Qs about shirt fabrics and long-arm quilting

Qs about shirt fabrics and long-arm quilting

Post by Edna Pear » Sun, 31 Jan 2010 05:05:40



As I start to cut into these shirts I've been asked to make memorial quilts
out of, I see that they are of very fine quality workmanship and fabrics.
Some are cotton, others linen, and some are a cotton-poly fabric.  Many are
heavy fabrics made of heavyweight thread and high thread counts.

The client and I chose the colors together while the shirts were wrapped in
plastic from the laundry, so we didn't make any judgments about fabric
weight, but now I have to.  (The client will be amenable to any decisions I
make about the "mechanics" of quiltmaking, so I'm not worried about her
reaction, as long as I keep her informed.)  I don't even know what to call
some of these fabric weaves.  Some of them are nearly as heavy as denim, and
I particularly like these prints and colors, plus I have to use at least
some of the medium- to heavy-weight shirt fabrics in order to include her
husband's company logo on the quilt front as she requested.  (I think that
this will look really special).  I think I'm going to have to reject any
lightweight summer shirts, and try to stick to medium to heavy weights.

I'm feeling anxious about how close in weight the four or five shirt fabrics
need to be, to be worked into six strips of Wild Goose Chase.  Then, I'm
anxious about what weight I need to use for background triangles and
sashing.

Am I correct in thinking (as I've read repeatedly) that if I use to much
variation in fabric weight, then the fabrics in the quilt top will tend to
pull at each other, distort, and/or wear unevenly with use?

Also, for any of you who do long-arm quilting, I assume I can't leave
buttons on?  Can a long-arm machine sew through the multiple layers of
fabric and foundation that would be involved in button plaquettes, pockets,
cuffs, collars, etc.?

The client insists that a few shirt buttons should be included on the quilt
top, and is amenable to paying me to take them off for the long-arm, then
sewing them back on after quilting.  She is also very enthusiastic about
using shirt details (button plaquettes, etc.) as highlights here and there
on the quilt top (and I think that would be lovely, especially for children
growing into ***hood with these memorial quilts).

The answers to these questions, and how the client feels about these
answers, will determine whether I can learn how to machine quilt on my SM
better than I already do, versus using a long-arm quilter.  (I will of
course be asking my local long-arm quilter the questions I'm asking above
when she's in her shop tomorrow, but I always get a lot of insight from
asking such questions at rctq.)

Whew!

tia,
ep

 
 
 

Qs about shirt fabrics and long-arm quilting

Post by Polly Esthe » Sun, 31 Jan 2010 07:13:28


Your project is fascinating, EP.  I like your choice of pattern - that's a
really good one for using 'big' pieces that can include your shirt details
and still have some small piecing to make it interesting.
    I'll stand aside and let your longarmer answer most of your questions -
but, naturally - I do have a suggestion.  I think you would benefit from
making a test; a placemat ought to do fine.  Obviously you have no shortage
of fabric.  By making a test of the pattern and the fabrics, you'll know
what will work and what will argue with you.  (Never met a lawyer that
didn't truly enjoy a good argument.)
    The problem I anticipate with using plackets will be that you wouldn't
want to have two different ones coming together at a seam.  One should be
fine.  Etc.   TEST  !
    I think I've said that before.  Keep us up to date.  I'm enjoying this.
Polly

"Edna Pearl" <

Quote:
> As I start to cut into these shirts I've been asked to make memorial
> quilts out of, I see that they are of very fine quality workmanship and
> fabrics. Some are cotton, others linen, and some are a cotton-poly fabric.
> Many are heavy fabrics made of heavyweight thread and high thread counts.

> The client and I chose the colors together while the shirts were wrapped
> in plastic from the laundry, so we didn't make any judgments about fabric
> weight, but now I have to.  (The client will be amenable to any decisions
> I make about the "mechanics" of quiltmaking, so I'm not worried about her
> reaction, as long as I keep her informed.)  I don't even know what to call
> some of these fabric weaves.  Some of them are nearly as heavy as denim,
> and I particularly like these prints and colors, plus I have to use at
> least some of the medium- to heavy-weight shirt fabrics in order to
> include her husband's company logo on the quilt front as she requested.
> (I think that this will look really special).  I think I'm going to have
> to reject any lightweight summer shirts, and try to stick to medium to
> heavy weights.

> I'm feeling anxious about how close in weight the four or five shirt
> fabrics need to be, to be worked into six strips of Wild Goose Chase.
> Then, I'm anxious about what weight I need to use for background triangles
> and sashing.

> Am I correct in thinking (as I've read repeatedly) that if I use to much
> variation in fabric weight, then the fabrics in the quilt top will tend to
> pull at each other, distort, and/or wear unevenly with use?

> Also, for any of you who do long-arm quilting, I assume I can't leave
> buttons on?  Can a long-arm machine sew through the multiple layers of
> fabric and foundation that would be involved in button plaquettes,
> pockets, cuffs, collars, etc.?

> The client insists that a few shirt buttons should be included on the
> quilt top, and is amenable to paying me to take them off for the long-arm,
> then sewing them back on after quilting.  She is also very enthusiastic
> about using shirt details (button plaquettes, etc.) as highlights here and
> there on the quilt top (and I think that would be lovely, especially for
> children growing into ***hood with these memorial quilts).

> The answers to these questions, and how the client feels about these
> answers, will determine whether I can learn how to machine quilt on my SM
> better than I already do, versus using a long-arm quilter.  (I will of
> course be asking my local long-arm quilter the questions I'm asking above
> when she's in her shop tomorrow, but I always get a lot of insight from
> asking such questions at rctq.)

> Whew!

> tia,
> ep


 
 
 

Qs about shirt fabrics and long-arm quilting

Post by Edna Pear » Sun, 31 Jan 2010 07:28:57


Thats an excellent suggestion about testing, Polly.  I'll make a couple of
mini-quilts, run them through my SM, wash the heck out of them with every
load of laundry I do for a week, and give them to the long-arm quilter if
she wants to test them.  It would be a nice memento for me of making these
quilts, too.

This is, indeed, an interesting project.  But I imagine that I'll be sick to
death of Wild Goose Chase by the time I get to the fourth or fifth quilt!


