Getting started-Help

Getting started-Help

Post by sari » Wed, 12 Jun 1996 04:00:00



I would like to make a wall*** to start with, but feel so intimated
about what colors to use.  Are there any guidlines as to what looks good
together?  How do you start?
 I have quite a bit of fabric that I have bought over the years thinking I
would put it into a quilt but so far haven't done much.    I tried  an
assortment of prints in a block once and it looked awful.  I would like to
use up some of my fabric but need some help in choosing color
combinations.
 I hope this is something that can be acquired and not an artistic thing
you are born with.

I did take a log cabin class a few years ago using blues and white.  That
turned out pretty well.

Thanks for any advice,

Sarita in cloudy Illinois.

 
 
 

Getting started-Help

Post by Jean Overmeye » Wed, 12 Jun 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

> I would like to make a wall*** to start with, but feel so intimated
> about what colors to use.  Are there any guidlines as to what looks good
> together?  How do you start?
>  I have quite a bit of fabric that I have bought over the years thinking I
> would put it into a quilt but so far haven't done much.    I tried  an
> assortment of prints in a block once and it looked awful.  I would like to
> use up some of my fabric but need some help in choosing color
> combinations.
>  I hope this is something that can be acquired and not an artistic thing
> you are born with.

> I did take a log cabin class a few years ago using blues and white.  That
> turned out pretty well.

> Thanks for any advice,

> Sarita in cloudy Illinois.Sarita,

        If you feel intimidated about choosing colors for an initial
project, maybe you could just keep it simple for now.  Try choosing just
two or three colors that you like together.  Simple color schemes can be
very dramatic and pleasing.  (you said that you liked your log cabin in
blues and whites.)  It may help alot if you know where your wall***
will be used/displayed.  Perhaps you'll want to match the surrounding
decor (but still keeping to a mono- or di-chromatic color scheme.)
        In the meantime, when you see other quilts that really catch
your eye, notice not just the pattern, but also the number of different
colors and the combinations that are appealing to you.  Remember, there
is no right and wrong here, it's what's appealing to YOU.  Do you find
yourself drawn toward pastels, or jewel tones? bright or muted colors,
etc.  Another thing that I've found useful is to step back from a
multi-colored piece and ask myself what colors were pre***, or what
would I say were in this quilt if I were to describe it to someone else.
 THEN, look closely again, and see how many other colors are also
present.
        My personal opinion is that you LEARN how to put colors together
 that you enjoy.  You don't necessarily inherit this trait.  So don't
worry, start out simple and build up to more complex color schemes.

Have fun!

Jean

 
 
 

Getting started-Help

Post by DDuperau » Wed, 12 Jun 1996 04:00:00



Quote:

>I would like to make a wall*** to start with, but feel so intimated
>about what colors to use.  Are there any guidlines as to what looks good
>together?  How do you start?

One word: Contrast.

You want fabrics that DON'T match. Dark solid blue and a pale pink plaid.
Green stripes and an orange fl***print. Royal purple and lemon yellow.

It's easy to do with two, or maybe three fabrics. Pick one dark dark
print, maybe a solid or simple geometric. Pick one light light print,
maybe with a very subdued print. Pick something that contrasts with the
dark print --an opposite colour or a bright obnoxious print.

Use a lot of the dark and the light, and a little bit of the contrast
print.

                          Dawn

Ba*** was a Librarian, too.
http://www.FoundCollection.com/~dduperal/

 
 
 

Getting started-Help

Post by Scott Landvatt » Thu, 13 Jun 1996 04:00:00



Quote:

> I would like to make a wall*** to start with, but feel so intimated
> about what colors to use.  Are there any guidlines as to what looks good
> together?  How do you start?
>  I have quite a bit of fabric that I have bought over the years thinking I
> would put it into a quilt but so far haven't done much.    I tried  an
> assortment of prints in a block once and it looked awful.  I would like to
> use up some of my fabric but need some help in choosing color
> combinations.
>  I hope this is something that can be acquired and not an artistic thing
> you are born with.

> I did take a log cabin class a few years ago using blues and white.  That
> turned out pretty well.

> Thanks for any advice,

> Sarita in cloudy Illinois.

   I've found that a good jumping off place is to find a multicolored
print that you like and draw the colors from that.  Don't try to exactly
match them, lighter or darker is fine.  This will give you some idea of
how the colors work together.  There is a good book on this subject,
"Color and Cloth" by Mary Coyne Penders.  I don't know if it is still in
print but your library may have it, mine does.  Good luck with your
planning.

                                       Edith

 
 
 

Getting started-Help

Post by Nancy Wals » Thu, 13 Jun 1996 04:00:00


So far everyone's suggestions have been to use multiple colors. Why?  If that
really intimidates you (esp for your first quilt!) then pick a color - say BLUE
(Hi Audrey!! *Grin*) and then pick out a few different BLUEs that you think go
together and a neutral background.  Either a nine patch or any traditional
pattern will look _great_ this way.  If you feel a bit adventurous then put some
blue-greens in, or maybe a blue-purple.  It doesn't have to be an fancy-schmancy
art quilt to be a great quilt.  I love the old-traditional two color quilts
where one of the colors is a while or cream.  White on White prints (Or cream on
cream) are great fun to play with too and might add a little "up close" interest
to it if you feel that all white might be too boring.

Don't make a queen sized quilt for your first - that'll take too long and unless
you are a really obsessive person (like myself) then you'll probably get tired
of it before it gets done.  I love lap quilts - they piece quickly, they
don't have to be any set size (Does it fit your lap? Then it's the right size),
and they are great for draping over things to display.  (My next house _will_ be
two story so I have lots of bannisters to cover with quilts!!!)  Lap quilts are
also great for giving you the  idea of what it would be like to hand or machine
quilt a fuller size quilt - without all the aggravation that comes with a full
bed sized quilt.

