Question on "lights" vs "brights"

Question on "lights" vs "brights"

Post by D Johnso » Thu, 26 Mar 1998 04:00:00



I have a packet lights, brights, mediums, and darks. My
question is the proper use of brights vs lights. While I
certainly like the brighter colors, I'm sure you wouldn't
use them in place of lights. Need some advise. TIA
Diane in Norfolk

 
 
 

Question on "lights" vs "brights"

Post by KatQuil » Thu, 26 Mar 1998 04:00:00


Hi, Diane, et. al :

My feelings about color usage is that if done carefully, any combination of
colors can "work."  Shading of the individual colors from light to dark is
important as well as "bridging" the colors....,meaning no strong jumps from one
color to another.

The "bright" is one color that is just a bit brighter than the other colors.
This is the spark that gives a quilt life, and is used in small amounts.  The
"bright" is relative.  If your quilt has a pastel palette, your "bright" may be
a pink or a yellow that is just a bit brighter than the rest.  If the top has a
dark palette, it may be a fuschia or a bright gold.

Another important ingredient is a "dark,"  also used in small amounts, and also
relative.  The "dark" in one quilt may appear as a "medium" in another.  It all
depends on the entire picture.  But I do try to use a little "bright" and a
little "dark" in each quilt, and I have never been disappointed.

So, by all means, use those lights !  But don't forget a " bright" for
guaranteed sparkle!

Kathy Riley
Holbrook, NY

 
 
 

Question on "lights" vs "brights"

Post by Teresa Atkinso » Fri, 27 Mar 1998 04:00:00


Personally I would not hesitate to use brights instead of lights, especially
if I were doing a warm/cool color contrast, like blue and orange.  mmmm
Yummy!

Teresa

Quote:

>I have a packet lights, brights, mediums, and darks. My
>question is the proper use of brights vs lights. While I
>certainly like the brighter colors, I'm sure you wouldn't
>use them in place of lights. Need some advise. TIA
>Diane in Norfolk

 
 
 

Question on "lights" vs "brights"

Post by Cher Ann Holt-forti » Sat, 28 Mar 1998 04:00:00


Does anyone else out there have my monchrome disease? i can't seem to get
contrast into the color scheme, even when I think I have it, without going
to what look like wild colors to me.  I do darks and mediums ok, but the
brights don't seem to be part of my visual field or some such.
And is there remedy for that besides always shopping with a friend.
Cher

Quote:

> Personally I would not hesitate to use brights instead of lights, especially
> if I were doing a warm/cool color contrast, like blue and orange.  mmmm
> Yummy!

> Teresa


> >I have a packet lights, brights, mediums, and darks. My
> >question is the proper use of brights vs lights. While I
> >certainly like the brighter colors, I'm sure you wouldn't
> >use them in place of lights. Need some advise. TIA
> >Diane in Norfolk

 
 
 

Question on "lights" vs "brights"

Post by Dian » Sat, 28 Mar 1998 04:00:00


Get a sheet of red see-thru plastic or celophane. They do sell these for
this purpose. I think it's called a value finder(?). I've seen them at
Hancock's and JoAnn's.

Diane from Cincinnati

Quote:

> Does anyone else out there have my monchrome disease? i can't seem to get
> contrast into the color scheme, even when I think I have it, without going
> to what look like wild colors to me.  I do darks and mediums ok, but the
> brights don't seem to be part of my visual field or some such.
> And is there remedy for that besides always shopping with a friend.
> Cher


> > Personally I would not hesitate to use brights instead of lights, especially
> > if I were doing a warm/cool color contrast, like blue and orange.  mmmm
> > Yummy!

> > Teresa


> > >I have a packet lights, brights, mediums, and darks. My
> > >question is the proper use of brights vs lights. While I
> > >certainly like the brighter colors, I'm sure you wouldn't
> > >use them in place of lights. Need some advise. TIA
> > >Diane in Norfolk

 
 
 

Question on "lights" vs "brights"

Post by D Johnso » Sat, 28 Mar 1998 04:00:00


Diane,
Great suggestion. I should be able to "see" how the
placement works with this.
Diane in Norfolk

 
 
 

Question on "lights" vs "brights"

Post by sarah curry smit » Sat, 28 Mar 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

> Does anyone else out there have my monchrome disease? i can't seem to get
> contrast into the color scheme, even when I think I have it, without going
> to what look like wild colors to me.  I do darks and mediums ok, but the
> brights don't seem to be part of my visual field or some such.
> And is there remedy for that besides always shopping with a friend.
> Cher

Been there, done that, Cher (that quilt, ALL-TICK-ONE-TOCK-TONE-TICK,
resides on the seat of Bubba-the-Truck -- and does fine, there).