Quote:
> Your project is fascinating, EP.  I like your choice of pattern - that's a
> really good one for using 'big' pieces that can include your shirt details
> and still have some small piecing to make it interesting.
>    I'll stand aside and let your longarmer answer most of your questions -
> but, naturally - I do have a suggestion.  I think you would benefit from
> making a test; a placemat ought to do fine.  Obviously you have no
> shortage of fabric.  By making a test of the pattern and the fabrics,
> you'll know what will work and what will argue with you.  (Never met a
> lawyer that didn't truly enjoy a good argument.)
>    The problem I anticipate with using plackets will be that you wouldn't
> want to have two different ones coming together at a seam.  One should be
> fine.  Etc.   TEST  !
>    I think I've said that before.  Keep us up to date.  I'm enjoying this.
> Polly

> "Edna Pearl" <
>> As I start to cut into these shirts I've been asked to make memorial
>> quilts out of, I see that they are of very fine quality workmanship and
>> fabrics. Some are cotton, others linen, and some are a cotton-poly
>> fabric. Many are heavy fabrics made of heavyweight thread and high thread
>> counts.

>> The client and I chose the colors together while the shirts were wrapped
>> in plastic from the laundry, so we didn't make any judgments about fabric
>> weight, but now I have to.  (The client will be amenable to any decisions
>> I make about the "mechanics" of quiltmaking, so I'm not worried about her
>> reaction, as long as I keep her informed.)  I don't even know what to
>> call some of these fabric weaves.  Some of them are nearly as heavy as
>> denim, and I particularly like these prints and colors, plus I have to
>> use at least some of the medium- to heavy-weight shirt fabrics in order
>> to include her husband's company logo on the quilt front as she
>> requested. (I think that this will look really special).  I think I'm
>> going to have to reject any lightweight summer shirts, and try to stick
>> to medium to heavy weights.

>> I'm feeling anxious about how close in weight the four or five shirt
>> fabrics need to be, to be worked into six strips of Wild Goose Chase.
>> Then, I'm anxious about what weight I need to use for background
>> triangles and sashing.

>> Am I correct in thinking (as I've read repeatedly) that if I use to much
>> variation in fabric weight, then the fabrics in the quilt top will tend
>> to pull at each other, distort, and/or wear unevenly with use?

>> Also, for any of you who do long-arm quilting, I assume I can't leave
>> buttons on?  Can a long-arm machine sew through the multiple layers of
>> fabric and foundation that would be involved in button plaquettes,
>> pockets, cuffs, collars, etc.?

>> The client insists that a few shirt buttons should be included on the
>> quilt top, and is amenable to paying me to take them off for the
>> long-arm, then sewing them back on after quilting.  She is also very
>> enthusiastic about using shirt details (button plaquettes, etc.) as
>> highlights here and there on the quilt top (and I think that would be
>> lovely, especially for children growing into ***hood with these
>> memorial quilts).

>> The answers to these questions, and how the client feels about these
>> answers, will determine whether I can learn how to machine quilt on my SM
>> better than I already do, versus using a long-arm quilter.  (I will of
>> course be asking my local long-arm quilter the questions I'm asking above
>> when she's in her shop tomorrow, but I always get a lot of insight from
>> asking such questions at rctq.)

>> Whew!

>> tia,
>> ep

 
 
 

Qs about shirt fabrics and long-arm quilting

Post by Lelandit » Sun, 31 Jan 2010 12:25:35


would some type of iron on-fabric to the back of the light weight
t-shirts help?  Just a thought

Donna
in WA


Quote:
> As I start to cut into these shirts I've been asked to make memorial quilts
> out of, I see that they are of very fine quality workmanship and fabrics. Some
> are cotton, others linen, and some are a cotton-poly fabric.  Many are heavy
> fabrics made of heavyweight thread and high thread counts.

> The client and I chose the colors together while the shirts were wrapped in
> plastic from the laundry, so we didn't make any judgments about fabric weight,
> but now I have to.  (The client will be amenable to any decisions I make about
> the "mechanics" of quiltmaking, so I'm not worried about her reaction, as long
> as I keep her informed.)  I don't even know what to call some of these fabric
> weaves.  Some of them are nearly as heavy as denim, and I particularly like
> these prints and colors, plus I have to use at least some of the medium- to
> heavy-weight shirt fabrics in order to include her husband's company logo on
> the quilt front as she requested.  (I think that this will look really
> special).  I think I'm going to have to reject any lightweight summer shirts,
> and try to stick to medium to heavy weights.

> I'm feeling anxious about how close in weight the four or five shirt fabrics
> need to be, to be worked into six strips of Wild Goose Chase.  Then, I'm
> anxious about what weight I need to use for background triangles and sashing.

> Am I correct in thinking (as I've read repeatedly) that if I use to much
> variation in fabric weight, then the fabrics in the quilt top will tend to
> pull at each other, distort, and/or wear unevenly with use?

> Also, for any of you who do long-arm quilting, I assume I can't leave buttons
> on?  Can a long-arm machine sew through the multiple layers of fabric and
> foundation that would be involved in button plaquettes, pockets, cuffs,
> collars, etc.?

> The client insists that a few shirt buttons should be included on the quilt
> top, and is amenable to paying me to take them off for the long-arm, then
> sewing them back on after quilting.  She is also very enthusiastic about using
> shirt details (button plaquettes, etc.) as highlights here and there on the
> quilt top (and I think that would be lovely, especially for children growing
> into ***hood with these memorial quilts).

> The answers to these questions, and how the client feels about these answers,
> will determine whether I can learn how to machine quilt on my SM better than I
> already do, versus using a long-arm quilter.  (I will of course be asking my
> local long-arm quilter the questions I'm asking above when she's in her shop
> tomorrow, but I always get a lot of insight from asking such questions at
> rctq.)

> Whew!

> tia,
> ep

 
 
 

Qs about shirt fabrics and long-arm quilting

Post by Edna Pear » Sun, 31 Jan 2010 12:46:41



Quote:
> would some type of iron on-fabric to the back of the light weight
> t-shirts help?  Just a thought

That occurred to me, too, Donna -- to use a foundation.  I've read that this
helps lightweight fabrics wear better even if they aren't "competing" with
heavier fabrics, i.e., where all the patchwork is made of lightweight cloth.
It would be easy enough, but I'm billing by the hour and have a sense that
it would drive up the cost too much to suit the client.  I'll have a better
idea as I see how much time the cutting and piecing will take.

