Edge to edge quilting

Edge to edge quilting

Post by Dragonfl » Sat, 30 Jun 2001 05:57:09



She's pulling it all to the back, so the stitching line is at the edge (like
it would be on a "birthed" quilt).  None of the "facing" shows on the front,
unlike a binding where half of it shows on the front.
--
Dragonfly
dragonfly_quilts at hotmail.com



Quote:
> Hi Pat.  Don't mean to be argumentative...but isn't what you are
> describing the same as binding?? Just curious.

> Are you thinking that "binding" only applies to contrasting fabrics?

> Cheers,

> Lynne in Toronto

> ............................................



> > >I don't know Pat but I be interested to find out and can you explain
how
> > >you are finishing a quilt by facing?

> > >Thanks

> > Hi B (if I know you well enough to address you like that now? )
> > Just like putting a facing on the open front of a dress/shirt etc -
> > the quilt top is finished and then quilted in the usual way.
> > Then, instead of a binding, strips of (I use) the backing fabric are
> > sewn onto the edges of the front (right sides together).  If it is a
> > rectangular quilt, I then mitre the corners - sewing up to within a
> > quarter of an inch of the raw edge - and turn the facing to the back.
> > Turn under the raw quarter of an inch and sew in place.  If you are
> > careful with the turning, there is no backing fabric seen on the front
> > and no front fabric seen on the back, the joining seam is halfway down
> > the thickness of the quilt.  It is really no more difficult than binding
> > and, with my pictorial quilts, it lets me finish off the picture at the
> > edge of the picture rather than introducing a solid strip of another
> > colour/shape around it.  Sometimes, of course, I want to frame the
> > picture, but not always.
> > The procedure with fancy-shaped quilts is different and you may not want
> > to be bogged down with that method; but, if you do, then I will gladly
> > describe that too - it isn't hard, just different.
> > Best Regards
> > Pat

 
 
 

Edge to edge quilting

Post by Bernadette Noujaim Baldwi » Sat, 30 Jun 2001 16:15:42


Ermmmmm that'll be Corp***Bang !!!!!

B - did you take the bloomers off or just let em look at them in situ???

Quote:

> Well Mz Suzie, if I recall, it was you and Mr Bang that got all the
> trouble started by tellng the airport security that I had a bomb in my
> bloomers and they wouldn't let me into the country until I "showed them"
> and then I got into trouble for that!!
> So don't be so snooty  missy!   Red Queen


 
 
 

Edge to edge quilting

Post by Bernadette Noujaim Baldwi » Sat, 30 Jun 2001 17:54:42


Pat, let us know what you find out about the rules, personally I think
this kind of binding should be allowed.

B

Quote:



> >So to the uninitiated who just quickly looked, it would just look like you'd
> >turned the binding to the back at the seamline, when it's really a facing?

> >Hmmmm....you might want to ask someone involved with the show and/or judging
> >before you enter your quilts.  Sounds like a good method for picture quilts,
> >but it might not be what they are looking for and it would be a shame to be
> >judged down just because you are doing something different from what they
> >are interested in seeing.
> >--
> Hi Dragonfly
> Yes that's it exactly.  Thanks for the idea of asking at a show.  At the
> moment I am trying to get a better idea of the judging at the show I
> usually enter, following on from all the discussion we had on the NG
> earlier in the year.  I will be doing another picture 'one' for next
> year's Malvern, so it might be relevant.  I'm also hoping to do a fun
> miniature (whether I'll still think it's fun afterwards we have yet to
> find out!!) for the show; but that's all for public examination!!!!
> (excluding RCTQ'ers of course)
> Kind Regards
> Pat Storey

 
 
 

Edge to edge quilting

Post by Bernadette Noujaim Baldwi » Sat, 30 Jun 2001 17:56:42


Of course you know me well enough :)  Which do you prefer Patti or Pat?

I get what you mean by the explanation and can see where it would be
appropriate, in fact it might be something I'll try with my Klimt
quilts.  I think though it will take careful measurements though, unless
I allowed the back of the edging to come over the backing as per
standard binding.

