First big quilt finished! (and one last question)

First big quilt finished! (and one last question)

Post by PamBe » Mon, 29 Sep 1997 04:00:00



I just finished my first bed (queen) size quilt today, and feel very
mellow and good.  I think instead of a happy dance, I will celebrate by
getting in my jammies and getting underneath and snuggling up with it as
soon as I finish this post.

My quilt is 100% machine done, from piecing to binding.  It is a scrappy
pastel LeMoyne Star with yellow print sashing and borders, and a very
simple diagonal grid quilting pattern.  I got and used many good ideas from
this newsgroup, so thanks to you all for that.  One thing I want to share
is the good experience I had with Fairfield Cotton Classic batting.  I had
never used this before, but chose it because it is thin and I thought would
be easier to roll up to shove under the machine.  It was easy to roll, but
was also very stable.  Even with all the wrestling, pulling and pushing it
got, I managed to quilt the whole thing with no puckers on front and only
two on back.  The Cotton Classic really sticks to the fabric.  

My one last question is about washing.  Another reason I bought this
particular batting is because it is supposed to shrink "slightly," which I
want for the antiquey look.  However, how do I go about washing this thing?
I have a large capacity top load washer.  Will that do?  What cycle,
detergent, dryer setting, etc.?  I guess I really have more than "one" last
question, after all.

TIA,

Pam
Miami FL

 
 
 

First big quilt finished! (and one last question)

Post by frien » Mon, 29 Sep 1997 04:00:00


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Pam, please keep in mind that I can in NO way be considered an authority on
this subject, but if it were me, I would put it in the bathtub with cool to
lukewarm water and a spoonful of Orvus soap and walk on it (with clean feet of
course) like I was squishing grapes for wine.  Then I would let the water out,
***ing on it some more to get as much of the soapy water out as possible.
Then fill the tub and squish it again, repeating this step til the water had no
soap in it.

I would slide a towel under it to lift it out (so that there would be no stress
on the stitching) and spread it to dry on a sheet, either on the floor or
outside (put another sheet on top, in case the birds are practicing their aim).

I know this seems like a lot of work, but it really is a gentle way to clean a
quilt, and usually only needs to be done once or twice a year.  It will help
your quilt to last a long long time, and also keep the colors from fading too
much.

If you do choose to machine wash, use the Orvus soap anyway (1 spoonful per
wash load).

Hope this helps!
Patty

Quote:

> I just finished my first bed (queen) size quilt today, and feel very
> mellow and good.  I think instead of a happy dance, I will celebrate by
> getting in my jammies and getting underneath and snuggling up with it as
> soon as I finish this post.

> My quilt is 100% machine done, from piecing to binding.  It is a scrappy
> pastel LeMoyne Star with yellow print sashing and borders, and a very
> simple diagonal grid quilting pattern.  I got and used many good ideas from
> this newsgroup, so thanks to you all for that.  One thing I want to share
> is the good experience I had with Fairfield Cotton Classic batting.  I had
> never used this before, but chose it because it is thin and I thought would
> be easier to roll up to shove under the machine.  It was easy to roll, but
> was also very stable.  Even with all the wrestling, pulling and pushing it
> got, I managed to quilt the whole thing with no puckers on front and only
> two on back.  The Cotton Classic really sticks to the fabric.

> My one last question is about washing.  Another reason I bought this
> particular batting is because it is supposed to shrink "slightly," which I
> want for the antiquey look.  However, how do I go about washing this thing?
> I have a large capacity top load washer.  Will that do?  What cycle,
> detergent, dryer setting, etc.?  I guess I really have more than "one" last
> question, after all.

