Q re spray basting

Q re spray basting

Post by Edna Pear » Sat, 22 Aug 2009 06:08:53



I went to a couple of fabric stores today and, yes, I got a little carried
away with buying cloth.  I also saw some of the spray "basting" material,
for which the stores want $10 to11 dollars for a spray can about nine inches
tall -- you know what I mean, about the size of a can of spray paint.

I thought that was a bit rich, but then I wondered how many double-bed sized
quilts you could baste such with such a can.  Any thoughts?

Thanks in advance,
Edna Pearl

 
 
 

Q re spray basting

Post by Joann » Sat, 22 Aug 2009 07:29:15


A lot is the answer. The last can I replaced last me just over two
years. I know that's  not really saying anything it depends on how many
quilts. I never kept track and I do a lot of wall*** or baby quilts
and it was a lot. I think it's worth it, but that's my two cents. I also
use the Elmer spray glue. Found it in the hardware section for cheaper
and have not had any problems other then use when you can open all the
windows. No issues with it washing out or gumming up my needle. Just my
two cents.
Joanna
Quote:

> I went to a couple of fabric stores today and, yes, I got a little carried
> away with buying cloth.  I also saw some of the spray "basting" material,
> for which the stores want $10 to11 dollars for a spray can about nine inches
> tall -- you know what I mean, about the size of a can of spray paint.

> I thought that was a bit rich, but then I wondered how many double-bed sized
> quilts you could baste such with such a can.  Any thoughts?

> Thanks in advance,
> Edna Pearl


 
 
 

Q re spray basting

Post by Julia in M » Sat, 22 Aug 2009 10:29:25


The can I have says it's supposed to do 3 queen sized quilts. I've never
kept track. I usually try to buy it at Hobby Lobby or JoAnn Fabrics when
I've got a 40% off coupon. I do try to use it outside. It's flammable
and smells a lot.

Julia in MN

Quote:

> I went to a couple of fabric stores today and, yes, I got a little carried
> away with buying cloth.  I also saw some of the spray "basting" material,
> for which the stores want $10 to11 dollars for a spray can about nine inches
> tall -- you know what I mean, about the size of a can of spray paint.

> I thought that was a bit rich, but then I wondered how many double-bed sized
> quilts you could baste such with such a can.  Any thoughts?

> Thanks in advance,
> Edna Pearl

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Q re spray basting

Post by Polly Esthe » Sat, 22 Aug 2009 10:42:03


It promises not to gum up SM needles but it did.  Could have something to do
with our 99% humidity - more or less. We almost had to have a pity party for
me the time I tried that stuff.  Polly

"Julia in MN" <wrote> The can I have says it's supposed to do 3 queen sized
quilts. I've never

Quote:
> kept track. I usually try to buy it at Hobby Lobby or JoAnn Fabrics when
> I've got a 40% off coupon. I do try to use it outside. It's flammable and
> smells a lot.


>> I went to a couple of fabric stores today and, yes, I got a little
>> carried away with buying cloth.  I also saw some of the spray "basting"
>> material, for which the stores want $10 to11 dollars for a spray can
>> about nine inches tall -- you know what I mean, about the size of a can
>> of spray paint.

>> I thought that was a bit rich, but then I wondered how many double-bed
>> sized quilts you could baste such with such a can.  Any thoughts?

 
 
 

Q re spray basting

Post by onetexsu » Sat, 22 Aug 2009 14:48:40


I buy the kind that WalMart carries. It's a bit cheaper. And the trick
to keep from gumming needles is to spray evenly and once everything is
together give it overnight to dry before trying to sew. At least it
works for me. I really love the stuff. Not how it smells, or the price
of buying. But I love that it lets me baste a quilt firmly and
securely by myself. If I had to pin a quilt I just would never get
anything quilted. Too much for my arthritic fingers and wrists.

Sunny

 
 
 

Q re spray basting

Post by Patt » Sat, 22 Aug 2009 16:00:53


That's handy to know.  Thanks Sunny.  I now have my first can; and, come
October, with a bit of luck, I'll be re-making a coverlet - by putting
batting in and quilting properly.  It will be a good one to experiment
on I think.  I got the 505, as I think that is the one I have heard
mentioned here.
.
In message


Quote:
>I buy the kind that WalMart carries. It's a bit cheaper. And the trick
>to keep from gumming needles is to spray evenly and once everything is
>together give it overnight to dry before trying to sew. At least it
>works for me. I really love the stuff. Not how it smells, or the price
>of buying. But I love that it lets me baste a quilt firmly and
>securely by myself. If I had to pin a quilt I just would never get
>anything quilted. Too much for my arthritic fingers and wrists.