Thanks!
ep

 
 
 

Qs about shirt fabrics and long-arm quilting

Post by Robert » Sun, 31 Jan 2010 21:19:57


You mentioned before that the client wants heirlooms. So yes, IMO the
different weights will be a concern. Also, I would not mix natural
fibers with the poly-cottons, because they wear and fade Very
differently.

But IMO you can mix linens and cottons with no problem, assuming
everything has been washed and allowed to shrink as much as it's going
to. If you want to combine very lightweight with very heavy, just use
the lightweight fabric double. No need to fuse. Do some experimenting
and see what works. I would also line anything that's a very loose
weave. You might be able to find a very fine, thin cotton batiste that
would work well for this, especially since using a double layer of
printed or striped shirting might look unattractive. I use the batiste
to line cross stitch embroideries, because the fabric (e.g. aida) is
very loose weave and might allow batting to leak out.

You probably do need to remove buttons and save the longarmer some
grief. I'd take buttons off even for ordinary machine quilting.
Roberta in D

On Fri, 29 Jan 2010 14:05:40 -0600, "Edna Pearl"

Quote:

>As I start to cut into these shirts I've been asked to make memorial quilts
>out of, I see that they are of very fine quality workmanship and fabrics.
>Some are cotton, others linen, and some are a cotton-poly fabric.  Many are
>heavy fabrics made of heavyweight thread and high thread counts.

>The client and I chose the colors together while the shirts were wrapped in
>plastic from the laundry, so we didn't make any judgments about fabric
>weight, but now I have to.  (The client will be amenable to any decisions I
>make about the "mechanics" of quiltmaking, so I'm not worried about her
>reaction, as long as I keep her informed.)  I don't even know what to call
>some of these fabric weaves.  Some of them are nearly as heavy as denim, and
>I particularly like these prints and colors, plus I have to use at least
>some of the medium- to heavy-weight shirt fabrics in order to include her
>husband's company logo on the quilt front as she requested.  (I think that
>this will look really special).  I think I'm going to have to reject any
>lightweight summer shirts, and try to stick to medium to heavy weights.

>I'm feeling anxious about how close in weight the four or five shirt fabrics
>need to be, to be worked into six strips of Wild Goose Chase.  Then, I'm
>anxious about what weight I need to use for background triangles and
>sashing.

>Am I correct in thinking (as I've read repeatedly) that if I use to much
>variation in fabric weight, then the fabrics in the quilt top will tend to
>pull at each other, distort, and/or wear unevenly with use?

>Also, for any of you who do long-arm quilting, I assume I can't leave
>buttons on?  Can a long-arm machine sew through the multiple layers of
>fabric and foundation that would be involved in button plaquettes, pockets,
>cuffs, collars, etc.?

>The client insists that a few shirt buttons should be included on the quilt
>top, and is amenable to paying me to take them off for the long-arm, then
>sewing them back on after quilting.  She is also very enthusiastic about
>using shirt details (button plaquettes, etc.) as highlights here and there
>on the quilt top (and I think that would be lovely, especially for children
>growing into ***hood with these memorial quilts).

>The answers to these questions, and how the client feels about these
>answers, will determine whether I can learn how to machine quilt on my SM
>better than I already do, versus using a long-arm quilter.  (I will of
>course be asking my local long-arm quilter the questions I'm asking above
>when she's in her shop tomorrow, but I always get a lot of insight from
>asking such questions at rctq.)

>Whew!

>tia,
>ep

 
 
 

Qs about shirt fabrics and long-arm quilting

Post by Edna Pear » Mon, 01 Feb 2010 08:44:45


Thanks for all that good advice, Roberta.  The more I think about it, the
more I think it would be a simple matter to reinforce lightweight shirt
fabrics with muslin.

But I don't understand why it would matter whether " I mix natural

Quote:
> fibers with the poly-cottons, because they wear and fade Very
> differently. "

Is it an aesthetic consideration that one would stay brighter than the
other, or a practical one (of strength or distortion or whatever)?

Thanks again,
ep

But I'm not sure I under

Quote:
> You mentioned before that the client wants heirlooms. So yes, IMO the
> different weights will be a concern. Also, I would not mix natural
> fibers with the poly-cottons, because they wear and fade Very
> differently.

> But IMO you can mix linens and cottons with no problem, assuming
> everything has been washed and allowed to shrink as much as it's going
> to. If you want to combine very lightweight with very heavy, just use
> the lightweight fabric double. No need to fuse. Do some experimenting
> and see what works. I would also line anything that's a very loose
> weave. You might be able to find a very fine, thin cotton batiste that
> would work well for this, especially since using a double layer of
> printed or striped shirting might look unattractive. I use the batiste
> to line cross stitch embroideries, because the fabric (e.g. aida) is
> very loose weave and might allow batting to leak out.

> You probably do need to remove buttons and save the longarmer some
> grief. I'd take buttons off even for ordinary machine quilting.
> Roberta in D

> On Fri, 29 Jan 2010 14:05:40 -0600, "Edna Pearl"

>>As I start to cut into these shirts I've been asked to make memorial
>>quilts
>>out of, I see that they are of very fine quality workmanship and fabrics.
>>Some are cotton, others linen, and some are a cotton-poly fabric.  Many
>>are
>>heavy fabrics made of heavyweight thread and high thread counts.

>>The client and I chose the colors together while the shirts were wrapped
>>in
>>plastic from the laundry, so we didn't make any judgments about fabric
>>weight, but now I have to.  (The client will be amenable to any decisions
>>I
>>make about the "mechanics" of quiltmaking, so I'm not worried about her
>>reaction, as long as I keep her informed.)  I don't even know what to call
>>some of these fabric weaves.  Some of them are nearly as heavy as denim,
>>and
>>I particularly like these prints and colors, plus I have to use at least
>>some of the medium- to heavy-weight shirt fabrics in order to include her
>>husband's company logo on the quilt front as she requested.  (I think that
>>this will look really special).  I think I'm going to have to reject any
>>lightweight summer shirts, and try to stick to medium to heavy weights.