B

Quote:



> >I don't know Pat but I be interested to find out and can you explain how
> >you are finishing a quilt by facing?

> >Thanks

> Hi B (if I know you well enough to address you like that now? )
> Just like putting a facing on the open front of a dress/shirt etc -
> the quilt top is finished and then quilted in the usual way.
> Then, instead of a binding, strips of (I use) the backing fabric are
> sewn onto the edges of the front (right sides together).  If it is a
> rectangular quilt, I then mitre the corners - sewing up to within a
> quarter of an inch of the raw edge - and turn the facing to the back.
> Turn under the raw quarter of an inch and sew in place.  If you are
> careful with the turning, there is no backing fabric seen on the front
> and no front fabric seen on the back, the joining seam is halfway down
> the thickness of the quilt.  It is really no more difficult than binding
> and, with my pictorial quilts, it lets me finish off the picture at the
> edge of the picture rather than introducing a solid strip of another
> colour/shape around it.  Sometimes, of course, I want to frame the
> picture, but not always.
> The procedure with fancy-shaped quilts is different and you may not want
> to be bogged down with that method; but, if you do, then I will gladly
> describe that too - it isn't hard, just different.
> Best Regards
> Pat

 
 
 

Edge to edge quilting

Post by Kathy Appleba » Sat, 30 Jun 2001 23:05:42


Quote:

> Over the past few months, I have seen references here and there to 'edge
> to edge quilting'; and one or two mentioned that this was 'not allowed'
> in a particular show.

snip

Quote:
> I have a
> feeling it might have something to do with a quilt not having a binding?
> If so, I do need to know, because I have started finishing some of my
> quilts by using a facing.

"Edge-to-edge" is what we longarmers call "pantograph". It's a quilt
design that goes in rows (sometimes interlocking, sometimes not), and
has no relation to the actual piecing.

Some people also include an all-over freehand pattern in the
"edge-to-edge" category, some don't.

Not sure why it wouldn't be allowed in a show, unless a) the show
organizer just didn't like the style, and was flexing her power, or b)
the show organizer thinks that's all longarmers can do, and figured that
would be a good way to "keep those professional quilters out".

Personally, I have no problem with edge-to-edge on a busy quilt. If the
quilting ain't gonna show, why pay for the longarmer's time to do
something custom? By the same token, I cringe when someone has a top
with nice piecing and lots of open space for special quilting, and they
insist on edge-to-edge.
--
Kathy Applebaum
Kayney Quilting (longarm machine quilting)

 
 
 

Edge to edge quilting

Post by Linda Huf » Sat, 30 Jun 2001 01:55:36


And if you all believe THAT story I have some prime real-estate to sell you.

Judy's definition of a perfect lady leaves a lot to be desired.  I knew that
we were in for trouble at the quilt shop when Judy started grabbing bolts of
fabric out of Julie's hands and screaming, "But I want this one", like some
recalcitrant two year old.  Think that the lady at the cutting table showed
remarkable self-control thought it all.  It was clear from the look in her
eyes that she would have preferred an alternate use for that rotary cutter,
but she calmly cut Judy's fabric.

The saga didn't get much better at the "Bistro".  I was very suspicious when
Judy didn't even so much as flinch when I ordered the escargot.  But then I
didn't have long to wait for the other shoe to drop.  When our sever
delivered the delectable little morsels to our table, Judy started asking
our server where my meal was.  The conversation deteriorated till Judy
exclaimed "Why don't you go get another dozen or so of those little puppies
and find some bread?  They would make a great Poor Boy!"  At which point
Julie dissolved in peals of laughter and our server scurried away  with eyes
rolling and muttering something in French about the uncouth Americans.

I won't tell you the sordid detail of Judy shouting "OooLaLa  OooLaLa
OooLaLa" while chasing after our waiter, or of the lit matches she was
flinging at the table next to us.   I did my best to explain that you don't
flamb souffl.

For the record there were prices on the menu.  They were discreetly noted at
the end of the selection.  Please everyone, do NOT be tempted to take Judy
to any restaurant where the management frowns on its patrons wearing bibs.