> TIA,

> Pam
> Miami FL

--------------82CFAD11E672212FF05DEC53
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Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

<HTML>
<TT>Pam, please keep in mind that I can in NO way be considered an authority
on this subject, but if it were me, I would put it in the bathtub with
cool to lukewarm water and a spoonful of Orvus soap and walk on it (with
clean feet of course) like I was squishing grapes for wine.&nbsp; Then
I would let the water out, ***ing on it some more to get as much of the
soapy water out as possible.&nbsp; Then fill the tub and squish it again,
repeating this step til the water had no soap in it.</TT><TT></TT>

<P><TT>I would slide a towel under it to lift it out (so that there would
be no stress on the stitching) and spread it to dry on a sheet, either
on the floor or outside (put another sheet on top, in case the birds are
practicing their aim).</TT><TT></TT>

<P><TT>I know this seems like a lot of work, but it really is a gentle
way to clean a quilt, and usually only needs to be done once or twice a
year.&nbsp; It will help your quilt to last a long long time, and also
keep the colors from fading too much.</TT><TT></TT>

<P><TT>If you do choose to machine wash, use the Orvus soap anyway (1 spoonful
per wash load).</TT><TT></TT>

<P><TT>Hope this helps!</TT>
<BR><TT>Patty</TT>
<BR><TT></TT>&nbsp;

<BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE>I just finished my first bed (queen) size quilt today,
and feel very
<BR>mellow and good.&nbsp; I think instead of a happy dance, I will celebrate
by
<BR>getting in my jammies and getting underneath and snuggling up with
it as
<BR>soon as I finish this post.

<P>My quilt is 100% machine done, from piecing to binding.&nbsp; It is
a scrappy
<BR>pastel LeMoyne Star with yellow print sashing and borders, and a very
<BR>simple diagonal grid quilting pattern.&nbsp; I got and used many good
ideas from
<BR>this newsgroup, so thanks to you all for that.&nbsp; One thing I want
to share
<BR>is the good experience I had with Fairfield Cotton Classic batting.&nbsp;
I had
<BR>never used this before, but chose it because it is thin and I thought
would
<BR>be easier to roll up to shove under the machine.&nbsp; It was easy
to roll, but
<BR>was also very stable.&nbsp; Even with all the wrestling, pulling and
pushing it
<BR>got, I managed to quilt the whole thing with no puckers on front and
only
<BR>two on back.&nbsp; The Cotton Classic really sticks to the fabric.

<P>My one last question is about washing.&nbsp; Another reason I bought
this
<BR>particular batting is because it is supposed to shrink "slightly,"
which I
<BR>want for the antiquey look.&nbsp; However, how do I go about washing
this thing?
<BR>I have a large capacity top load washer.&nbsp; Will that do?&nbsp;
What cycle,
<BR>detergent, dryer setting, etc.?&nbsp; I guess I really have more than
"one" last
<BR>question, after all.

<P>TIA,

<P>Pam
<BR>Miami FL</BLOCKQUOTE>
&nbsp;</HTML>

--------------82CFAD11E672212FF05DEC53--

 
 
 

First big quilt finished! (and one last question)

Post by Rendell & Florence Davi » Mon, 29 Sep 1997 04:00:00


Hi, Pam,
     Congratulations on finishing your queen-size quilt!  The only time
I've ever regretted having a queen=size bed was when I realized how big
a quilt I'd have to make to cover it!  But it's worth all the time,
etc., isn't it?
      As far as washing it goes, my quilts (the ones I make, that is) go
right into my top-loading washer.  i do set the thing on "delicate" but
that's all the pampering they get.  And when the washer is done with
them, they go right in the dryer.  My aging back will no longer do the
"bend over the bathtub" bit and our desert landscaped yard has no place
to spread a quilt to dry in the sun -- the only grass is a one foot
square area where I grow grass for the cats to nibble!  But I've found
that my quilts hold up to the washer/dryer routine very well.  
     Happy quilting,
                    Florence, in Tucson where summer is still*** on
--and on -- and on!

 
 
 

First big quilt finished! (and one last question)

Post by sarah curry smit » Mon, 29 Sep 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> I just finished my first bed (queen) size quilt today, and feel very
> mellow and good.  I think instead of a happy dance, I will celebrate by
> getting in my jammies and getting underneath and snuggling up with it as
> soon as I finish this post.

> My quilt is 100% machine done, from piecing to binding.  It is a scrappy
> pastel LeMoyne Star with yellow print sashing and borders, and a very
> simple diagonal grid quilting pattern.  I got and used many good ideas from
> this newsgroup, so thanks to you all for that.  One thing I want to share
> is the good experience I had with Fairfield Cotton Classic batting.  I had
> never used this before, but chose it because it is thin and I thought would
> be easier to roll up to shove under the machine.  It was easy to roll, but
> was also very stable.  Even with all the wrestling, pulling and pushing it
> got, I managed to quilt the whole thing with no puckers on front and only
> two on back.  The Cotton Classic really sticks to the fabric.

