PIng: J* (Pumpkin thread)

PIng: J* (Pumpkin thread)

Post by Sherr » Thu, 20 Aug 2009 12:18:25



I've tried to reply to your post, but hours later it still hasn't
shown up. :-(
If this is a duplicate, my apologies.

Thank you for the pumpkin tips! First thing I'm doing wrong is not
buying the small
eating pumpkins (they call them pie pumpkins here?).

I am pretty much a food purist. I don't like a lot of seasonings, and
prefer baked, broiled
or steamed veggies. I'm wondering if the same seasonings that work on
sweet potatoes
would also lend themselves well to pumpkin.

Thanks again!

Sherry

 
 
 

PIng: J* (Pumpkin thread)

Post by J* » Thu, 20 Aug 2009 13:20:04


yep, sure the same herbs/spices/seasonings would work.
it is a naturally sweet vege too.
give it a go, have a play around and see what you come up with.
its not rocket science, it is pumpkin science.
have fun and do let us know how you get on with it.
j.

Quote:
"Sherry" wrote...

I've tried to reply to your post, but hours later it still hasn't
shown up. :-(
If this is a duplicate, my apologies.

Thank you for the pumpkin tips! First thing I'm doing wrong is not
buying the small
eating pumpkins (they call them pie pumpkins here?).

I am pretty much a food purist. I don't like a lot of seasonings, and
prefer baked, broiled
or steamed veggies. I'm wondering if the same seasonings that work on
sweet potatoes
would also lend themselves well to pumpkin.

Thanks again!

Sherry

 
 
 

PIng: J* (Pumpkin thread)

Post by Mary » Thu, 20 Aug 2009 15:10:47


One of my very favorite pumpkin recipes is as a vegetable side dish!
All you do is take a pie pumpkin and cut it into bitesize chunks --
cut the chunks first and then lay each chunk on its side and cut off
the rind. (It is almost impossible to peel a raw pumpkin!)  Then cut
onions into chunks.  Layer or toss them together in a baking dish,
sprinkle with a bit of brown sugar and a touch of cinnamon, and dot
with butter.  Cover with foil and bake in moderate oven until cooked
through.  Delicious stuff!  By the way, when pumpkins are plentiful
you can cut them into the chunks and freeze to use later.
 
 
 

PIng: J* (Pumpkin thread)

Post by Belinda Alen » Thu, 20 Aug 2009 23:23:15


Quote:

>I am pretty much a food purist. I don't like a lot of seasonings,
>and prefer baked, broiledor steamed veggies. I'm wondering if
>the same seasonings that work on sweet potatoes would also
>lend themselves well to pumpkin.

Yes, pumpkin can be used much like sweet potatoes.  You can also put the chunks
of raw pumpkin in the blender with enough water to allow the blender to reduce
the pumpkin to a slurry, then cook it down like mashed potatoes.

It can also be sliced and battered, then fried like you would summer squash.
Pumpkin adds a little something different to battered fried vegetable platters.
As long as you tell no one what you have done before hand, most folks think it
tastes great.

 
 
 

PIng: J* (Pumpkin thread)

Post by J* » Fri, 21 Aug 2009 05:05:46


hi Belinda,
you blend it before it is cooked?
how odd.
is that how you make mashed potatoes too?
we cook it til soft, then use a regular hand potato masher.
if cooked well it mashes easier than potatoes.
we've been known to mash them together too.
when the kids were little they liked it like that.
j.

Quote:
"Belinda Alene"  wrote...

Yes, pumpkin can be used much like sweet potatoes.  You can also put the
chunks
of raw pumpkin in the blender with enough water to allow the blender to
reduce
the pumpkin to a slurry, then cook it down like mashed potatoes.

It can also be sliced and battered, then fried like you would summer squash.
Pumpkin adds a little something different to battered fried vegetable
platters.
As long as you tell no one what you have done before hand, most folks think
it
tastes great.

 
 
 

PIng: J* (Pumpkin thread)

Post by Belinda Alen » Sat, 22 Aug 2009 08:51:33


Quote:

>hi Belinda,
>you blend it before it is cooked?

I blend pumpkin before cooking because it helps make a smoother mash.

Quote:
>how odd.
>is that how you make mashed potatoes too?

No, I put whole, clean potatoes in the microwave for about five minutes (varies
by machine).  Once the potatoes are cooked, then they can be served as baked or
mixed with seasonings and milk/ cream/ cream cheese for mashed potatoes.

Quote:
>we cook it til soft, then use a regular hand potato masher.
>if cooked well it mashes easier than potatoes.
>we've been known to mash them together too.
>when the kids were little they liked it like that.
>j.

I used to do potatoes this way, but with the invention of the microwave have
found a faster and easier answer.
 
 
 

PIng: J* (Pumpkin thread)

Post by J* » Sat, 22 Aug 2009 09:04:19


bypassing the spuds cooking cuz i understood that ok.
i'll stick my neck out here, nothing new in that.

i cant wrap my head around blending pumpkin first then cooking it.
sounds like it cooks up a bit like a soup.
maybe our pumpkin is harder cuz i dont think any of my machines would blend
it into a slush (with water) without giving out some really weird sounds
from the strain of blending hard pumpkin.
our pumpkin is always really soft and creamy when mashed after cooking..
i'm sure i'm missing some vital element in this process.
iir,
j.

"Belinda Alene"  wrote ...

Quote:

>hi Belinda,
>you blend it before it is cooked?

I blend pumpkin before cooking because it helps make a smoother mash.