OT: "I'm just a mother? Excuse me??" - Long, but so good

OT: "I'm just a mother? Excuse me??" - Long, but so good

Post by CNYstitche » Thu, 08 Apr 2004 21:52:26



My dear stepmother sent this to me a while ago,  and I have been
searching for it so that i could share:

A few months ago, when I was picking up the children at school, a mother
I knew well rushed up to me.  Emily was fuming with indignation.  "Do
you know what you and I are?" she demanded.  Before I could answer (and
I didn't really have one handy) she blurted out the reason for her question.

It seemed she had just returned from renewing her driver's license at
the County Clerk's office.  Asked by the woman to state her occupation,
Emily had hesitated, uncertain how to classify herself.  "What I mean
is," explained the recorder, "do you have a job, or are you just a....?"
  "Of course I have a job," snapped Emily.  "I'm a mother."  "We don't
list 'mother' as an occupation...'housewife" covers it," said the
recorder emphatically.

I forgot all about her story until one day I found myself in the same
situation, this time at our own town hall.  The clerk was obviously a
career woman, poised, efficient, and possessed of a high-sounding title
like "Town Registrat" or "Official Interogator."

"And what is your occupation?" she probed.  What made me say it, I do
not know.  The words simply popped out.  "I'm a Research Associate in
the field of Child Development and Human Relations."  The clerk paused,
ball-point pen frozen in midair, and looked up as though she had not
heard right.  I repeated the title slowly, emphasizing the most
signifigant words.  Then I stared with wonder as my pompous announcement
was written in blod black ink on the official questionnaire.

"Might I ask," said the clerk with new interest, "just what you do in
your field?"

Cooly, without any trace of fluster in my voice, I heard myself reply,
"I have a continuing program of research (what mother doesn't) in the
laboratory and in the field (normally I would have said indoors and
out).  I', working for my Masters (the whole darned family) and already
have four credits (all daughters).  Of course, the job is one of the
most demanding in the humanities (any mother care to disagree?) and I
often work 14 hours a day (24 is more like it).  But, the job is more
challenging than most run-of-the-mill careers and the rewards are in
satisfaction rather than just money."

There was an increasing note of respect in the clerk's voice as she
completed the form, stood up, and personally ushered me to the door.

As I drove into our driveway, buoyed up by my glamorous new career, I
was greeted by my lab assistants - ages 13, 7, and 3.  Upstairs, I could
hear our new experimental model (6 months) in the child-development
program, testing out a new vocal pattern.  I felt triumphant!  I had
scored a beat on bureaucracy!  And I had gone on the official records as
someone more distinguished and indispensible to mankind than "just
another mother."

Motherhood....what a glorious career.  Especially when there's a title
on the door!!

The images of Mother:
4 years - My mommy can do anything!
8 years - My mom knows a lot!  A whole lot!
12 years - My mother doesn't really know quite everything.
14 years - Naturally, MOther doesn't know that, either
16 years - Mother?  SHe's hopelessly old-fashioned
18 years - That old woman?  She''s way out of date!
25 years - Well, she might know a little bit about it
35 years - Before we decide, let's get MOm's opinion.
45 years - Wonder what MOm would have thought about it?
65 years - Wish I could talk it over with MOm.

 
 
 

OT: "I'm just a mother? Excuse me??" - Long, but so good

Post by Smee » Fri, 09 Apr 2004 05:56:10



Quote:
> My dear stepmother sent this to me a while ago,  and I have been
> searching for it so that i could share:

> A few months ago, when I was picking up the children at school, a mother
> I knew well rushed up to me.  Emily was fuming with indignation.  "Do
> you know what you and I are?" she demanded.  Before I could answer (and
> I didn't really have one handy) she blurted out the reason for her
question.

> It seemed she had just returned from renewing her driver's license at
> the County Clerk's office.  Asked by the woman to state her occupation,
> Emily had hesitated, uncertain how to classify herself.  "What I mean
> is," explained the recorder, "do you have a job, or are you just a....?"
>   "Of course I have a job," snapped Emily.  "I'm a mother."  "We don't
> list 'mother' as an occupation...'housewife" covers it," said the
> recorder emphatically.

