Grandmother's flower garden

Grandmother's flower garden

Post by Sarah Latha » Sun, 01 Nov 1998 04:00:00



I have always manted to make a patchwork quilt. Is this Grandmother's
flower garden a suitable project for a beginner? Suggestions please.
 
 
 

Grandmother's flower garden

Post by KatQuil » Sun, 01 Nov 1998 04:00:00


Quote:
> Is this Grandmother's
>flower garden a suitable project for a beginner? Suggestions please.

The answer to this question would depend on the kind of person you are.

The GFG is a wonderful pattern to work with because it is beautiful, is easy to
learn, is relaxing hand work, and is very portable.  It is NOT, however,
something you should undertake if you are looking for instant gratification.
There are many pieces to cut, paper tempates to cut and hand sewing to do.  One
block will take a day to do.  

You might consider having another project going on at the same time, perhaps
some machine work, so you will feel like you are accomplishing something.  The
GFG can be worked on in "found moments" like waiting in a Dr.'s office, talking
on the phone, watching TV in the evening, or on a car trip...provided you are
not the driver...<VGB>.

Go for it.....this is a very rewarding pattern to work with.

Kathy in Holbrook, NY.......who actually had a DATE last night...   8-)

 
 
 

Grandmother's flower garden

Post by Deb » Sun, 01 Nov 1998 04:00:00


Hubba bubba, Ms. Kathy!! How was he....er, I mean it, yeah, the date? :-D
--
Deb
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Flats/4237/

KatQuilts wrote ......

Quote:

> Kathy in Holbrook, NY.......who actually had a DATE last night...   8-)

 
 
 

Grandmother's flower garden

Post by KatQuil » Sun, 01 Nov 1998 04:00:00


Quote:
>Hubba bubba, Ms. Kathy!! How was he....er, I mean it, yeah, the date? :-D

My my.......who'd a thought one little sentence from me could cause such a
flap....ROTFLMAO.

He is nice.  He can carry on a conversation with words of more than two
syllables.  He knows how to laugh.  He has a discernable pulse.  He is
young...<VBG>.  He likes quilts.....need I say more??

Kathy....keeping you all on pins and needles in Holbrook, NY...nanner nanner
naahhhhner!   8-)

 
 
 

Grandmother's flower garden

Post by Ms. Pigle » Sun, 01 Nov 1998 04:00:00


Up front, I'll admit it's my favorite design...but I love hexes.

The main question is, are you looking to hand piece, or machine piece? While
you *can*, theoretically, machine piece anything, hexes are easier to hand
piece.  That does have the virtue, if your machine is off somewhere besides
where the TV is, of letting you piece while watching the idiot box (and you
can feel good about "I'm not off in my corner, I'm socializing with the
family" if it's in the evening and they're watching the box anyhow.<G>)

If you're looking for something quick and machiney, you might want to look
at doing a nine patch or one of the myriad designs that's nine patch based.

--
piglet (megan zurawicz)

genealogy--http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~piglet
quilting--http://pw1.netcom.com/~pigolit/index.htm
ICQ: 18429839

Quote:

>I have always manted to make a patchwork quilt. Is this Grandmother's
>flower garden a suitable project for a beginner? Suggestions please.

 
 
 

Grandmother's flower garden

Post by Tiina Kujal » Sun, 01 Nov 1998 04:00:00


.  He likes quilts.....need I say more??
But will he take you out for S.E.X after dinner??? ; )

Tiina

 
 
 

Grandmother's flower garden

Post by Mary Hancoc » Sun, 01 Nov 1998 04:00:00


S***quilts are my favorite too. The more prints and color the better.
Still I would not start GFG if I were still a beginner. Although I really
should not talk. I did my first quilt in what I learned later was an
advanced pattern - Hands All Round. Lots of curves and points. It looked
okay but if I had known it was an advanced design I would never have tried
it. So maybe I should not say not to do it. Everyone is different. It just
takes patience and getting those points to come out sharp. I don't do the
English paper piecing though. I just pin very well and anchor my thread. It
always comes out looking as though I paper pieced it.
Quote:

>I got hooked on GFG at quilt class a couple of weeks ago.  A great way
>to use up scraps and fill the time you have to just sit and wait.  It is
>my new sit and wait project.  I expect (since I am only working on it as
>a waiting project) that it will take a year to get the top done  If I
>get busy and have more scraps to use up.  I imagine it would be easier
>if you used yardage but........I ike s***quilts.   :-)
>MaryAnne

 
 
 

Grandmother's flower garden

Post by sarah curr » Sun, 01 Nov 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

> I have always manted to make a patchwork quilt. Is this Grandmother's
> flower garden a suitable project for a beginner? Suggestions please.