>>I'm feeling anxious about how close in weight the four or five shirt
>>fabrics
>>need to be, to be worked into six strips of Wild Goose Chase.  Then, I'm
>>anxious about what weight I need to use for background triangles and
>>sashing.

>>Am I correct in thinking (as I've read repeatedly) that if I use to much
>>variation in fabric weight, then the fabrics in the quilt top will tend to
>>pull at each other, distort, and/or wear unevenly with use?

>>Also, for any of you who do long-arm quilting, I assume I can't leave
>>buttons on?  Can a long-arm machine sew through the multiple layers of
>>fabric and foundation that would be involved in button plaquettes,
>>pockets,
>>cuffs, collars, etc.?

>>The client insists that a few shirt buttons should be included on the
>>quilt
>>top, and is amenable to paying me to take them off for the long-arm, then
>>sewing them back on after quilting.  She is also very enthusiastic about
>>using shirt details (button plaquettes, etc.) as highlights here and there
>>on the quilt top (and I think that would be lovely, especially for
>>children
>>growing into ***hood with these memorial quilts).

>>The answers to these questions, and how the client feels about these
>>answers, will determine whether I can learn how to machine quilt on my SM
>>better than I already do, versus using a long-arm quilter.  (I will of
>>course be asking my local long-arm quilter the questions I'm asking above
>>when she's in her shop tomorrow, but I always get a lot of insight from
>>asking such questions at rctq.)

>>Whew!

>>tia,
>>ep

 
 
 

Qs about shirt fabrics and long-arm quilting

Post by Edna Pear » Mon, 01 Feb 2010 08:49:07


If anybody's curious, the long-arm quilter said that she can quilt through
shirt features like plaquettes, cuffs, collars, etc., IF the batting is the
right one.

And yes, I will have to remove the buttons and re-attach them after the
quilting is done.

ep


Quote:
> As I start to cut into these shirts I've been asked to make memorial
> quilts out of, I see that they are of very fine quality workmanship and
> fabrics. Some are cotton, others linen, and some are a cotton-poly fabric.
> Many are heavy fabrics made of heavyweight thread and high thread counts.

> The client and I chose the colors together while the shirts were wrapped
> in plastic from the laundry, so we didn't make any judgments about fabric
> weight, but now I have to.  (The client will be amenable to any decisions
> I make about the "mechanics" of quiltmaking, so I'm not worried about her
> reaction, as long as I keep her informed.)  I don't even know what to call
> some of these fabric weaves.  Some of them are nearly as heavy as denim,
> and I particularly like these prints and colors, plus I have to use at
> least some of the medium- to heavy-weight shirt fabrics in order to
> include her husband's company logo on the quilt front as she requested.
> (I think that this will look really special).  I think I'm going to have
> to reject any lightweight summer shirts, and try to stick to medium to
> heavy weights.

> I'm feeling anxious about how close in weight the four or five shirt
> fabrics need to be, to be worked into six strips of Wild Goose Chase.
> Then, I'm anxious about what weight I need to use for background triangles
> and sashing.

> Am I correct in thinking (as I've read repeatedly) that if I use to much
> variation in fabric weight, then the fabrics in the quilt top will tend to
> pull at each other, distort, and/or wear unevenly with use?

> Also, for any of you who do long-arm quilting, I assume I can't leave
> buttons on?  Can a long-arm machine sew through the multiple layers of
> fabric and foundation that would be involved in button plaquettes,
> pockets, cuffs, collars, etc.?

> The client insists that a few shirt buttons should be included on the
> quilt top, and is amenable to paying me to take them off for the long-arm,
> then sewing them back on after quilting.  She is also very enthusiastic
> about using shirt details (button plaquettes, etc.) as highlights here and
> there on the quilt top (and I think that would be lovely, especially for
> children growing into ***hood with these memorial quilts).

> The answers to these questions, and how the client feels about these
> answers, will determine whether I can learn how to machine quilt on my SM
> better than I already do, versus using a long-arm quilter.  (I will of
> course be asking my local long-arm quilter the questions I'm asking above
> when she's in her shop tomorrow, but I always get a lot of insight from
> asking such questions at rctq.)

> Whew!

> tia,
> ep

 
 
 

Qs about shirt fabrics and long-arm quilting

Post by Robert » Mon, 01 Feb 2010 22:38:19


This may not matter with the shirts you plan to use. But back in the
dark ages when I first started, and was happy to find any sort of
medium weight fabric in the store that looked remotely like my
concept, I did that very thing. Mixed fibers. The poly-cotton was a
very pretty flower print on a blue background. (My tastes have
definitely changed, but back then, it looked good to me.) There was
some blue/white stripe in cotton, and some off-white cotton background
IIRC. It went on a DD's bed and looked sweet. What does stick very
clearly in my mind about this quilt was how badly the blue cotton
faded over the summer and a few launderings, while the poly remained
Bright. Also, the poly began growing fuzzies (we had no cotton batting
back then). And the block seams where poly was involved never did lie
flat. So that quilt didn't last long, it just looked too strange.
Fortunately the DD outgrew her little-girl bed. And I have avoided
using synthetic fibers ever since.
Roberta in D

On Sat, 30 Jan 2010 17:44:45 -0600, "Edna Pearl"

Quote:

>Thanks for all that good advice, Roberta.  The more I think about it, the
>more I think it would be a simple matter to reinforce lightweight shirt
>fabrics with muslin.

>But I don't understand why it would matter whether " I mix natural
>> fibers with the poly-cottons, because they wear and fade Very
>> differently. "

>Is it an aesthetic consideration that one would stay brighter than the
>other, or a practical one (of strength or distortion or whatever)?

>Thanks again,
>ep

>But I'm not sure I under


>> You mentioned before that the client wants heirlooms. So yes, IMO the
>> different weights will be a concern. Also, I would not mix natural
>> fibers with the poly-cottons, because they wear and fade Very
>> differently.

>> But IMO you can mix linens and cottons with no problem, assuming
>> everything has been washed and allowed to shrink as much as it's going
>> to. If you want to combine very lightweight with very heavy, just use
>> the lightweight fabric double. No need to fuse. Do some experimenting
>> and see what works. I would also line anything that's a very loose
>> weave. You might be able to find a very fine, thin cotton batiste that
>> would work well for this, especially since using a double layer of
>> printed or striped shirting might look unattractive. I use the batiste
>> to line cross stitch embroideries, because the fabric (e.g. aida) is
>> very loose weave and might allow batting to leak out.

