Free motion tension problems--help!

Free motion tension problems--help!

Post by Polly Esthe » Wed, 05 Aug 2009 23:22:31



I think we've come full circle on this one.  Back at the beginning, I
reminded Michelle to be sure that her presser foot was DOWN.  It won't look
like it is but it matters.  Lots.
    Now that we have introduced the darning foot - there are several types
and one will probably make you happier than another.  For me, the best one
is shaped like a horseshoe with the open end facing me.  There's also a full
circle one, a clear plastic sort of oval and a large purple one named Big
Foot, I think.  I killed 3 big feet before I discovered the horseshoe.  I
just might be a little heavy-handed when I'm quilting.  Polly

"DiMa" <wrote> Thanks Patti,

Quote:

> Thursday will be a practice day for me - and I am looking forward to not
> having to struggle as I did with the walking foot.
> Will let you know how it went.
> Thanks heaps.
> "Patti" <wrote>> I'm glad you popped back in Di.  I thought of something
> else last night:
>> when you do start using your darning foot, you might be alarmed that it
>> doesn't seem to hold the fabric - it doesn't go down far enough when you
>> put the presser foot lever down to its lowest position.  That is
>> perfectly normal.  It only holds the fabric down as it is making the
>> stitch (I think that's the way round!).  It is that that makes the
>> movement possible.
>> You need to anchor the fabric by putting the needle down into the exact
>> place you want to start.  Then, when you put your foot on the foot
>> control to start, nothing will move until *you move the fabric.  Hold the
>> quilt still until you are ready to go.   It is a completely different way
>> of working.
>> You'll soon get the hang of it, but I thought I might just mention to you
>> the things that made me think the machine was broken! when I first
>> started.

 
 
 

Free motion tension problems--help!

Post by DiMa » Thu, 06 Aug 2009 09:24:46


Polly, my darning foot is a "U" shaped one - haven't used it yet but will
tomorrow when practicing. Fingers crossed I get it right.

--
Di
I'm creative!  You can't expect me to be neat too.
Vic Australia
To reply please remove # in email address.

Quote:
>I think we've come full circle on this one.  Back at the beginning, I
>reminded Michelle to be sure that her presser foot was DOWN.  It won't look
>like it is but it matters.  Lots.
>    Now that we have introduced the darning foot - there are several types
> and one will probably make you happier than another.  For me, the best one
> is shaped like a horseshoe with the open end facing me.  There's also a
> full circle one, a clear plastic sort of oval and a large purple one named
> Big Foot, I think.  I killed 3 big feet before I discovered the horseshoe.
> I just might be a little heavy-handed when I'm quilting.  Polly

> "DiMa" <wrote> Thanks Patti,

>> Thursday will be a practice day for me - and I am looking forward to not
>> having to struggle as I did with the walking foot.
>> Will let you know how it went.
>> Thanks heaps.

>> "Patti" <wrote>> I'm glad you popped back in Di.  I thought of something
>> else last night:
>>> when you do start using your darning foot, you might be alarmed that it
>>> doesn't seem to hold the fabric - it doesn't go down far enough when you
>>> put the presser foot lever down to its lowest position.  That is
>>> perfectly normal.  It only holds the fabric down as it is making the
>>> stitch (I think that's the way round!).  It is that that makes the
>>> movement possible.
>>> You need to anchor the fabric by putting the needle down into the exact
>>> place you want to start.  Then, when you put your foot on the foot
>>> control to start, nothing will move until *you move the fabric.  Hold
>>> the quilt still until you are ready to go.   It is a completely
>>> different way of working.
>>> You'll soon get the hang of it, but I thought I might just mention to
>>> you the things that made me think the machine was broken! when I first
>>> started.


 
 
 

Free motion tension problems--help!