>Sunny

--
Best Regards
pat on the hill
 
 
 

Q re spray basting

Post by Sherry Star » Sat, 22 Aug 2009 23:59:06




Quote:
> I went to a couple of fabric stores today and, yes, I got a little carried
> away with buying cloth. ?I also saw some of the spray "basting" material,
> for which the stores want $10 to11 dollars for a spray can about nine inches
> tall -- you know what I mean, about the size of a can of spray paint.

> I thought that was a bit rich, but then I wondered how many double-bed sized
> quilts you could baste such with such a can. ?Any thoughts?

> Thanks in advance,
> Edna Pearl

I have had a can for over 2 years, and it has made several twin size
or slightly larger, and lots of wall***s and miniature quilts.  I
just threw away the can.
Sherry Starr
 
 
 

Q re spray basting

Post by Trixi » Sun, 23 Aug 2009 10:01:24


Has anybody tried the Sulky KK2000 Temporary Spray Adhesive? It is supposed
to "temporarily bonds fabrics to appliqu s, batting, stabilizers, and even
to patterns and templates." and has these specs:

    * You can reposition the fabric before stitching it in place; it works
great with landscape quilting projects
    * Bonding disappears in 2-5 days
    * The handy size can gives you as much coverage as the bigger cans-made
of a highly concentrated material combined with a low pressure spray for a
more precise spray pattern and less waste.
    * Nontoxic, odorless, ozone-friendly, nonflammable, will not stain

I've seen this advertised in a bunch of quilting-related magazines and
catalogs and wondered if it truly was odorless, etc., as I am so sensitive
to any type of scent or fragrance. It would be nice to have a better
alternative.

Trixie


Quote:
> I went to a couple of fabric stores today and, yes, I got a little carried
> away with buying cloth.  I also saw some of the spray "basting" material,
> for which the stores want $10 to11 dollars for a spray can about nine
> inches tall -- you know what I mean, about the size of a can of spray
> paint.

> I thought that was a bit rich, but then I wondered how many double-bed
> sized quilts you could baste such with such a can.  Any thoughts?

> Thanks in advance,
> Edna Pearl

 
 
 

Q re spray basting

Post by Julia in M » Sun, 23 Aug 2009 10:40:31


I think that's the Sulky spray that I've used. If so, it is not
odorless, though the odor is not as strong as the June Tailor brand. The
can is a lot smaller and I don't think it goes as far as the larger
cans, but maybe I spray too heavily. It is not as readily available
around here as the June Tailor spray. Because it is nonflammable and the
odor isn't as bad, I have used it indoors, on my kitchen floor with the
vent fan on and a window open a bit.

Julia in MN

Quote:

> Has anybody tried the Sulky KK2000 Temporary Spray Adhesive? It is supposed
> to "temporarily bonds fabrics to appliqu s, batting, stabilizers, and even
> to patterns and templates." and has these specs:

>     * You can reposition the fabric before stitching it in place; it works
> great with landscape quilting projects
>     * Bonding disappears in 2-5 days
>     * The handy size can gives you as much coverage as the bigger cans-made
> of a highly concentrated material combined with a low pressure spray for a
> more precise spray pattern and less waste.
>     * Nontoxic, odorless, ozone-friendly, nonflammable, will not stain

> I've seen this advertised in a bunch of quilting-related magazines and
> catalogs and wondered if it truly was odorless, etc., as I am so sensitive
> to any type of scent or fragrance. It would be nice to have a better
> alternative.

> Trixie



>> I went to a couple of fabric stores today and, yes, I got a little carried
>> away with buying cloth.  I also saw some of the spray "basting" material,
>> for which the stores want $10 to11 dollars for a spray can about nine
>> inches tall -- you know what I mean, about the size of a can of spray
>> paint.

>> I thought that was a bit rich, but then I wondered how many double-bed
>> sized quilts you could baste such with such a can.  Any thoughts?

>> Thanks in advance,
>> Edna Pearl

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Q re spray basting

Post by Trixi » Sun, 23 Aug 2009 11:09:41


It has a green lid and is touted as "Go Green" and "Safe for you, safe for
the planet" so I had high hopes it was truly a product I could use, but it
sounds like I better keep waiting.

Trixie



Quote:
> I think that's the Sulky spray that I've used. If so, it is not odorless,
> though the odor is not as strong as the June Tailor brand. The can is a
> lot smaller and I don't think it goes as far as the larger cans, but maybe
> I spray too heavily. It is not as readily available around here as the
> June Tailor spray. Because it is nonflammable and the odor isn't as bad, I
> have used it indoors, on my kitchen floor with the vent fan on and a
> window open a bit.

> Julia in MN


>> Has anybody tried the Sulky KK2000 Temporary Spray Adhesive? It is
>> supposed to "temporarily bonds fabrics to appliqu s, batting,
>> stabilizers, and even to patterns and templates." and has these specs:

>>     * You can reposition the fabric before stitching it in place; it
>> works great with landscape quilting projects
>>     * Bonding disappears in 2-5 days
>>     * The handy size can gives you as much coverage as the bigger
>> cans-made of a highly concentrated material combined with a low pressure
>> spray for a more precise spray pattern and less waste.
>>     * Nontoxic, odorless, ozone-friendly, nonflammable, will not stain

>> I've seen this advertised in a bunch of quilting-related magazines and
>> catalogs and wondered if it truly was odorless, etc., as I am so
>> sensitive to any type of scent or fragrance. It would be nice to have a
>> better alternative.