>> You probably do need to remove buttons and save the longarmer some
>> grief. I'd take buttons off even for ordinary machine quilting.
>> Roberta in D

>> On Fri, 29 Jan 2010 14:05:40 -0600, "Edna Pearl"

>>>As I start to cut into these shirts I've been asked to make memorial
>>>quilts
>>>out of, I see that they are of very fine quality workmanship and fabrics.
>>>Some are cotton, others linen, and some are a cotton-poly fabric.  Many
>>>are
>>>heavy fabrics made of heavyweight thread and high thread counts.

>>>The client and I chose the colors together while the shirts were wrapped
>>>in
>>>plastic from the laundry, so we didn't make any judgments about fabric
>>>weight, but now I have to.  (The client will be amenable to any decisions
>>>I
>>>make about the "mechanics" of quiltmaking, so I'm not worried about her
>>>reaction, as long as I keep her informed.)  I don't even know what to call
>>>some of these fabric weaves.  Some of them are nearly as heavy as denim,
>>>and
>>>I particularly like these prints and colors, plus I have to use at least
>>>some of the medium- to heavy-weight shirt fabrics in order to include her
>>>husband's company logo on the quilt front as she requested.  (I think that
>>>this will look really special).  I think I'm going to have to reject any
>>>lightweight summer shirts, and try to stick to medium to heavy weights.

>>>I'm feeling anxious about how close in weight the four or five shirt
>>>fabrics
>>>need to be, to be worked into six strips of Wild Goose Chase.  Then, I'm
>>>anxious about what weight I need to use for background triangles and
>>>sashing.

>>>Am I correct in thinking (as I've read repeatedly) that if I use to much
>>>variation in fabric weight, then the fabrics in the quilt top will tend to
>>>pull at each other, distort, and/or wear unevenly with use?

>>>Also, for any of you who do long-arm quilting, I assume I can't leave
>>>buttons on?  Can a long-arm machine sew through the multiple layers of
>>>fabric and foundation that would be involved in button plaquettes,
>>>pockets,
>>>cuffs, collars, etc.?

>>>The client insists that a few shirt buttons should be included on the
>>>quilt
>>>top, and is amenable to paying me to take them off for the long-arm, then
>>>sewing them back on after quilting.  She is also very enthusiastic about
>>>using shirt details (button plaquettes, etc.) as highlights here and there
>>>on the quilt top (and I think that would be lovely, especially for
>>>children
>>>growing into ***hood with these memorial quilts).

>>>The answers to these questions, and how the client feels about these
>>>answers, will determine whether I can learn how to machine quilt on my SM
>>>better than I already do, versus using a long-arm quilter.  (I will of
>>>course be asking my local long-arm quilter the questions I'm asking above
>>>when she's in her shop tomorrow, but I always get a lot of insight from
>>>asking such questions at rctq.)

>>>Whew!

>>>tia,
>>>ep

 
 
 

Qs about shirt fabrics and long-arm quilting

Post by idahoqlt » Mon, 01 Feb 2010 23:40:08


I am enjoying this discussion with all of the tips because I am going
to make 3 small memento quilts this year from shirts of my son-in-
law's father.  I haven't even looked in the box of shirts yet, but I
have been considering patterns.  I am thinking I will do a different
pattern for each of the three and put a few photos in each top of the
father with the recipient of that quilt.

 
 
 

Qs about shirt fabrics and long-arm quilting

Post by Edna Pear » Tue, 02 Feb 2010 09:33:58


You've been very helpful, Roberta.  I think I'm stuck with at least some
poly-blend and some cotton.  I'm going to take Polly's suggestions and make
a couple of sample mini-quilts to experiment with combining the fabrics and
backing the lightweight ones with muslin.  Some shirts may just be
impossible, but I'd like some notice of which ones before I start the quilt
tops.

I feel even more confident based on the points you make that ditch quilting
would be a bad idea for these quilts.  A long-arm meander quilting and some
judicious muslin reinforcement during piecing may be my best hope of
harmonizing these diverse fabrics.

But I'm still taking suggestions!

ep
(Note to self:  Cutting triangles and squares from plaid and checked shirts
will drive you crazier than a rat in a coffee can after a couple of hours.
Take frequent breaks.)


Quote:
> This may not matter with the shirts you plan to use. But back in the
> dark ages when I first started, and was happy to find any sort of
> medium weight fabric in the store that looked remotely like my
> concept, I did that very thing. Mixed fibers. The poly-cotton was a
> very pretty flower print on a blue background. (My tastes have
> definitely changed, but back then, it looked good to me.) There was
> some blue/white stripe in cotton, and some off-white cotton background
> IIRC. It went on a DD's bed and looked sweet. What does stick very
> clearly in my mind about this quilt was how badly the blue cotton
> faded over the summer and a few launderings, while the poly remained
> Bright. Also, the poly began growing fuzzies (we had no cotton batting
> back then). And the block seams where poly was involved never did lie
> flat. So that quilt didn't last long, it just looked too strange.
> Fortunately the DD outgrew her little-girl bed. And I have avoided
> using synthetic fibers ever since.
> Roberta in D

> On Sat, 30 Jan 2010 17:44:45 -0600, "Edna Pearl"

>>Thanks for all that good advice, Roberta.  The more I think about it, the
>>more I think it would be a simple matter to reinforce lightweight shirt
>>fabrics with muslin.

>>But I don't understand why it would matter whether " I mix natural
>>> fibers with the poly-cottons, because they wear and fade Very
>>> differently. "

>>Is it an aesthetic consideration that one would stay brighter than the
>>other, or a practical one (of strength or distortion or whatever)?

>>Thanks again,
>>ep

>>But I'm not sure I under


>>> You mentioned before that the client wants heirlooms. So yes, IMO the
>>> different weights will be a concern. Also, I would not mix natural
>>> fibers with the poly-cottons, because they wear and fade Very
>>> differently.