> My one last question is about washing.  Another reason I bought this
> particular batting is because it is supposed to shrink "slightly," which I
> want for the antiquey look.  However, how do I go about washing this thing?
> I have a large capacity top load washer.  Will that do?  What cycle,
> detergent, dryer setting, etc.?  I guess I really have more than "one" last
> question, after all.

> TIA,

> Pam
> Miami FL

GREAT, Pam!!!!  Your quilt sounds super.  Yes, your top-load washer will
work.  I may get in trouble for this (after all, we purists are oncly
supposed to use COLD water), but I dump (yeah, well, my notion is that I
HOPE my quilt will be dragged, and dumped, and picnicked on, and used to
make a cave, and WASHED, in the machine (understand, Newbies, that I'm a
machine piecer, and a machine quilter, and I am not DISTRAUGHT that I
loved my grandmother's quilt-for-me so much that it simply, like the
*Velve*** Rabbit*, fell apart)  every quilt in the machine, on WARM
(so, it's BETTER to work with cold, but not everyone understands that).
        I watch the machine fill up, and I let it agitate for about 30
seconds, and I whip it to  spin.  (if the quilt has marks on it, for
quilting lines, I extend this a bit).  Fill up for rinse, whook the
agitator a couple of times, and spin.  
        And then (god forbid), I put the quilt in the DRYER.  My notion
is that it had better get used to what it'll go though (and besides, the
dryer is WONDERFUL for the old-timey puckers).  
        Hmph. Of COURSE I *RECOMMEND* nothing but Orvus soap, and no
sunlight, and on-the-lawn-on-a-sheet-in-the-shade, in my long "care and
feeding of your quilt" (written) lecture which goes with each of my
quilts.
        Hmph.  What do I do with my OWN quilts (the ones *I* made, not
my grandmother's ones, the ones *I* use, for *ME*)?  I put 'em in the
washer (with Orvus), through the whole cycle (I have cats, and they USE
these quilts, even as I do); and if I have time, I do the
sheet-on-the-lawn-in-the-shade thing.  That is very satisfying.  But
sometimes, I just gotta get the cat-hair off, and get the quilt back on
my bed (and maybe the puckers have flattened a bit  :-) ).
        So, I'm getting ready to duck, but I put *MY* quilts, the ones I
use for ME, in the washer, and in the dryer.
        No, I don't wash them every week, with the linens.
        And yes, I still "tromp" the OLD ones in the bathtub, with
Orvus, and put them on the lawn, in the shade, on a sheet.
        Does this make sense?
        Happy Trails,
        Sarah in Las Cruces, NM
 
 
 

First big quilt finished! (and one last question)

Post by PamBe » Tue, 30 Sep 1997 04:00:00



Quote:

>I've learned that I can machine quilt small pieces without any basting at
>all, just by iron the layers together, because the Cotton Classic will sort
>of bond with the fabric.  I guess it's the small amount of poly in the batt
>that melts.  Anyway, it's a great time saver if you're doing lots of small
>projects.

>BE sure to let us know what your next project is!

>Jeanne Joens


Thanks a million for this idea!  I am definitely sold on this batting,
too.  I pinned the heck out of my quilt, but as I was quilting along I felt
that all those pins were almost superfluous, as the batting was not budging
anyway.  Even when I trimmed off the excess batting and backing around the
edges, I had to take each backing piece (because I wanted to save the
excess backing strips) and literally peel off the batting, which had stuck
to it with no basting at all.  

My next project is going to be a string-square lap quilt for a friend's
mother who is a painter and who is going to swap me a watercolor for a
quilt.  That will be the first quilt I will have to part with, but at least
I am going to get something tangible in return to ease the pain.