>> Trixie



>>> I went to a couple of fabric stores today and, yes, I got a little
>>> carried away with buying cloth.  I also saw some of the spray "basting"
>>> material, for which the stores want $10 to11 dollars for a spray can
>>> about nine inches tall -- you know what I mean, about the size of a can
>>> of spray paint.

>>> I thought that was a bit rich, but then I wondered how many double-bed
>>> sized quilts you could baste such with such a can.  Any thoughts?

>>> Thanks in advance,
>>> Edna Pearl

> --
> -----------
> This message has been scanned for viruses by Norton Anti-Virus
> <http://webpages.charter.net/jaccola/default>
> -----------

 
 
 

Q re spray basting

Post by teleflor » Mon, 24 Aug 2009 03:38:21


Joanna, I've used the Elmer's on paper (I spray the paper and stick it to
the back of the fabric if I have to trace an embroidery pattern or an
appliqu layout on my fabric) and I have always had to throw the can away
before half of it is used up because the nozzle clogs! <whew!>

That has never happened to me with 505, but it has happened with anything
cheaper that I try to buy.

What are your experiences with the nozzle?

Cindy


Quote:
>A lot is the answer. The last can I replaced last me just over two years. I
>know that's  not really saying anything it depends on how many quilts. I
>never kept track and I do a lot of wall*** or baby quilts and it was a
>lot. I think it's worth it, but that's my two cents. I also use the Elmer
>spray glue. Found it in the hardware section for cheaper and have not had
>any problems other then use when you can open all the windows. No issues
>with it washing out or gumming up my needle. Just my two cents.
> Joanna


>> I went to a couple of fabric stores today and, yes, I got a little
>> carried away with buying cloth.  I also saw some of the spray "basting"
>> material, for which the stores want $10 to11 dollars for a spray can
>> about nine inches tall -- you know what I mean, about the size of a can
>> of spray paint.

>> I thought that was a bit rich, but then I wondered how many double-bed
>> sized quilts you could baste such with such a can.  Any thoughts?

>> Thanks in advance,
>> Edna Pearl

 
 
 

Q re spray basting

Post by teleflor » Mon, 24 Aug 2009 03:40:22


I've used it. It seems to work the same for me as the 505.  The can is so
much smaller that I can't wrap my pea brain around the fact that it might
last as long as the bigger cans.

Cindy


Quote:
> Has anybody tried the Sulky KK2000 Temporary Spray Adhesive? It is
> supposed to "temporarily bonds fabrics to appliqu s, batting, stabilizers,
> and even to patterns and templates." and has these specs:

>    * You can reposition the fabric before stitching it in place; it works
> great with landscape quilting projects
>    * Bonding disappears in 2-5 days
>    * The handy size can gives you as much coverage as the bigger cans-made
> of a highly concentrated material combined with a low pressure spray for a
> more precise spray pattern and less waste.
>    * Nontoxic, odorless, ozone-friendly, nonflammable, will not stain

> I've seen this advertised in a bunch of quilting-related magazines and
> catalogs and wondered if it truly was odorless, etc., as I am so sensitive
> to any type of scent or fragrance. It would be nice to have a better
> alternative.

> Trixie



>> I went to a couple of fabric stores today and, yes, I got a little
>> carried away with buying cloth.  I also saw some of the spray "basting"
>> material, for which the stores want $10 to11 dollars for a spray can
>> about nine inches tall -- you know what I mean, about the size of a can
>> of spray paint.

>> I thought that was a bit rich, but then I wondered how many double-bed
>> sized quilts you could baste such with such a can.  Any thoughts?

>> Thanks in advance,
>> Edna Pearl

 
 
 

Q re spray basting

Post by Joann » Mon, 24 Aug 2009 04:41:53


I was always taught anything that is a spray can, such as this glue or
spray paint to tip it upside down when your down and spray for just a
couple of seconds. Never had a problem since I do that. But if it does
clog I would try dipping a paper towel in some paint thinner and just
rub the nozzle a little to get the goop off. Hope this helps.
Joanna
Quote:

> Joanna, I've used the Elmer's on paper (I spray the paper and stick it to
> the back of the fabric if I have to trace an embroidery pattern or an
> appliqu layout on my fabric) and I have always had to throw the can away
> before half of it is used up because the nozzle clogs! <whew!>

> That has never happened to me with 505, but it has happened with anything
> cheaper that I try to buy.

> What are your experiences with the nozzle?

> Cindy