>>> But IMO you can mix linens and cottons with no problem, assuming
>>> everything has been washed and allowed to shrink as much as it's going
>>> to. If you want to combine very lightweight with very heavy, just use
>>> the lightweight fabric double. No need to fuse. Do some experimenting
>>> and see what works. I would also line anything that's a very loose
>>> weave. You might be able to find a very fine, thin cotton batiste that
>>> would work well for this, especially since using a double layer of
>>> printed or striped shirting might look unattractive. I use the batiste
>>> to line cross stitch embroideries, because the fabric (e.g. aida) is
>>> very loose weave and might allow batting to leak out.

>>> You probably do need to remove buttons and save the longarmer some
>>> grief. I'd take buttons off even for ordinary machine quilting.
>>> Roberta in D

>>> On Fri, 29 Jan 2010 14:05:40 -0600, "Edna Pearl"

>>>>As I start to cut into these shirts I've been asked to make memorial
>>>>quilts
>>>>out of, I see that they are of very fine quality workmanship and
>>>>fabrics.
>>>>Some are cotton, others linen, and some are a cotton-poly fabric.  Many
>>>>are
>>>>heavy fabrics made of heavyweight thread and high thread counts.

>>>>The client and I chose the colors together while the shirts were wrapped
>>>>in
>>>>plastic from the laundry, so we didn't make any judgments about fabric
>>>>weight, but now I have to.  (The client will be amenable to any
>>>>decisions
>>>>I
>>>>make about the "mechanics" of quiltmaking, so I'm not worried about her
>>>>reaction, as long as I keep her informed.)  I don't even know what to
>>>>call
>>>>some of these fabric weaves.  Some of them are nearly as heavy as denim,
>>>>and
>>>>I particularly like these prints and colors, plus I have to use at least
>>>>some of the medium- to heavy-weight shirt fabrics in order to include
>>>>her
>>>>husband's company logo on the quilt front as she requested.  (I think
>>>>that
>>>>this will look really special).  I think I'm going to have to reject any
>>>>lightweight summer shirts, and try to stick to medium to heavy weights.

>>>>I'm feeling anxious about how close in weight the four or five shirt
>>>>fabrics
>>>>need to be, to be worked into six strips of Wild Goose Chase.  Then, I'm
>>>>anxious about what weight I need to use for background triangles and
>>>>sashing.

>>>>Am I correct in thinking (as I've read repeatedly) that if I use to much
>>>>variation in fabric weight, then the fabrics in the quilt top will tend
>>>>to
>>>>pull at each other, distort, and/or wear unevenly with use?

>>>>Also, for any of you who do long-arm quilting, I assume I can't leave
>>>>buttons on?  Can a long-arm machine sew through the multiple layers of
>>>>fabric and foundation that would be involved in button plaquettes,
>>>>pockets,
>>>>cuffs, collars, etc.?

>>>>The client insists that a few shirt buttons should be included on the
>>>>quilt
>>>>top, and is amenable to paying me to take them off for the long-arm,
>>>>then
>>>>sewing them back on after quilting.  She is also very enthusiastic about
>>>>using shirt details (button plaquettes, etc.) as highlights here and
>>>>there
>>>>on the quilt top (and I think that would be lovely, especially for
>>>>children
>>>>growing into ***hood with these memorial quilts).

>>>>The answers to these questions, and how the client feels about these
>>>>answers, will determine whether I can learn how to machine quilt on my
>>>>SM
>>>>better than I already do, versus using a long-arm quilter.  (I will of
>>>>course be asking my local long-arm quilter the questions I'm asking
>>>>above
>>>>when she's in her shop tomorrow, but I always get a lot of insight from
>>>>asking such questions at rctq.)

>>>>Whew!

>>>>tia,
>>>>ep

 
 
 

Qs about shirt fabrics and long-arm quilting

Post by Polly Esthe » Tue, 02 Feb 2010 10:20:48


( 'nuther note to self:  It is not required that your plaids and stripes be
cut perfectly lining up absolutely level and precisely.  Just a bit crooked
is quite charming.  I do it on purpose.)   Polly

"Edna Pearl" >!

Quote:

> ep
> (Note to self:  Cutting triangles and squares from plaid and checked
> shirts will drive you crazier than a rat in a coffee can after a couple of
> hours. Take frequent breaks.)



>> This may not matter with the shirts you plan to use. But back in the
>> dark ages when I first started, and was happy to find any sort of
>> medium weight fabric in the store that looked remotely like my
>> concept, I did that very thing. Mixed fibers. The poly-cotton was a
>> very pretty flower print on a blue background. (My tastes have
>> definitely changed, but back then, it looked good to me.) There was
>> some blue/white stripe in cotton, and some off-white cotton background
>> IIRC. It went on a DD's bed and looked sweet. What does stick very
>> clearly in my mind about this quilt was how badly the blue cotton
>> faded over the summer and a few launderings, while the poly remained
>> Bright. Also, the poly began growing fuzzies (we had no cotton batting
>> back then). And the block seams where poly was involved never did lie
>> flat. So that quilt didn't last long, it just looked too strange.
>> Fortunately the DD outgrew her little-girl bed. And I have avoided
>> using synthetic fibers ever since.
>> Roberta in D

>> On Sat, 30 Jan 2010 17:44:45 -0600, "Edna Pearl"

>>>Thanks for all that good advice, Roberta.  The more I think about it, the
>>>more I think it would be a simple matter to reinforce lightweight shirt
>>>fabrics with muslin.

>>>But I don't understand why it would matter whether " I mix natural
>>>> fibers with the poly-cottons, because they wear and fade Very
>>>> differently. "

>>>Is it an aesthetic consideration that one would stay brighter than the
>>>other, or a practical one (of strength or distortion or whatever)?

>>>Thanks again,
>>>ep

>>>But I'm not sure I under


>>>> You mentioned before that the client wants heirlooms. So yes, IMO the
>>>> different weights will be a concern. Also, I would not mix natural
>>>> fibers with the poly-cottons, because they wear and fade Very
>>>> differently.

>>>> But IMO you can mix linens and cottons with no problem, assuming
>>>> everything has been washed and allowed to shrink as much as it's going
>>>> to. If you want to combine very lightweight with very heavy, just use
>>>> the lightweight fabric double. No need to fuse. Do some experimenting
>>>> and see what works. I would also line anything that's a very loose
>>>> weave. You might be able to find a very fine, thin cotton batiste that
>>>> would work well for this, especially since using a double layer of
>>>> printed or striped shirting might look unattractive. I use the batiste
>>>> to line cross stitch embroideries, because the fabric (e.g. aida) is
>>>> very loose weave and might allow batting to leak out.