Post by Tari » Thu, 06 Aug 2009 10:13:05


Just an additional thought. I haven't read all the replies so
my apologies if I am repeating.  I was FMQ'ing today and
was trying out my various gloves I have gathered to use for that.  My
favorite seem to be a pair of knit garden gloves with ***y bumps on them.
They are great but
I can tell you it is really hard to FMQ for me with no gloves for the extra
grip.  The fabric seems to move a lot
smoother for me.
Taria

Quote:
> Took my long awaited (I've been gathering my courage) into free motion
> yesterday.  While I didn't notice any tension problems on the block I've
> been practicing on, I'm having problems with the quilt.  It looks okay on
> the front, but on the back it's as if the top thread is too loose (looping
> underneath) and the bottom too tight--despite my adjusting the tension on
> the top thread.  It manifests itself on curves.  (I'm stippling.)  Any
> ideas?

> TIA
> Michelle in Nevada, USA

 
 
 

Free motion tension problems--help!

Post by Patt » Thu, 06 Aug 2009 15:41:39


Sorry to 'add-on' yet again - things other folk say remind me.  Please
bear with me!
I felt my quilt wasn't moving well for me one day, paid attention to
what I was doing to see why.  I discovered that I was pressing on the
quilt so hard with my hands (for control purposes?) that it was anchored
to the machine 'table'.  So, try not to get as tense as I do >gg<
.


Quote:
>Just an additional thought. I haven't read all the replies so
>my apologies if I am repeating.  I was FMQ'ing today and
>was trying out my various gloves I have gathered to use for that.  My
>favorite seem to be a pair of knit garden gloves with ***y bumps on them.
>They are great but
>I can tell you it is really hard to FMQ for me with no gloves for the extra
>grip.  The fabric seems to move a lot
>smoother for me.
>Taria

--
Best Regards
pat on the hill
 
 
 

Free motion tension problems--help!

Post by Sand » Thu, 06 Aug 2009 23:40:08



Quote:

> Polly, my darning foot is a "U" shaped one - haven't used it yet but will
> tomorrow when practicing. Fingers crossed I get it right.

> --
> Di
> I'm creative!  You can't expect me to be neat too.
> Vic Australia
> To reply please remove # in email address.

Like Polly, I also prefer the U-shaped darning foot. It's still round
"enough" that I can use it to gauge rough distances between rows of
stitches, yet the open area allows much better visibility. Best of luck!
:)

Quote:


> >I think we've come full circle on this one.  Back at the beginning, I
> >reminded Michelle to be sure that her presser foot was DOWN.  It won't look
> >like it is but it matters.  Lots.
> >    Now that we have introduced the darning foot - there are several types
> > and one will probably make you happier than another.  For me, the best one
> > is shaped like a horseshoe with the open end facing me.  There's also a
> > full circle one, a clear plastic sort of oval and a large purple one named
> > Big Foot, I think.  I killed 3 big feet before I discovered the horseshoe.
> > I just might be a little heavy-handed when I'm quilting.  Polly

> > "DiMa" <wrote> Thanks Patti,

> >> Thursday will be a practice day for me - and I am looking forward to not
> >> having to struggle as I did with the walking foot.
> >> Will let you know how it went.
> >> Thanks heaps.

> >> "Patti" <wrote>> I'm glad you popped back in Di.  I thought of something
> >> else last night:
> >>> when you do start using your darning foot, you might be alarmed that it
> >>> doesn't seem to hold the fabric - it doesn't go down far enough when you
> >>> put the presser foot lever down to its lowest position.  That is
> >>> perfectly normal.  It only holds the fabric down as it is making the
> >>> stitch (I think that's the way round!).  It is that that makes the
> >>> movement possible.
> >>> You need to anchor the fabric by putting the needle down into the exact
> >>> place you want to start.  Then, when you put your foot on the foot
> >>> control to start, nothing will move until *you move the fabric.  Hold
> >>> the quilt still until you are ready to go.   It is a completely
> >>> different way of working.
> >>> You'll soon get the hang of it, but I thought I might just mention to
> >>> you the things that made me think the machine was broken! when I first
> >>> started.