Sarah (nice name  :-)  ), this is the place to come with your
questions.  Welcome, and where are you?  (I "pin" folks on my atlas, you
see)
        If you're a beginner (and it sounds like you are),  I'd counsel against
a grandmother's flower garden (gfg) as your place-to-start.  It's not an
easy pattern (lots of little set-in seams, AND all those patches to cut
out -- a daunting task, even with a rotary cutter) -- and yes, it's
GORGEOUS (and most everyone's favorite to look at -- and remember from
when they were little).
        I'd recommend that you first decide whether you want to hand-piece
(sewing each patch onto the other by hand) or machine-piece (use that
sewing machine -- you didn't mention whether you have one) -- or maybe
try some applique (not "patchwork", but oh-so-lovely, and lots of fun,
they tell me).
        First, hie yourself to your local quilt shop or your local library, and
just immerse yourself in the quilt-books.  You'll soon get a feel for
what you like.
        Second, decide on a pattern (most of us who piece, rather than
applique, strongly recommend a simple pattern, with straight seams --
although I suspect the applique-ers also recommend starting with a
relatively simple pattern).
        Third, head for the fabric store for some S.E.X. (that's Stash
Enhancement eXperience, before someone asks) -- and the fabric to begin
your quilt with.
        And then, take a class, join a guild (if those are available to you).
        Most of all, have FUN with this --
        and do keep us posted.  
        Happy Trails,
        Sarah in Las Cruces, NM
 
 
 

Grandmother's flower garden

Post by BZQL » Mon, 02 Nov 1998 04:00:00


ROFLMAO!
good Tiina!

Sherry - at the zoo

Quote:
>Tiina wrote-
>But will he take you out for S.E.X after dinner??? ; )

 
 
 

Grandmother's flower garden

Post by KatQuil » Mon, 02 Nov 1998 04:00:00


Quote:
>But will he take you out for S.E.X after dinner??? ; )

ROTFLMAO, Tiina.........

Any man who really wants to win my heart will have to accept and understand my
appetite for really great  S.E.X.    If not.......hit the highway.........LOL

I'll keep you all posted on this......

Kathy

 
 
 

Grandmother's flower garden

Post by Elliso » Mon, 02 Nov 1998 04:00:00


Howdy!
    One of my favorite quilts, and one of my earliest,
is a Pinwheel.   The points are very pointy.   I didn't realize
at the time that they were supposed to be pointy as a matter
of pride; I just made it the way the picture showed.  <g>    
2nd time I went to make pointy points, I was setting a square on
point inside the block, and cut off all the corners:   oh, no!
no points!!   <g>    So I looked at that block, turned it,
twisted it, thought about taking it apart, and decided, Nope!
It is what it is.   Then made a whole bunch more of those
cut-off-the-corner blocks.    And quilted cats into the center
of each block:  The Cat Ate the Corners!  
   After the first 1/2 dozen, tho', it became more
difficult to deliberately cut off those corners; like trying
to deliberately sing off key---  by accident is easy, on
purpose is weird!    <g>
--
Ragmop --no one told me Double Wedding Ring was also
                 not "easy" .....   <g>
http://www.FoundCollection.com/~Ellison-Texas


Quote:
> S***quilts are my favorite too. The more prints and color the better.
> Still I would not start GFG if I were still a beginner. Although I really
> should not talk. I did my first quilt in what I learned later was an
> advanced pattern - Hands All Round. Lots of curves and points. It looked
> okay but if I had known it was an advanced design I would never have
tried
> it. So maybe I should not say not to do it. Everyone is different. It
just
> takes patience and getting those points to come out sharp. I don't do the
> English paper piecing though. I just pin very well and anchor my thread.
It
> always comes out looking as though I paper pieced it.

 
 
 

Grandmother's flower garden

Post by polkaquee » Tue, 03 Nov 1998 04:00:00


hi i agree with  sarah i have one my grandmother made that is on my wall. i
have considered doing this till i stand and look at it and think no way.
the one i have means the world to me but it looks too complicated for me  
nadine in missouri



Quote:

> > I have always manted to make a patchwork quilt. Is this Grandmother's
> > flower garden a suitable project for a beginner? Suggestions please.

> Sarah (nice name  :-)  ), this is the place to come with your
> questions.  Welcome, and where are you?  (I "pin" folks on my atlas, you
> see)
>    If you're a beginner (and it sounds like you are),  I'd counsel against
> a grandmother's flower garden (gfg) as your place-to-start.  It's not an
> easy pattern (lots of little set-in seams, AND all those patches to cut
> out -- a daunting task, even with a rotary cutter) -- and yes, it's
> GORGEOUS (and most everyone's favorite to look at -- and remember from
> when they were little).
>    I'd recommend that you first decide whether you want to hand-piece
> (sewing each patch onto the other by hand) or machine-piece (use that
> sewing machine -- you didn't mention whether you have one) -- or maybe
> try some applique (not "patchwork", but oh-so-lovely, and lots of fun,
> they tell me).
>    First, hie yourself to your local quilt shop or your local library, and
> just immerse yourself in the quilt-books.  You'll soon get a feel for
> what you like.
>    Second, decide on a pattern (most of us who piece, rather than
> applique, strongly recommend a simple pattern, with straight seams --
> although I suspect the applique-ers also recommend starting with a
> relatively simple pattern).
>    Third, head for the fabric store for some S.E.X. (that's Stash
> Enhancement eXperience, before someone asks) -- and the fabric to begin
> your quilt with.
>    And then, take a class, join a guild (if those are available to you).
>    Most of all, have FUN with this --
>    and do keep us posted.  
>    Happy Trails,
>    Sarah in Las Cruces, NM