Wing it - it's your quilt, and have fun!!

-Nancy

--

 
 
 

Getting started-Help

Post by DDuperau » Fri, 14 Jun 1996 04:00:00



Quote:
(Nancy Walsh~) writes:
>So far everyone's suggestions have been to use multiple colors. Why?

Because there is little or no contrast. You use all blues and from ten
feet away you can't tell them apart. Ugh. So much for having a pattern.

Which, I think, was what the author was complaining about in the first
place-- that she had picked fabrics which blended so well it looked bad
because there was no pattern or design in the quilt.

                             Dawn

Ba*** was a Librarian, too.
http://www.FoundCollection.com/~dduperal/

 
 
 

Getting started-Help

Post by Jackie L. Brew » Fri, 14 Jun 1996 04:00:00


If you like the way the colors look together, then they go
together - as long as there is enough contrast so the peicing
pattern shows up.  Before cutting out the whole project and
before sewing anything, you can test how the fabrics work
together by cutting a few of the pieces from each fabric,
arranging them as they'll be in the final project, and looking
at them from a few feet away.  (In some cases you can get an
idea by just folding the fabric to the approximate shape and
size).  

What I have trouble with is knowing which prints will look
good together.  Does anyone have advice on this?

Jackie

 
 
 

Getting started-Help

Post by Audrey or Pete Morri » Fri, 14 Jun 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

> Because there is little or no contrast. You use all blues and from ten
> feet away you can't tell them apart. Ugh. So much for having a pattern.

Dawn,

I think you are way out of line to call my quilt ugly without even
seeing it (granted, no one can, since it isn't cut out or pieced yet). I
know perfectly well that when this quilt is finished I'll be able to
tell my blues apart from well over 10 feet away--the only person with
good vision I can think of who may not be able to is my brother, who is
color blind, but generally he only has trouble with greens and browns.
And on top of that, the pattern will be very obvious since it will be
with a light (yes, that creates contrast), as Nancy said. The block is
all picked out and sizes are determined.

I thought this group was for support, not insults. This is my first
quilt, and I know it won't be perfect, and no, it isn't an "art" quilt,
but that does not make me any less deserving of support than those who
enjoy creating their own designs.

Audrey (hi Nancy!)

 
 
 

Getting started-Help

Post by DDuperau » Sat, 15 Jun 1996 04:00:00



Quote:

>> Because there is little or no contrast. You use all blues and from ten
>> feet away you can't tell them apart. Ugh. So much for having a pattern.

>Dawn,

>I think you are way out of line to call my quilt ugly without even
>seeing it (granted, no one can, since it isn't cut out or pieced yet).

Believe me, if I was going to insult your quilt, you'd know it.

I just said that I feel a block pattern made up of shades of one colour
does not have the dramatic contrast that _some_ people look for in a quilt
design.

If you're happy with that method, then good for you. It's your quilt.

My design opinions, and my quilts, will please me. Nobody else need be
concerned, unless they ask me for my design opinion. And when asked for
that opinion, I don't expect to be denounced for it.

                                 Dawn

Ba*** was a Librarian, too.
http://www.FoundCollection.com/~dduperal/

 
 
 

Getting started-Help

Post by Alic » Sun, 16 Jun 1996 04:00:00



: > Because there is little or no contrast. You use all blues and from ten
: > feet away you can't tell them apart. Ugh. So much for having a pattern.

: I think you are way out of line to call my quilt ugly without even
: seeing it (granted, no one can, since it isn't cut out or pieced yet). I
: know perfectly well that when this quilt is finished I'll be able to

Dawn was simply stating her opinion about color contrast.  I really think
you are being too sensitive here. I didn't take it in a negative way at
all.    

--
Alice                        

Quilters: Send email for information about my Bright & Wild FQ swap

 
 
 

Getting started-Help

Post by Jackie L. Brew » Sun, 16 Jun 1996 04:00:00


I took a class in paper-pieced Mariner's Compass this week, and
the block I made has three prints, each pre***ly in a tone of
blue-green.  I'm very pleased with the outcome (I think it looks
better than any of the teacher's samples, though hers have more
perfect points.)  So a quilt in different shades/tones of the
same color can be beautifull.

Jackie

 
 
 

Getting started-Help

Post by Nancy Wals » Tue, 18 Jun 1996 04:00:00


Quote:


> (Nancy Walsh~) writes:

> >So far everyone's suggestions have been to use multiple colors. Why?

> Because there is little or no contrast. You use all blues and from ten
> feet away you can't tell them apart. Ugh. So much for having a pattern.

Actually my point was to create the contrast by using a blue and a light (which for simplicity
could be a muslin). (or a green and muslin, or a pink and muslin).

Quote:
> Which, I think, was what the author was complaining about in the first
> place-- that she had picked fabrics which blended so well it looked bad
> because there was no pattern or design in the quilt.

>                              Dawn

> Ba*** was a Librarian, too.
> http://www.FoundCollection.com/~dduperal/

--

 
 
 

Getting started-Help

Post by Anita J. Fre » Tue, 18 Jun 1996 04:00:00




Quote:
> What I have trouble with is knowing which prints will look
> good together.  Does anyone have advice on this?

Try looking for prints that vary in scale -- a tight, busy fl***
paired with an airy celestrial print, for example. Personally, I like
quilts that have a lot of visual variety.

'Nita in Danvers