> I forgot all about her story until one day I found myself in the same
> situation, this time at our own town hall.  The clerk was obviously a
> career woman, poised, efficient, and possessed of a high-sounding title
> like "Town Registrat" or "Official Interogator."

> "And what is your occupation?" she probed.  What made me say it, I do
> not know.  The words simply popped out.  "I'm a Research Associate in
> the field of Child Development and Human Relations."  The clerk paused,
> ball-point pen frozen in midair, and looked up as though she had not
> heard right.  I repeated the title slowly, emphasizing the most
> signifigant words.  Then I stared with wonder as my pompous announcement
> was written in blod black ink on the official questionnaire.

> "Might I ask," said the clerk with new interest, "just what you do in
> your field?"

> Cooly, without any trace of fluster in my voice, I heard myself reply,
> "I have a continuing program of research (what mother doesn't) in the
> laboratory and in the field (normally I would have said indoors and
> out).  I', working for my Masters (the whole darned family) and already
> have four credits (all daughters).  Of course, the job is one of the
> most demanding in the humanities (any mother care to disagree?) and I
> often work 14 hours a day (24 is more like it).  But, the job is more
> challenging than most run-of-the-mill careers and the rewards are in
> satisfaction rather than just money."

> There was an increasing note of respect in the clerk's voice as she
> completed the form, stood up, and personally ushered me to the door.

> As I drove into our driveway, buoyed up by my glamorous new career, I
> was greeted by my lab assistants - ages 13, 7, and 3.  Upstairs, I could
> hear our new experimental model (6 months) in the child-development
> program, testing out a new vocal pattern.  I felt triumphant!  I had
> scored a beat on bureaucracy!  And I had gone on the official records as
> someone more distinguished and indispensible to mankind than "just
> another mother."

> Motherhood....what a glorious career.  Especially when there's a title
> on the door!!

> The images of Mother:
> 4 years - My mommy can do anything!
> 8 years - My mom knows a lot!  A whole lot!
> 12 years - My mother doesn't really know quite everything.
> 14 years - Naturally, MOther doesn't know that, either
> 16 years - Mother?  SHe's hopelessly old-fashioned
> 18 years - That old woman?  She''s way out of date!
> 25 years - Well, she might know a little bit about it
> 35 years - Before we decide, let's get MOm's opinion.
> 45 years - Wonder what MOm would have thought about it?
> 65 years - Wish I could talk it over with MOm.

I heard an answer the that "just a housewife" jab years ago. The woman
replied that she was a home maker, she wasn't married to the house!

Smee, retired researcher

 
 
 

OT: "I'm just a mother? Excuse me??" - Long, but so good

Post by Polly Esthe » Fri, 09 Apr 2004 11:12:46


Back before I became a happy deadbeat, one of my random jobs was to empanel
juries. If there was no answer to occupation from one of the ladies, we were
well-warned to ask, "Do you work outside the home?"  No need to lose
perfectly good jury clerks because of a stupid form.  Polly


Quote:



> > My dear stepmother sent this to me a while ago,  and I have been
> > searching for it so that i could share:

> > A few months ago, when I was picking up the children at school, a mother
> > I knew well rushed up to me.  Emily was fuming with indignation.  "Do
> > you know what you and I are?" she demanded.  Before I could answer (and
> > I didn't really have one handy) she blurted out the reason for her
> question.

> > It seemed she had just returned from renewing her driver's license at
> > the County Clerk's office.  Asked by the woman to state her occupation,
> > Emily had hesitated, uncertain how to classify herself.  "What I mean
> > is," explained the recorder, "do you have a job, or are you just a....?"
> >   "Of course I have a job," snapped Emily.  "I'm a mother."  "We don't
> > list 'mother' as an occupation...'housewife" covers it," said the
> > recorder emphatically.

