making a new ticking for a down comforter

making a new ticking for a down comforter

Post by Helen R. Mart » Sun, 19 Dec 1999 04:00:00



I have a heritage down comforter that was made by my grandmother from the geese
they kept on their farm..   I love it.. its about twice as thick as one of the
commercial comforters that you can find on the market, but perhaps it is also a
mix of down and small feathers...

the cover is torn, and quite dirty..  and I would like to redo it.. however the
project scares me silly...   how am I going to control all those feathers flying
around and where am I going to find instructions on how to make a new cover..  
I'd like to make a baffled cover like the new commercial comforters have...
what are the requirements of the fabric for the cover?   I suspect it should be
a really high thread count and very tight..  are there special suppliers for
such stuff..

any one out there with experience in this area who can give me some ideas and
support...

much appreciated...

Helen
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making a new ticking for a down comforter

Post by joseph doremir » Sun, 19 Dec 1999 04:00:00


My Grandmother used to make these. She would use pillow ticking for the first
covering which my Mom would channel stitch---remember 2 of my Aunts helping her put
it 'thru the needle' as they called it. Then she would make a casing of solid fabric
(much like a pillowcase) and then dad would bring the 10' 2x4's in and the c clamps
and put it up on the chair backs. The ladies would tie thru the 'pillowcase,
ticking, and feathers...and fold the last end into itself and Mom would 'thru the
needle' the end.  When it got too dirty to stay on the bed, the ties would be cut
off and the 'pillowcase' washed and 'back to the tieing' until the coverlet was
deemed no longer tieable.
Butterfly
Quote:

> I have a heritage down comforter that was made by my grandmother from the geese
> they kept on their farm..   I love it.. its about twice as thick as one of the
> commercial comforters that you can find on the market, but perhaps it is also a
> mix of down and small feathers...

> the cover is torn, and quite dirty..  and I would like to redo it.. however the
> project scares me silly...   how am I going to control all those feathers flying
> around and where am I going to find instructions on how to make a new cover..
> I'd like to make a baffled cover like the new commercial comforters have...
> what are the requirements of the fabric for the cover?   I suspect it should be
> a really high thread count and very tight..  are there special suppliers for
> such stuff..

> any one out there with experience in this area who can give me some ideas and
> support...

> much appreciated...

> Helen
> -------------------------------------------------------------

> delete spam protection from email address to reply by email :)


 
 
 

making a new ticking for a down comforter

Post by Miriam » Sun, 19 Dec 1999 04:00:00


Try Cuddledown in Freeport Maine --  They will also wash (clean??) the down.
They are quite pricey but real goose down is worth it.

and no, I don't have any connection except to wander in sometimes and treat
myself by  buying fabric they have discontinued making comforters from.  I
recently got a wonderful Monet waterlily garden fabric (105") for backing on
a future quilt.

Mim


Quote:
>I have a heritage down comforter that was made by my grandmother from the
geese
>they kept on their farm..   I love it.. its about twice as thick as one of
the
>commercial comforters that you can find on the market, but perhaps it is
also a
>mix of down and small feathers...

>the cover is torn, and quite dirty..  and I would like to redo it.. however
the
>project scares me silly...   how am I going to control all those feathers
flying
>around and where am I going to find instructions on how to make a new
cover..
>I'd like to make a baffled cover like the new commercial comforters have...
>what are the requirements of the fabric for the cover?   I suspect it
should be
>a really high thread count and very tight..  are there special suppliers
for
>such stuff..

>any one out there with experience in this area who can give me some ideas
and
>support...

>much appreciated...

>Helen
>-------------------------------------------------------------

>delete spam protection from email address to reply by email :)

 
 
 

making a new ticking for a down comforter

Post by nom.. » Mon, 20 Dec 1999 04:00:00


Hellen, the only place I know that you could get the fabric is a very good sheet
sale.    At Luxury Linen here they have I think up to 310 count.     as for the
baffles????   Oh boy what a job you are tackleing!    I have only made a pillowcase
type, and put the old inside!     Christina
Quote:

> I have a heritage down comforter that was made by my grandmother from the geese
> they kept on their farm..   I love it.. its about twice as thick as one of the
> commercial comforters that you can find on the market, but perhaps it is also a
> mix of down and small feathers...

> the cover is torn, and quite dirty..  and I would like to redo it.. however the
> project scares me silly...   how am I going to control all those feathers flying
> around and where am I going to find instructions on how to make a new cover..
> I'd like to make a baffled cover like the new commercial comforters have...
> what are the requirements of the fabric for the cover?   I suspect it should be
> a really high thread count and very tight..  are there special suppliers for
> such stuff..

> any one out there with experience in this area who can give me some ideas and
> support...

> much appreciated...

> Helen
> -------------------------------------------------------------

> delete spam protection from email address to reply by email :)

 
 
 

making a new ticking for a down comforter

Post by herber » Mon, 20 Dec 1999 04:00:00


I had 2 similar comforters, made by DH's granny. Being less brave than you
are, I took them to a shop to have new ticking made.
The shop expert ripped open a corner of the old comforter and examined the
filling. Mixed feathers and down, as you said, but also a lot of dust and
grime. Conclusion: my 2 old comforters would fill 1 decent new comforter.
The shop took out all the feathers and steam cleaned them (killing hordes of
happy dust mites no doubt). Then installed them in new ticking, with sewn
channels in the modern way (so all the feathers don't fall down in one end).
Made a really nice comforter at about half the cost of a new one. Gave it to
one of my DDs and bought 2 new ones for DH and me :-)
BTW, modern down comforters, at least the ones available here, are machine
washable.
Roberta in DK (who once made new covers for old pillows and will never try
THAT again. Life is too short and pillows too cheap.)



