00


Thanks for the great story, Deb. I love it when someone finds one of
these treasure troves in their own family!
Gay
Quote:

>... My grandma opened up the cedar chest and started
> dragging out quilts I didn't know she had and my Aunt Susan brought >some from her house that I didn't know she had!

 
 
 

The quilty part of my weekend (very long, but on-topic)

Post by aqu.. » Thu, 17 Sep 1998 04:00:00



Quote:
>That's a good idea, Anna Belle. After writing this post, I had the same
>thought myself. There were already a few names on the friendship quilt that
>didn't mean anything to any of us, even my grandma. Unfortunately, I
>probably won't ever own any of these quilts---I already have a GFG made by
>granny and there's lots of other family to go around---but I can still
>write something down and have thought about asking if they'd be
>willing/interested in having me make some kind of labels that could be
>attached to the backs. It's this sort of thing that makes me a great
>believer in labeling my quilts! :-)
>--
>Deb
>http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Flats/4237/

Deb,
Had one more thought after I posted.  I did a family quilt with lots
of stuff on it.  Pieces of Mother's jewelry, Dad's pipe tools, etc.
Hadn't decided whether I would add to it later or not, so I made a
pocket with a flap, like an envelope, for the back and typed a
description.  Left the paper print out in the pocket and the document
in computer memory, so I can update if needed.
Anna Belle
Palm Bay FL
 
 
 

The quilty part of my weekend (very long, but on-topic)

Post by Rita Denenber » Thu, 17 Sep 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

> Hi y'all. Most of you know I spent the weekend attending a family funeral,
> but I wanted to share with you something else that happened. I traveled to
> the funeral with my parents (DH didn't go) and we stayed at my grandma's
> house. I was telling the family about the group and Ruth and shared the
> poem Ellen posted (lots of sniffles and moist eyes!) That got us talking
> about quilting. I'm the only quilter in the family right now, the last was
> my great-grandma McNeil. My grandma opened up the cedar chest and started
> dragging out quilts I didn't know she had and my Aunt Susan brought some
> from her house that I didn't know she had!
>         There were 3 baby quilts, one made for my mom and one for each of her
> brothers. These were made in the 1930s and '40s. Uncle Leroy's was pretty
> far gone---lots of shredded patches. It alternated plain pink squares with
> muslin squares embroidered with animals. Mom's was a whole cloth, pink on
> one side and deep blue on the other, with lots of fancy quilting. My fave
> was Uncle James', a scrappy nine-patch done in lots of different pinks and
> blues with a wide pink border (granny must have liked pink!!) and the
> prints were like the Aunt Gracies and Granny's Apron prints, only old.
>         There was a really cool friendship quilt made for my great-aunt Maxine,
> (now deceased). It was dated March 5, 1930. It was signed by lots of people
> I know (in my grandma's generation) and lots more I didn't. The signed
> album blocks were set on point and alternated with deep blue squares. It
> was really interesting to see the different fabrics people chose and how
> the names were embroidered. My great-aunt Gertie (her DH was the one who
> died last week) was a twin, and she and her sister put their names together
> in the same block instead of doing separate blocks. One block just said
> Estelle, done in all-caps about 2" tall----a very confident,
> everyone-knows-me sort of block! Then there was one with such small
> lettering on such a busy background that we never *could* figure out the
> name!!
>         The most spectacular quilt was a twin-sized appliqu. There were vases of
> Penn. Dutch-style tulips in pinks and purples with the very curvy stems,
> leaves and vases done in 2 shades of green. the blocks were set on point
> and separated with green sashing and there were fancy feathers and cables
> quilted all around and every bit of the background was quilted with a 1/2"
> grid of squares set on point. Wow!
>         Last was my favorite. It was a quilt granny made for my Uncle James and
> the only thing besides his clothes and car that he *rescued* from an
> unhappy first marriage. It was large hexagons (about 3" across?) set
> side-by-side and connected in the corners by little yellow squares on
> point. Almost all the hexagons were stripes, checks or plaids. The whole
> thing was finished with a wide yellow border and the binding was pieced
> together from lots of different red and pink fabrics. Very bright, and
> scrappy with a surprisingly modern graphic look! It looked like something I
> would make myself!! :-))
>         I know this is long, (congrats if you made it to the end), but I knew
> there would be those of you here who would understand how cool this was to
> me and that it was a real bright spot in an otherwise dreary, depressing
> weekend. Then when I stumbled in the door about 7:00 Sunday evening, the
> house was cleaner than when I left, there was a big bouquet of wild flowers
> on the dining room table and a hot supper on the stove. Got to love my
> dearest darlin'. :-)
>         Thanks for letting me ramble.
> --
> Deb
> http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Flats/4237/

Glad your delicious find made the weekend tolerable. How's about
documenting these quilts so that the info won't get lost for future
generations.
--
Rita who's a firm believer in labeling her quilts.
http://myquilts.hypermart.net
 
 
 

The quilty part of my weekend (very long, but on-topic)

Post by Mariss » Thu, 17 Sep 1998 04:00:00


Deb I am glad you got a nice memory out of an otherwise sad experience!

Quote:

>         I know this is long, (congrats if you made it to the end), but I knew
> there would be those of you here who would understand how cool this was to
> me and that it was a real bright spot in an otherwise dreary, depressing
> weekend.

********************************************************
Marissa Vignali
URL: http://www.bmb.psu.edu/597a/stdnts96/Vignali      
To reply, remove the obvious from the reply to address
********************************************************