--
Sandy in Henderson, near Las Vegas
sw.foster1 (at) gmail (dot) com (remove/change the obvious)
http://www.sandymike.net
 
 
 

Free motion tension problems--help!

Post by Michelle C » Fri, 07 Aug 2009 03:29:52


Hi Taria,

Yes, I'm thinking gloves might help too.  It is hard to get a good grip!

Thanks!
Michelle in Nevada, USA

Quote:

> Just an additional thought. I haven't read all the replies so
> my apologies if I am repeating.  I was FMQ'ing today and
> was trying out my various gloves I have gathered to use for that.  My
> favorite seem to be a pair of knit garden gloves with ***y bumps on them.
> They are great but
> I can tell you it is really hard to FMQ for me with no gloves for the extra
> grip.  The fabric seems to move a lot
> smoother for me.
> Taria


>> Took my long awaited (I've been gathering my courage) into free motion
>> yesterday.  While I didn't notice any tension problems on the block I've
>> been practicing on, I'm having problems with the quilt.  It looks okay on
>> the front, but on the back it's as if the top thread is too loose (looping
>> underneath) and the bottom too tight--despite my adjusting the tension on
>> the top thread.  It manifests itself on curves.  (I'm stippling.)  Any
>> ideas?

>> TIA
>> Michelle in Nevada, USA

 
 
 

Free motion tension problems--help!

Post by Michelle C » Fri, 07 Aug 2009 03:30:54


LOL!  Sounds like great advice, Patti.  Maybe I'll be able to do that in
a few hundred hours from now.  ;-)

Still, I do get your point.

Best regards,
Michelle in Nevada, USA

Quote:

> Sorry to 'add-on' yet again - things other folk say remind me.  Please
> bear with me!
> I felt my quilt wasn't moving well for me one day, paid attention to
> what I was doing to see why.  I discovered that I was pressing on the
> quilt so hard with my hands (for control purposes?) that it was anchored
> to the machine 'table'.  So, try not to get as tense as I do >gg<
> .


>> Just an additional thought. I haven't read all the replies so
>> my apologies if I am repeating.  I was FMQ'ing today and
>> was trying out my various gloves I have gathered to use for that.  My
>> favorite seem to be a pair of knit garden gloves with ***y bumps on
>> them.
>> They are great but
>> I can tell you it is really hard to FMQ for me with no gloves for the
>> extra
>> grip.  The fabric seems to move a lot
>> smoother for me.
>> Taria

 
 
 

Free motion tension problems--help!

Post by Pat in Virgini » Fri, 07 Aug 2009 09:35:02


Well, I just read the header as meaning 'motion tension problems help at no
cost.'
Guess it is time to close up this computer for today.
PAT, LOL in VA


Quote:
> Took my long awaited (I've been gathering my courage) into free motion
> yesterday.  While I didn't notice any tension problems on the block I've
> been practicing on, I'm having problems with the quilt.  It looks okay on
> the front, but on the back it's as if the top thread is too loose (looping
> underneath) and the bottom too tight--despite my adjusting the tension on
> the top thread.  It manifests itself on curves.  (I'm stippling.)  Any
> ideas?

> TIA
> Michelle in Nevada, USA

 
 
 

Free motion tension problems--help!

Post by Michelle C » Fri, 07 Aug 2009 10:04:43


LOL!  :-)

Michelle in Nevada, USA

Quote:

> Well, I just read the header as meaning 'motion tension problems help at no
> cost.'
> Guess it is time to close up this computer for today.
> PAT, LOL in VA



>> Took my long awaited (I've been gathering my courage) into free motion
>> yesterday.  While I didn't notice any tension problems on the block I've
>> been practicing on, I'm having problems with the quilt.  It looks okay on
>> the front, but on the back it's as if the top thread is too loose (looping
>> underneath) and the bottom too tight--despite my adjusting the tension on
>> the top thread.  It manifests itself on curves.  (I'm stippling.)  Any
>> ideas?

>> TIA
>> Michelle in Nevada, USA