> > I forgot all about her story until one day I found myself in the same
> > situation, this time at our own town hall.  The clerk was obviously a
> > career woman, poised, efficient, and possessed of a high-sounding title
> > like "Town Registrat" or "Official Interogator."

> > "And what is your occupation?" she probed.  What made me say it, I do
> > not know.  The words simply popped out.  "I'm a Research Associate in
> > the field of Child Development and Human Relations."  The clerk paused,
> > ball-point pen frozen in midair, and looked up as though she had not
> > heard right.  I repeated the title slowly, emphasizing the most
> > signifigant words.  Then I stared with wonder as my pompous announcement
> > was written in blod black ink on the official questionnaire.

> > "Might I ask," said the clerk with new interest, "just what you do in
> > your field?"

> > Cooly, without any trace of fluster in my voice, I heard myself reply,
> > "I have a continuing program of research (what mother doesn't) in the
> > laboratory and in the field (normally I would have said indoors and
> > out).  I', working for my Masters (the whole darned family) and already
> > have four credits (all daughters).  Of course, the job is one of the
> > most demanding in the humanities (any mother care to disagree?) and I
> > often work 14 hours a day (24 is more like it).  But, the job is more
> > challenging than most run-of-the-mill careers and the rewards are in
> > satisfaction rather than just money."

> > There was an increasing note of respect in the clerk's voice as she
> > completed the form, stood up, and personally ushered me to the door.

> > As I drove into our driveway, buoyed up by my glamorous new career, I
> > was greeted by my lab assistants - ages 13, 7, and 3.  Upstairs, I could
> > hear our new experimental model (6 months) in the child-development
> > program, testing out a new vocal pattern.  I felt triumphant!  I had
> > scored a beat on bureaucracy!  And I had gone on the official records as
> > someone more distinguished and indispensible to mankind than "just
> > another mother."

> > Motherhood....what a glorious career.  Especially when there's a title
> > on the door!!

> > The images of Mother:
> > 4 years - My mommy can do anything!
> > 8 years - My mom knows a lot!  A whole lot!
> > 12 years - My mother doesn't really know quite everything.
> > 14 years - Naturally, MOther doesn't know that, either
> > 16 years - Mother?  SHe's hopelessly old-fashioned
> > 18 years - That old woman?  She''s way out of date!
> > 25 years - Well, she might know a little bit about it
> > 35 years - Before we decide, let's get MOm's opinion.
> > 45 years - Wonder what MOm would have thought about it?
> > 65 years - Wish I could talk it over with MOm.

> I heard an answer the that "just a housewife" jab years ago. The woman
> replied that she was a home maker, she wasn't married to the house!

> Smee, retired researcher

 
 
 

OT: "I'm just a mother? Excuse me??" - Long, but so good

Post by Paul & Suzie Beckwi » Sat, 10 Apr 2004 03:09:14


Oh thats good!

Suzie B
--
"From the internet connection under the pier"
Southend, UK
--
Please remove NOSPAM when emailing me!
http://community.webshots.com/user/suziekga

 
 
 

OT: "I'm just a mother? Excuse me??" - Long, but so good

Post by Mel Rimme » Sat, 10 Apr 2004 06:16:05




Quote:
>Back before I became a happy deadbeat, one of my random jobs was to empanel
>juries. If there was no answer to occupation from one of the ladies, we were
>well-warned to ask, "Do you work outside the home?"  No need to lose
>perfectly good jury clerks because of a stupid form.  Polly

I'd still be inclined to answer "Yes, I work outside the home. I take
the kids to school and bring them back, and once a week I do the grocery
shopping." But I'm just awkward.
--
Mel Rimmer
 
 
 

OT: "I'm just a mother? Excuse me??" - Long, but so good

Post by Kate Dice » Sat, 10 Apr 2004 10:24:32


Quote:



> >Back before I became a happy deadbeat, one of my random jobs was to empanel
> >juries. If there was no answer to occupation from one of the ladies, we were
> >well-warned to ask, "Do you work outside the home?"  No need to lose
> >perfectly good jury clerks because of a stupid form.  Polly

> I'd still be inclined to answer "Yes, I work outside the home. I take
> the kids to school and bring them back, and once a week I do the grocery
> shopping." But I'm just awkward.
> --
> Mel Rimmer

When I was in the hospital last June, there was a lass in the opposite
bed who answered, Yes, I'm a mother, when asked if she worked.  We all
felt this was a very good answer.
--
Kate  XXXXXX
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe *** of the Chocolate Buttons
http://www.FoundCollection.com/
Click on Kate's Pages and explore!
 
