Newbie needs help

Newbie needs help

Post by Maria » Fri, 23 Mar 2001 14:01:31



Hi,

I am one of those ambitious types of people who starts very difficult
projects and sometimes finishes them.

Background:
  At the same time I discovered their existence two local thrift stores
w/o changing rooms had sales.  One had a $0.50 an item sale, one had a
$3.00 a grocery bag full sale.  Being a thrifty sort of person, I
grabbed everything silk, everything linen, two wool coats with fur
collars, and some nice velvet things <g>.  Most of it :( didn't fit me,
but enough did that my collection of silk shirts that fit me is now over
25! for $0.50 more per piece than I paid, I sold a bunch of it to
friends but I still had a lot of intriguing pattern and solid colored
silks and nothing to do with them.

  A few months ago I started (and never really got any farther) a
patchwork thing made out of one pair silk pants, two silk shirts that
had seams which were determined to stop being seams, and all of the silk
shoulderpads out of shirts since I loathe shoulderpads.  I was thinking
of making it all into one big piece of fabric and then making a skirt or
pants.  The pattern, if there was a pattern, was something like a crazy
quilt.  Along about the 10th or 11th piece sewed on, I had an epiphany
of "I know how to sew, how can I be so stupid" that just sewing edges
together does not make for a flat piece of fabric.  I fussed with it for
a bit and was making plans on what to do with it when it occured to me
to make an actual geometric pattern.

Now:

  I figure since this is my first quilt, even if it is silk (it is silk
that I paid less per yard for than new cotton calicos) I would like to
try doing a sampler type thing--one block each of not-too-difficult
patterns that use triangles and squares and not applique (which I
already know how to do but hate with a passion).

  The only book on quilting at the local bookstore that had patterns was
called "Baby Quilts" by Linda Denner.  It seems to be a fairly
straightforward book, but having no previous quilting experience I can't
be sure.  Can anyone comment?
  The school library had the "Illustrated Index to Traditional American
Quilt Patterns" which has all sorts of patterns I think I neat.

  Before I start sewing I would like to make a mock up on the computer
or on graph paper or something just so I have a better idea of how
things work.  I plan to sew one block at a time but still would like to
see what a whole bunch of different blocks would look like on one quilt
top and whether I should just pick one pattern (bear in mind that I do
not have very much of any given color, and what I do have is in odd
shapes) and do that.  I am having a devil of a time getting any of the
drawing programs on campus to do anything resembling blocks and shapes
and I don't want to drop a bundle on software I might not use again.
Does anyone have any suggestions on how I can make a mock up?  What is
the best way to transfer a pattern to graph paper?

Thank you,
-M

 
 
 

Newbie needs help

Post by Susan For » Sat, 24 Mar 2001 13:02:03


Draw some 3 x 3 squares on graph paper and some 4 x 4
squares. These are the basis of many traditonal piece
patterns. Then play with triangles, bisecting some of
the squares, dividing the squares in half and in
fourths in an "X". Those are half-square triangles and
quarter square triangles. Then take some colored
pencils and color them in to see what designs and
colorations you like. It might take a lot of sketching.

The grid usually represents increments in inches. I
ususally use 1 square per inch on a graph paper.

Susan

Quote:

> Hi,

> I am one of those ambitious types of people who starts very difficult
> projects and sometimes finishes them.

> Background:
>   At the same time I discovered their existence two local thrift stores
> w/o changing rooms had sales.  One had a $0.50 an item sale, one had a
> $3.00 a grocery bag full sale.  Being a thrifty sort of person, I
> grabbed everything silk, everything linen, two wool coats with fur
> collars, and some nice velvet things <g>.  Most of it :( didn't fit me,
> but enough did that my collection of silk shirts that fit me is now over
> 25! for $0.50 more per piece than I paid, I sold a bunch of it to
> friends but I still had a lot of intriguing pattern and solid colored
> silks and nothing to do with them.

>   A few months ago I started (and never really got any farther) a
> patchwork thing made out of one pair silk pants, two silk shirts that
> had seams which were determined to stop being seams, and all of the silk
> shoulderpads out of shirts since I loathe shoulderpads.  I was thinking
> of making it all into one big piece of fabric and then making a skirt or
> pants.  The pattern, if there was a pattern, was something like a crazy
> quilt.  Along about the 10th or 11th piece sewed on, I had an epiphany
> of "I know how to sew, how can I be so stupid" that just sewing edges
> together does not make for a flat piece of fabric.  I fussed with it for
> a bit and was making plans on what to do with it when it occured to me
> to make an actual geometric pattern.

> Now:

>   I figure since this is my first quilt, even if it is silk (it is silk
> that I paid less per yard for than new cotton calicos) I would like to
> try doing a sampler type thing--one block each of not-too-difficult
> patterns that use triangles and squares and not applique (which I
> already know how to do but hate with a passion).

>   The only book on quilting at the local bookstore that had patterns was
> called "Baby Quilts" by Linda Denner.  It seems to be a fairly
> straightforward book, but having no previous quilting experience I can't
> be sure.  Can anyone comment?
>   The school library had the "Illustrated Index to Traditional American
> Quilt Patterns" which has all sorts of patterns I think I neat.

>   Before I start sewing I would like to make a mock up on the computer
> or on graph paper or something just so I have a better idea of how
> things work.  I plan to sew one block at a time but still would like to
> see what a whole bunch of different blocks would look like on one quilt
> top and whether I should just pick one pattern (bear in mind that I do
> not have very much of any given color, and what I do have is in odd
> shapes) and do that.  I am having a devil of a time getting any of the
> drawing programs on campus to do anything resembling blocks and shapes
> and I don't want to drop a bundle on software I might not use again.
> Does anyone have any suggestions on how I can make a mock up?  What is
> the best way to transfer a pattern to graph paper?

> Thank you,
> -M