>>>> You probably do need to remove buttons and save the longarmer some
>>>> grief. I'd take buttons off even for ordinary machine quilting.
>>>> Roberta in D

>>>> On Fri, 29 Jan 2010 14:05:40 -0600, "Edna Pearl"

>>>>>As I start to cut into these shirts I've been asked to make memorial
>>>>>quilts
>>>>>out of, I see that they are of very fine quality workmanship and
>>>>>fabrics.
>>>>>Some are cotton, others linen, and some are a cotton-poly fabric.  Many
>>>>>are
>>>>>heavy fabrics made of heavyweight thread and high thread counts.

>>>>>The client and I chose the colors together while the shirts were
>>>>>wrapped
>>>>>in
>>>>>plastic from the laundry, so we didn't make any judgments about fabric
>>>>>weight, but now I have to.  (The client will be amenable to any
>>>>>decisions
>>>>>I
>>>>>make about the "mechanics" of quiltmaking, so I'm not worried about her
>>>>>reaction, as long as I keep her informed.)  I don't even know what to
>>>>>call
>>>>>some of these fabric weaves.  Some of them are nearly as heavy as
>>>>>denim,
>>>>>and
>>>>>I particularly like these prints and colors, plus I have to use at
>>>>>least
>>>>>some of the medium- to heavy-weight shirt fabrics in order to include
>>>>>her
>>>>>husband's company logo on the quilt front as she requested.  (I think
>>>>>that
>>>>>this will look really special).  I think I'm going to have to reject
>>>>>any
>>>>>lightweight summer shirts, and try to stick to medium to heavy weights.

>>>>>I'm feeling anxious about how close in weight the four or five shirt
>>>>>fabrics
>>>>>need to be, to be worked into six strips of Wild Goose Chase.  Then,
>>>>>I'm
>>>>>anxious about what weight I need to use for background triangles and
>>>>>sashing.

>>>>>Am I correct in thinking (as I've read repeatedly) that if I use to
>>>>>much
>>>>>variation in fabric weight, then the fabrics in the quilt top will tend
>>>>>to
>>>>>pull at each other, distort, and/or wear unevenly with use?

>>>>>Also, for any of you who do long-arm quilting, I assume I can't leave
>>>>>buttons on?  Can a long-arm machine sew through the multiple layers of
>>>>>fabric and foundation that would be involved in button plaquettes,
>>>>>pockets,
>>>>>cuffs, collars, etc.?

>>>>>The client insists that a few shirt buttons should be included on the
>>>>>quilt
>>>>>top, and is amenable to paying me to take them off for the long-arm,
>>>>>then
>>>>>sewing them back on after quilting.  She is also very enthusiastic
>>>>>about
>>>>>using shirt details (button plaquettes, etc.) as highlights here and
>>>>>there
>>>>>on the quilt top (and I think that would be lovely, especially for
>>>>>children
>>>>>growing into ***hood with these memorial quilts).

>>>>>The answers to these questions, and how the client feels about these
>>>>>answers, will determine whether I can learn how to machine quilt on my
>>>>>SM
>>>>>better than I already do, versus using a long-arm quilter.  (I will of
>>>>>course be asking my local long-arm quilter the questions I'm asking
>>>>>above
>>>>>when she's in her shop tomorrow, but I always get a lot of insight from
>>>>>asking such questions at rctq.)

>>>>>Whew!

>>>>>tia,
>>>>>ep

 
 
 

Qs about shirt fabrics and long-arm quilting

Post by Tari » Tue, 02 Feb 2010 13:05:13


Yep, sure Polly, we all do that on purpose!  ; )
Taria

Quote:
>( 'nuther note to self:  It is not required that your plaids and stripes be
>cut perfectly lining up absolutely level and precisely.  Just a bit crooked
>is quite charming.  I do it on purpose.)   Polly

> "Edna Pearl" >!

>> ep
>> (Note to self:  Cutting triangles and squares from plaid and checked
>> shirts will drive you crazier than a rat in a coffee can after a couple
>> of hours. Take frequent breaks.)



>>> This may not matter with the shirts you plan to use. But back in the
>>> dark ages when I first started, and was happy to find any sort of
>>> medium weight fabric in the store that looked remotely like my
>>> concept, I did that very thing. Mixed fibers. The poly-cotton was a
>>> very pretty flower print on a blue background. (My tastes have
>>> definitely changed, but back then, it looked good to me.) There was
>>> some blue/white stripe in cotton, and some off-white cotton background
>>> IIRC. It went on a DD's bed and looked sweet. What does stick very
>>> clearly in my mind about this quilt was how badly the blue cotton
>>> faded over the summer and a few launderings, while the poly remained
>>> Bright. Also, the poly began growing fuzzies (we had no cotton batting
>>> back then). And the block seams where poly was involved never did lie
>>> flat. So that quilt didn't last long, it just looked too strange.
>>> Fortunately the DD outgrew her little-girl bed. And I have avoided
>>> using synthetic fibers ever since.
>>> Roberta in D

>>> On Sat, 30 Jan 2010 17:44:45 -0600, "Edna Pearl"

>>>>Thanks for all that good advice, Roberta.  The more I think about it,
>>>>the
>>>>more I think it would be a simple matter to reinforce lightweight shirt
>>>>fabrics with muslin.

>>>>But I don't understand why it would matter whether " I mix natural
>>>>> fibers with the poly-cottons, because they wear and fade Very
>>>>> differently. "

>>>>Is it an aesthetic consideration that one would stay brighter than the
>>>>other, or a practical one (of strength or distortion or whatever)?

>>>>Thanks again,
>>>>ep

>>>>But I'm not sure I under


>>>>> You mentioned before that the client wants heirlooms. So yes, IMO the
>>>>> different weights will be a concern. Also, I would not mix natural
>>>>> fibers with the poly-cottons, because they wear and fade Very
>>>>> differently.