 
 

OT: "I'm just a mother? Excuse me??" - Long, but so good

Post by Diana Curti » Mon, 12 Apr 2004 04:07:33


I remember a story bout a man who was asked what his SAHM did, now that the
kids were grown. His reply was, while I make the living, she make living
worth while.
Diana, who reminds us that we are human "beings', not human 'doings'
ps Terri, thats a *great* response!!!!


Quote:


> > When I was in the hospital last June, there was a lass in the opposite
> > bed who answered, Yes, I'm a mother, when asked if she worked.  We all
> > felt this was a very good answer.

> From another perspective:

> When he's home, people ask me the same thing. "What does he do?"

> Since the answer would require a months worth of answers such as
> car/tractor repair,gardening,lawn care,building,carpentry,cement
> and metal work,budget balancing,web design and computer maintenence,
> in *addition* to the usual household chores traditionally
> held by female home-makers, my answer has become a bit more succinct.

> When people ask me now, "What does he do?"
> I answer:

> "He works his tail off".

> Terri

 
 
 

OT: "I'm just a mother? Excuse me??" - Long, but so good

Post by Johanna Gibso » Mon, 12 Apr 2004 04:54:01


On Sat, 10 Apr 2004 14:07:33 -0500, "Diana Curtis"

Quote:

>I remember a story bout a man who was asked what his SAHM did, now that the
>kids were grown. His reply was, while I make the living, she make living
>worth while.
>Diana, who reminds us that we are human "beings', not human 'doings'
>ps Terri, thats a *great* response!!!!

        As an ex-pat living in the UK for nearly 9 years with no plans on
moving back to the US, I am quite tired of being asked, "Do you ever
get home?"  Well I heard a great response on BBC Radio 4 today, by a
Northern Irish man who is fed up of being asked the same question now
that he lives in London:  "Yes, every night!"  I just love that,
because when I say that I live on Blackness Avenue (a mile from my
work) they don't seem to believe me, and want to dig deeper to get to
the TRUTH, i.e What *are* you doing here?!?  Trouble is, I get tired
of going through this 50 times every time I go into work.  Never mind,
I'm ready now.  :)

-- Jo in Scotland

 
 
 

OT: "I'm just a mother? Excuse me??" - Long, but so good

Post by Joanne Passmor » Sun, 18 Apr 2004 10:58:44


I thought some readers might be interested in the story behind my 1950
Singer sm. My mom paid $244. (CDN) in 1950 for it... $130. down payment with
12 remaining payments of $10.40 (to include interest) AND she had to get 6
co-signers on the payments! Four had to be relatives and two local
references. I used this SM from 18 years old to 45 yrs. old at which point I
bought a Huzsvarna for $1200. Three equal payments and no co-signers:)
 
 
 

OT: "I'm just a mother? Excuse me??" - Long, but so good

Post by WoodenSpool » Sun, 18 Apr 2004 16:02:27


I'm glad you posted this; I've said many a time that the purchase of a
Singer sewing machine in that time period was a major family expense, and
this story bears this out.
Thanks for sharing,
Vintage Singer collector Buckeye Bev


Quote:
> I thought some readers might be interested in the story behind my 1950
> Singer sm. My mom paid $244. (CDN) in 1950 for it... $130. down payment
with
> 12 remaining payments of $10.40 (to include interest) AND she had to get 6
> co-signers on the payments! Four had to be relatives and two local
> references. I used this SM from 18 years old to 45 yrs. old at which point
I
> bought a Huzsvarna for $1200. Three equal payments and no co-signers:)