Pam
Miami FL

 
 
 

First big quilt finished! (and one last question)

Post by J. Joen » Tue, 30 Sep 1997 04:00:00


Congratulations on finishing your quilt!  We all know what a milestone that
is.
I'm also a big fan of Cotton Classic.  It's inexpensive, I can just pick it
up when I'm at Wally World, It looks great after your wash it, and it
always drapes beautifully.  I should get a kickback from fairfield after my
machine quilting classes!
When I wash my quilts, I put them in the washer with cold water (or
lukewarm), and I use Cheer Free detergent.  I turn the washer off after it
fills, and wash the quilt by hand, smooshing it around in the washer.  Then
I spin the water out.  Fill and rinse the same way.  Sometimes I rinse
twice, if it's a large quilt.
Then I toss it in the dryer.  It crinkles up and looks like a lovely old
quilt.  I don't mean it crinkles a lot, just enough to make the surface
texture interesting and soft.

I've learned that I can machine quilt small pieces without any basting at
all, just by iron the layers together, because the Cotton Classic will sort
of bond with the fabric.  I guess it's the small amount of poly in the batt
that melts.  Anyway, it's a great time saver if you're doing lots of small
projects.

BE sure to let us know what your next project is!

Jeanne Joens

Quote:
> My quilt is 100% machine done, from piecing to binding.  It is a scrappy
> pastel LeMoyne Star with yellow print sashing and borders, and a very
> simple diagonal grid quilting pattern.  I got and used many good ideas
from
> this newsgroup, so thanks to you all for that.  One thing I want to share
> is the good experience I had with Fairfield Cotton Classic batting.  I
had
> never used this before, but chose it because it is thin and I thought
would
> be easier to roll up to shove under the machine.  It was easy to roll,
but
> was also very stable.  Even with all the wrestling, pulling and pushing
it
> got, I managed to quilt the whole thing with no puckers on front and only
> two on back.  The Cotton Classic really sticks to the fabric.  

> My one last question is about washing.  Another reason I bought this
> particular batting is because it is supposed to shrink "slightly," which
I
> want for the antiquey look.  However, how do I go about washing this
thing?
> I have a large capacity top load washer.  Will that do?  What cycle,
> detergent, dryer setting, etc.?  I guess I really have more than "one"
last
> question, after all.

> TIA,

> Pam
> Miami FL

 
 
 

First big quilt finished! (and one last question)

Post by Also Kim Fishe » Wed, 01 Oct 1997 04:00:00


Quote:


> > My one last question is about washing.  Another reason I bought this
> > particular batting is because it is supposed to shrink "slightly," which I
> > want for the antiquey look.  However, how do I go about washing this thing?
> > I have a large capacity top load washer.  Will that do?  What cycle,
> > detergent, dryer setting, etc.?  I guess I really have more than "one" last
> > question, after all.
Sarah writes:
>         Hmph.  What do I do with my OWN quilts (the ones *I* made, not
> my grandmother's ones, the ones *I* use, for *ME*)?  I put 'em in the
> washer (with Orvus), through the whole cycle (I have cats, and they ----

It may be of interest that some eight or nine years ago, I was visiting
my grandmother back East. Knowing I was interested in quilts, and
because there was a Truly Neat quilt on the bed in our room, she started
dragging out quilt after beautiful quilt. Her mother and grandmother,
had run a hotel in update New York, and all the beds needed covers! She
showed me at least half a dozen, of what she called her "Summer Quilts"
She let me pick my favorite, saying they were starting to show some
wear. Well, some of the patches had disintegrated, but even I could tell
these quilts were made around 1890s or earlier. (I fould out later, this
is a pretty accurate dating) The quilts, otherwise, were just fine. How
I gasped, way back then, to hear that as long as she had had the quilts,
she'd just throw 'em in the washer and the dryer. She'd had them as long
as she'd been married and I have to tell you, my Grandma is 93 years old
this year, that means she'd been washing them that way for over 50-60
years, and only a patch here or there of the oldest fabrics gone!
I took the quilt I liked the best, thinking I should repair it or donate
it to a museum or something, but in the end, I put it on my bed. I bet
my great-great-grandaunt or whoever it was that made it would be happy.

Go ahead and wash it.

Also Kim, who still has her venerable grandmother available to tell her
cool stuff like this.