>>>>> But IMO you can mix linens and cottons with no problem, assuming
>>>>> everything has been washed and allowed to shrink as much as it's going
>>>>> to. If you want to combine very lightweight with very heavy, just use
>>>>> the lightweight fabric double. No need to fuse. Do some experimenting
>>>>> and see what works. I would also line anything that's a very loose
>>>>> weave. You might be able to find a very fine, thin cotton batiste that
>>>>> would work well for this, especially since using a double layer of
>>>>> printed or striped shirting might look unattractive. I use the batiste
>>>>> to line cross stitch embroideries, because the fabric (e.g. aida) is
>>>>> very loose weave and might allow batting to leak out.

>>>>> You probably do need to remove buttons and save the longarmer some
>>>>> grief. I'd take buttons off even for ordinary machine quilting.
>>>>> Roberta in D

>>>>> On Fri, 29 Jan 2010 14:05:40 -0600, "Edna Pearl"

>>>>>>As I start to cut into these shirts I've been asked to make memorial
>>>>>>quilts
>>>>>>out of, I see that they are of very fine quality workmanship and
>>>>>>fabrics.
>>>>>>Some are cotton, others linen, and some are a cotton-poly fabric.
>>>>>>Many
>>>>>>are
>>>>>>heavy fabrics made of heavyweight thread and high thread counts.

>>>>>>The client and I chose the colors together while the shirts were
>>>>>>wrapped
>>>>>>in
>>>>>>plastic from the laundry, so we didn't make any judgments about fabric
>>>>>>weight, but now I have to.  (The client will be amenable to any
>>>>>>decisions
>>>>>>I
>>>>>>make about the "mechanics" of quiltmaking, so I'm not worried about
>>>>>>her
>>>>>>reaction, as long as I keep her informed.)  I don't even know what to
>>>>>>call
>>>>>>some of these fabric weaves.  Some of them are nearly as heavy as
>>>>>>denim,
>>>>>>and
>>>>>>I particularly like these prints and colors, plus I have to use at
>>>>>>least
>>>>>>some of the medium- to heavy-weight shirt fabrics in order to include
>>>>>>her
>>>>>>husband's company logo on the quilt front as she requested.  (I think
>>>>>>that
>>>>>>this will look really special).  I think I'm going to have to reject
>>>>>>any
>>>>>>lightweight summer shirts, and try to stick to medium to heavy
>>>>>>weights.

>>>>>>I'm feeling anxious about how close in weight the four or five shirt
>>>>>>fabrics
>>>>>>need to be, to be worked into six strips of Wild Goose Chase.  Then,
>>>>>>I'm
>>>>>>anxious about what weight I need to use for background triangles and
>>>>>>sashing.

>>>>>>Am I correct in thinking (as I've read repeatedly) that if I use to
>>>>>>much
>>>>>>variation in fabric weight, then the fabrics in the quilt top will
>>>>>>tend to
>>>>>>pull at each other, distort, and/or wear unevenly with use?

>>>>>>Also, for any of you who do long-arm quilting, I assume I can't leave
>>>>>>buttons on?  Can a long-arm machine sew through the multiple layers of
>>>>>>fabric and foundation that would be involved in button plaquettes,
>>>>>>pockets,
>>>>>>cuffs, collars, etc.?

>>>>>>The client insists that a few shirt buttons should be included on the
>>>>>>quilt
>>>>>>top, and is amenable to paying me to take them off for the long-arm,
>>>>>>then
>>>>>>sewing them back on after quilting.  She is also very enthusiastic
>>>>>>about
>>>>>>using shirt details (button plaquettes, etc.) as highlights here and
>>>>>>there
>>>>>>on the quilt top (and I think that would be lovely, especially for
>>>>>>children
>>>>>>growing into ***hood with these memorial quilts).

>>>>>>The answers to these questions, and how the client feels about these
>>>>>>answers, will determine whether I can learn how to machine quilt on my
>>>>>>SM
>>>>>>better than I already do, versus using a long-arm quilter.  (I will of
>>>>>>course be asking my local long-arm quilter the questions I'm asking
>>>>>>above
>>>>>>when she's in her shop tomorrow, but I always get a lot of insight
>>>>>>from
>>>>>>asking such questions at rctq.)

>>>>>>Whew!

>>>>>>tia,
>>>>>>ep

 
 
 

Qs about shirt fabrics and long-arm quilting

Post by Polly Esthe » Tue, 02 Feb 2010 13:31:26


I confess.  I'm quite insane about matching.  When I made sister that apron,
I made certain that the print on the pockets was so perfect that they
absolutely disappeared.  =)  The dressmaker in me insisted - but - when I'm
cutting plaids and stripes for quilts I force me to wonk just a bit.  I do
have to put the cage cover over my dressmaker side so she'll hush.  Polly

"Taria" <> Yep, sure Polly, we all do that on purpose!  ; )

Quote:
> Taria
> "Polly Esther" <>>( 'nuther note to self:  It is not required that your
> plaids and stripes be
>>cut perfectly lining up absolutely level and precisely.  Just a bit
>>crooked is quite charming.  I do it on purpose.)   Polly

>> "Edna Pearl" >!

>>> ep
>>> (Note to self:  Cutting triangles and squares from plaid and checked
>>> shirts will drive you crazier than a rat in a coffee can after a couple
>>> of hours. Take frequent breaks.)

 
 
 

Qs about shirt fabrics and long-arm quilting

Post by Sandy » Tue, 02 Feb 2010 14:13:58


Howdy!

Mixing types of fabrics... there's a practical difference,
as well as "this is what I like".   Sometimes poly fabrics get shiny
after several washings.

Adequate (more) quilting often helps smooth out the surface
and stabilize the fabrics when those fabrics are of differing weights.
W/ some areas of the quilts thicker than others, more quilting (rather
than "minimal") will help equalize things.

Good luck!

R/Sandy


Quote:

> Thanks for all that good advice, Roberta.  The more I think about it, the
> more I think it would be a simple matter to reinforce lightweight shirt
> fabrics with muslin.

> But I don't understand why it would matter whether " I mix natural
>> fibers with the poly-cottons, because they wear and fade Very
>> differently. "

> Is it an aesthetic consideration that one would stay brighter than the
> other, or a practical one (of strength or distortion or whatever)?

> Thanks again,
> ep