Took me a while to "see" what my penchant for the darks, jewel tones,
and VIBRANTS (on the wild side) did, and when I figured it out, decided
I was gonna have to DO something about that.  So, now, when I sally
forth with antennae waving, nose a-quiver, for some serious S.E.X., I
make SURE I pick up a LIGHT.   I MAKE myself do it.  Sometimes, I just
snatch a light FQ from a bin as I make a bee-line for the BOLTS of rich
fabric.  Sometimes (I now have quite a nice stash of white-on-whites and
white-on-ecrus),  I just look around and say, "it's a LIGHT day,
Knothead."  
        Do I still make a check-it block and end up with the same hues muddying
together?  YUP.  That's what check-it blocks are for.
        The red plastic stuff works well for getting you past the colors, so
you can see the VALUES of your fabrics when they're together ... and I
chuckle.
        I just about wrote, "but there's a better thing, a bit more expensive,
but easier to keep track of than the crinkly red plastic, called a ...
Ruby .... ahhhh ... a Ruby ...."
        And then ran in to the sewing room to snatch it off the wall and see
what it's called ... and yeah, so much for "easier to keep track of".
My Ruby Beholder (I remembered what it was) has clearly been stole by
the Quilt Grinch.
        So much for that "easier to keep track of stuff.
        Happy trails,
        Sarah in Las Cruces, NM

 
 
 

Question on "lights" vs "brights"

Post by Christie E. Bur » Sun, 29 Mar 1998 04:00:00


I am working on a thing right now... not exactly a quilt, but it may become one
someday... for a textile art class.  I dyed ten (?) different colors, mostly
darks.  I tried to get a nice clear light yellow and a similar orange to use in
small quantities... but the yellow came out "hunter's orange," and the orange
did too (only more so).  So what I have is a bright blue, a dark turquoise, a
bright red, a dark wine color, two very-similar greens, a lovely soft gold
(this was a complete fluke, but I LIKE it), deep purple, and go-to-hell orange
(as MSM would call it).  I left the second orange out entirely.

Point being, I tried for lights and got brights instead.  The colors work
really well together; I think the deal is that either lights or brights will
add sparkle to your quilt.  You don't necessarily need both (though I would
lean toward brights with black and darker colors).

Christie :)

Quote:
> Personally I would not hesitate to use brights instead of lights, especially
> if I were doing a warm/cool color contrast, like blue and orange.  mmmm
> Yummy!

> Teresa


>>I have a packet lights, brights, mediums, and darks. My
>>question is the proper use of brights vs lights. While I
>>certainly like the brighter colors, I'm sure you wouldn't
>>use them in place of lights. Need some advise. TIA
>>Diane in Norfolk

 
 
 

Question on "lights" vs "brights"

Post by EAmstu » Mon, 30 Mar 1998 04:00:00


One of the books I purchased at the Dallas quilt show was a book on color.
Found a booth that was nothing but quilt books - so was able to compare their
books on color.  After much hemming and hawing finally decided on "Color Magic
for Quilters" by Ann Seely and Joyce Stewart.  It is a delight to look at and
hopefully I will learn from it.  They have included how-to's on all the quilts
they use as examples - some are wall***s, a few have several size options,
and include paper piecing and regular piecing.

However ----- they don't address "lights vs. brights" as such. Quote from book:
"One of the common pitfalls when designing and planning a quilt is using too
many medium-value fabrics". This can be remedied by changing a few of those
mediums to lights and darks - and they show examples.

Perhaps with the help of this book I just might try a Mystery Quilt again.  The
one I did try ended up in the trash can because it was so 'blah'.

Quote:

>> Does anyone else out there have my monchrome disease? i can't seem to get
>> contrast into the color scheme, even when I think I have it, without going
>> to what look like wild colors to me.  I do darks and mediums ok, but the
>> brights don't seem to be part of my visual field or some such.
>> And is there remedy for that besides always shopping with a friend.
>> Cher

And Sarah - does that Ruby-beholder thingie really help ----------

          (stuff snipped)            

Quote:
>    The red plastic stuff works well for getting you past the colors, so
>you can see the VALUES of your fabrics when they're together ... and I
>chuckle.
>    I just about wrote, "but there's a better thing, a bit more expensive,
>but easier to keep track of than the crinkly red plastic, called a ...
>Ruby .... ahhhh ... a Ruby ...."
>    And then ran in to the sewing room to snatch it off the wall and see
>what it's called ... and yeah, so much for "easier to keep track of".
>My Ruby Beholder (I remembered what it was) has clearly been stole by
>the Quilt Grinch.

---------when you can find it, that is?