Quote:
> I have a heritage down comforter that was made by my grandmother from the
geese
> they kept on their farm..   I love it.. its about twice as thick as one of
the
> commercial comforters that you can find on the market, but perhaps it is
also a
> mix of down and small feathers...

> the cover is torn, and quite dirty..  and I would like to redo it..
however the
> project scares me silly...   how am I going to control all those feathers
flying
> around and where am I going to find instructions on how to make a new
cover..
> I'd like to make a baffled cover like the new commercial comforters
have...
> what are the requirements of the fabric for the cover?   I suspect it
should be
> a really high thread count and very tight..  are there special suppliers
for
> such stuff..

> any one out there with experience in this area who can give me some ideas
and
> support...

> much appreciated...

> Helen
> -------------------------------------------------------------

> delete spam protection from email address to reply by email :)

 
 
 

making a new ticking for a down comforter

Post by Kathy I. Morg » Mon, 20 Dec 1999 04:00:00



Quote:
> I have a heritage down comforter that was made by my grandmother from the
> geese they kept on their farm..   I love it.. its about twice as thick as
> one of the commercial comforters that you can find on the market, but
> perhaps it is also a mix of down and small feathers...

> the cover is torn, and quite dirty..  and I would like to redo it..
> however the project scares me silly...   how am I going to control all
> those feathers flying around

You can partially control them by first putting the old comforter in a
freezer for a day or two.  When you take it out of the freezer and start
removing the down, it will be much colder that room air temperature, so
moisture from the air will condense on it.  The slightly-water-coated
feathers have less static and are a bit heavier, so they're a little
less inclined to fly all over the room.  It doesn't work perfectly, but
it does help.

Quote:
> and where am I going to find instructions on how to make a new cover.. I'd
> like to make a baffled cover like the new commercial comforters have...
> what are the requirements of the fabric for the cover?   I suspect it
> should be a really high thread count and very tight..  are there special
> suppliers for such stuff..

Most waterproof fabrics are also down-proof, so look for uncoated
waterproof nylons or blends.  As others have mentioned, feather ticking
is also downproof, or a very high-count cotton would work.  Frostline
makes down kits and also sells fabric, so you could contact them for
fabric, but there are lots of other places that also sell suitable
fabrics.

It is better to wash down than to dryclean it, so look for a washable
fabric that would permit you to throw the whole thing in the washing
machine as needed.  Dry at low temperature with a pair of clean tennis
shoes--it makes a terrible racket, but the tennies help to plump up the
feathers inside the comforter (or jacket or whatever).

What kind of baffles are you talking about?  If you mean true baffles,
like that used in sleeping bags, that might be a bit tricky to sew--i'd
experiment on s***fabric to develop a workable technique.  If you just
want quilting lines that hold the two layers together, you can draw a
line to follow using any eraseable marker (air erase, cold water erase,
chalk), pin at intervals, and then sew the lines.

First sew together around three sides of the two layers, right sides
together, turn, mark your channels, and sew them.  Now stuff each
channel from the open end, folding it over and pinning to keep the pesky
down inside while you continue filling the channels.  Once all the
channels are sewn, machine stitch the folded over end to permanently
secure the down inside.

You'd use a similar method, modified for the baffling, if you're doing
proper baffles.  (I've never sewn any with baffles, so I don't know just
how tricky that is or exactly how it's done.  I'd have to play with a
bit of fabric and do some trial and error.)

PS...I almost forgot--if you use nylon, sear the edges to prevent
raveling!
--
Kathy
help for new users of newsgroups at <http://www.FoundCollection.com/~kmorgan>
Good Net Keeping Seal of Approval at <http://www.FoundCollection.com/%7Ejs/gnksa/>

 
 
 

making a new ticking for a down comforter

Post by herber » Tue, 21 Dec 1999 04:00:00


Just realized: posting from DH's computer gives me DH's signature (DUH).
Sorry! It's still me, but my computer isn't speaking to the modem these
days.
Roberta in DK


Quote:
> I had 2 similar comforters, made by DH's granny. Being less brave than you
> are, I took them to a shop to have new ticking made.
> The shop expert ripped open a corner of the old comforter and examined the
> filling. Mixed feathers and down, as you said, but also a lot of dust and
> grime. Conclusion: my 2 old comforters would fill 1 decent new comforter.
> The shop took out all the feathers and steam cleaned them (killing hordes
of
> happy dust mites no doubt). Then installed them in new ticking, with sewn
> channels in the modern way (so all the feathers don't fall down in one
end).
> Made a really nice comforter at about half the cost of a new one. Gave it
to
> one of my DDs and bought 2 new ones for DH and me :-)
> BTW, modern down comforters, at least the ones available here, are machine
> washable.
> Roberta in DK (who once made new covers for old pillows and will never try
> THAT again. Life is too short and pillows too cheap.)



> > I have a heritage down comforter that was made by my grandmother from
the
> geese
> > they kept on their farm..   I love it.. its about twice as thick as one
of
> the
> > commercial comforters that you can find on the market, but perhaps it is
> also a
> > mix of down and small feathers...

> > the cover is torn, and quite dirty..  and I would like to redo it..
> however the
> > project scares me silly...   how am I going to control all those
feathers
> flying
> > around and where am I going to find instructions on how to make a new
> cover..
> > I'd like to make a baffled cover like the new commercial comforters
> have...
> > what are the requirements of the fabric for the cover?   I suspect it
> should be
> > a really high thread count and very tight..  are there special suppliers
> for
> > such stuff..

> > any one out there with experience in this area who can give me some
ideas
> and
> > support...

> > much appreciated...

> > Helen
> > -------------------------------------------------------------

> > delete spam protection from email address to reply by email :)