Linda in IL
(who needs another glass of wine to calm her nerves)


Quote:
> Wow am I glad that I got here first!!  I want to tell my side of the
> story before those girls get on here and give you all the wrong
> impression!

> First, I want to say that I found another place that I can't afford to
> hang out  That would be Barrington ILL.  Julie, Linda and I met at a
> quilt shop up there and behaved like almost perfect ladies.  We shopped,
> we schmoozed, we stayed until they indicated that they wanted to go home
> and that we should too.  No problem, we decided just to move the
> SEXpedition over to a place to eat and then call it a night.

> There was a place in the same shopping center with a big sign  "BISTRO"
> so I suggested that we just stop there.  We entered and were seated by a
> tiny little woman with a figure to die for and a cute little accent.
> She handed us the menus and went in the corner to snicker at us. Well!
> Us three simple little country girls were shocked to find out that there
> were no prices on the menu---If you had to ask you can't afford!
> Bravely we looked at one another,--were we going to let those french
> waiters with the tight pants intimidate us?  No by golly!  So, we
> ordered appitizers and drinks.  I am happy to report that neither Julie
> nor myself embarrassed Linda by rolling on the floor and shouting
> EEEEUW!!  When she ordered escargot and that we conducted ourselves with
> GREAT DIGNITY AT ALL TIMES UNTIL WE LEFT THE PLACE!!
> that is my story and I'm sticking to it.
> Red Queen

 
 
 

Edge to edge quilting

Post by Patt » Sat, 30 Jun 2001 20:22:41




Quote:
>Of course you know me well enough :)  Which do you prefer Patti or Pat?

>I get what you mean by the explanation and can see where it would be
>appropriate, in fact it might be something I'll try with my Klimt
>quilts.  I think though it will take careful measurements though, unless
>I allowed the back of the edging to come over the backing as per
>standard binding.

>B

Thanks B
I do prefer Pat (the Patti is just my E-mail name!), though I don't
really mind these days - I used to!!!!!
Whoops, I forgot to mention about the careful measuring!
Kind Regards
Pat
 
 
 

Edge to edge quilting

Post by Patt » Sun, 01 Jul 2001 05:28:57




Quote:

>> Over the past few months, I have seen references here and there to 'edge
>> to edge quilting'; and one or two mentioned that this was 'not allowed'
>> in a particular show.

>snip
>> I have a
>> feeling it might have something to do with a quilt not having a binding?
>> If so, I do need to know, because I have started finishing some of my
>> quilts by using a facing.

>"Edge-to-edge" is what we longarmers call "pantograph". It's a quilt
>design that goes in rows (sometimes interlocking, sometimes not), and
>has no relation to the actual piecing.

>Some people also include an all-over freehand pattern in the
>"edge-to-edge" category, some don't.

Thanks very much indeed Kathy for the explanation.  Dragonfly was on the
right track.  I see where the name comes from now.  My quilts usually
fall into the 'busy' category!  and I usually try to relate the quilting
to the pattern, but as I have said before, I do find this difficult!!
It has been encouraging to find that other people do also.
what a pity we are thousands of miles apart - I could do your design and
piecing and you could do the quilting.  A great combination!!
Thanks again.
Best Regards
Pat
 
 
 

Edge to edge quilting

Post by Kathy Appleba » Sun, 01 Jul 2001 07:38:00


Quote:

> what a pity we are thousands of miles apart - I could do your design and
> piecing and you could do the quilting.

You aren't the first to offer that by a long shot! :)

I've been cheating lately, and doing hand-dyed wholecloth, or hand-dyed
fusible soft-center applique. (Say that one five times fast!)
--
Kathy Applebaum
Kayney Quilting (longarm machine quilting)

 
 
 

Edge to edge quilting

Post by orca » Mon, 02 Jul 2001 22:53:05


I don't know, Pat!  I'm still searching for an answer to the "edge-to-edge"
puzzle.  I've never heard that term before.
--
Ruth in Happy Camp


Quote:


> >Wow am I glad that I got here first!!  I want to tell my side of the
> >story before those girls get on here and give you all the wrong
> >impression!

> However did we get here???!!!!!
> Rgds
> Pat Storey