Ellen in Sandusky, OH where spring has sprung and the daffodils are blooming.

 
 
 

Question on "lights" vs "brights"

Post by Hoatzi » Mon, 30 Mar 1998 04:00:00


You might want to try the guru of color:Jinny Beyer.
Roberta/FL

 
 
 

Question on "lights" vs "brights"

Post by Pam » Mon, 30 Mar 1998 04:00:00


One of those red plastic ruby beholder thingees might work.  It cancels out
the color so you can see how light/dark a fabric is.  Another (cheaper)
method that usually works is to squint your eyes almost closed, so you can't
really see the color of the fabric, just how light or dark it is.

Hope these ideas help.....

Pam (near Seattle)

Quote:

>Does anyone else out there have my monchrome disease? i can't seem to get
>contrast into the color scheme, even when I think I have it, without going
>to what look like wild colors to me.  I do darks and mediums ok, but the
>brights don't seem to be part of my visual field or some such.
>And is there remedy for that besides always shopping with a friend.
>Cher

 
 
 

Question on "lights" vs "brights"

Post by JANE » Tue, 31 Mar 1998 04:00:00


Yes Cher, I do.  I always seem to plan monochromatic color schemes but
at least now I go light to dark.  Still, I guess a splash of bright
would help.  I did my second quilt in shades of blues and tho the lady
in the quilt store tried to guide me in another direction I bought the
fabric but just didn't use it.  I had the quilt half quilted when we had
a flood in the house while we were in N.J. and the pins all rusted in
[now I have brass pins too!, other thread] and had some mildew spots
that wouldn't come out and it is in a box in the garage and when I get
it out and look at it, it looks rather blah.  So I guess someone up
there was trying to tell me something!  At least I think I'm getting
better.
       Keep trying, it will come.

      BLESS THE 'PIECEMAKERS'!!            
                            Janet

 
 
 

Question on "lights" vs "brights"

Post by Nancy » Tue, 31 Mar 1998 04:00:00


I love the ruby beholder-we keep one at the quilt shop I work in for anyone to
use, and a supply of them to sell.  I have heard that you can also get great
results by going to *mart or the likes, and picking up one of those red plastic
page dividers-full page in red!  If you try this, pick one up in green, because
for red/orange fabrics the green will act in the same manner without cancelling
out the red color.
Nancy

 
 
 

Question on "lights" vs "brights"

Post by Carolyn &/or Stev » Wed, 01 Apr 1998 04:00:00


Dang-it-all, I have one of those things (but it's florescent pink) and my
brain keeps telling me the "real" colors anyway. Maybe I need to go with
the red and/or green?

Another nice trick (if you have kids, and the kids have kiddy binoculars)
is to look at everything through the wrong end of the binocs. This
displaces the object you're viewing by several feet--you'd be amazed at how
far everything can look, and how the really gawdawful (which usually
translates to BLAH) color combos stick out! This may well work with regular
binocs, but the smaller sized kiddy ones fit the face much easier.
--
Carolyn in Harlingen, TX (who can't seem to "see" any of the wonderful
yellows and oranges everyone else manages to find)
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Ranch/4775



Quote:
> One of those red plastic ruby beholder thingees might work.  It cancels
out
> the color so you can see how light/dark a fabric is.  Another (cheaper)
> method that usually works is to squint your eyes almost closed, so you
can't
> really see the color of the fabric, just how light or dark it is.

> Hope these ideas help.....

> Pam (near Seattle)


> >Does anyone else out there have my monchrome disease? i can't seem to
get
> >contrast into the color scheme, even when I think I have it, without
going
> >to what look like wild colors to me.  I do darks and mediums ok, but the
> >brights don't seem to be part of my visual field or some such.
> >And is there remedy for that besides always shopping with a friend.
> >Cher

 
 
 

Question on "lights" vs "brights"

Post by Cary Springe » Wed, 01 Apr 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

> Another nice trick (if you have kids, and the kids have kiddy binoculars)
> is to look at everything through the wrong end of the binocs. This
> displaces the object you're viewing by several feet--you'd be amazed at how
> far everything can look, and how the really gawdawful (which usually
> translates to BLAH) color combos stick out! This may well work with regular
> binocs, but the smaller sized kiddy ones fit the face much easier.
> --
> Carolyn in Harlingen, TX

Another thing you can use to put distance between you and the quilt is
one of those peepholes that go in a door. My mom lent me hers for a
colorwash class and I am still using it. Unlike the binoculars, this is
small enough to fit in a sewing basket or box, about 1 1/2 long and 1/2
inch wide. And I am assuming it is also quite inexpensive - after all my
mom hasn't come after me yet to get hers back.

Cary in Knoxville-Home of the Lady Vols!!!