What ever happened to basic, uncomplicated sewing machines?

What ever happened to basic, uncomplicated sewing machines?

Post by Franfog » Mon, 06 Feb 1995 07:59:54



I also have an old Singer--a used model 500A that I bought in 1965!  It's
still in fine fettle and nothing ever goes wrong with it.  Of course I am
careful to clean, lubricate and oil it a few times a year.  The best thing
about these old machines is their simplicity.   Unlike the computerized
models, where one thing going awry can knock out other functions, these
all-metal workhorses go on forever.  I treasure it--it's like having an
old Rolls Royce.
Fran
 
 
 

What ever happened to basic, uncomplicated sewing machines?

Post by Janet Wils » Mon, 06 Feb 1995 09:46:21


I too have a relatively old and simple machine...no electronics. But I
would be interested to know why one would upgrade to one of the $1000
machines...what makes them better and which features are the most useful.

I hand quilt but machine piece.

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What ever happened to basic, uncomplicated sewing machines?

Post by Joe Wojtuni » Tue, 07 Feb 1995 12:39:42


okay I'll be the first to speak for the new machines.  I own a
Pfaff 1475 (2,200) and I love everything about it.  I also own
an older Pfaff which does just basics and I would never get rid
of it.  My 1475 has:
1. Needle down, needle position, 1/4" quilting presser foot.
2. bobbin light that flashes when the bobbin is low.
3. unlimited amount of decorative stitches (if you want one not built
   in, just plug the machine into your PC and design your own)
4. Very light weight which is great for hauling to class.
5. Several different styles of built in buttonholes.
6. if you do heirloom sewing you can make your own entreduex.
I also spent another $1,000 for the top of the line Pfaff serger,
which I love.  My local Pfaff dealer offers free classes for life.
Can't beat that!
Kristie    --

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(206)-698-2373 voice                |
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What ever happened to basic, uncomplicated sewing machines?

Post by jjo.. » Tue, 07 Feb 1995 23:10:25


Quote:

>okay I'll be the first to speak for the new machines.  I own a
>Pfaff 1475 (2,200) and I love everything about it.  I also own
>an older Pfaff which does just basics and I would never get rid
>of it.  My 1475 has:
>1. Needle down, needle position, 1/4" quilting presser foot.
>2. bobbin light that flashes when the bobbin is low.

I have to agree, the bobbin light would be just lovely to have.  I sure
don't know what I would do with embroidery stitches, I guess I'm just not
into that kind of sewing. Clothing is not where my skills lie.

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What ever happened to basic, uncomplicated sewing machines?

Post by Jo Wong - Western Area SE Adm » Thu, 09 Feb 1995 06:47:04


About 8 months ago I bought an Elna 9000 second hand (paid under 1K,
just under :-)).  I started quilting this year and decided I wanted
a new machine to use fancy threads and do specialty stitches.  I also
wanted a machine that I could sew knits and stretch fabrics on easily.  
My old machine (which I still have) is a Kenmore, about 15 yo, with ~8
stitch selections.  I just felt I had outgrown it.  Before that I used
an old, heavy black singer electric, made in the 30s or 40s.  It's
sitting out in the garage in pieces at the moment.  I'm refinishing and
repairing the cabinet.  Each time I upgraded it was because I wanted to
try something more complicated than I had been doing and didn't want
to use the modern fabrics and threads on a machine that was not designed
to handle them.  I could have figured out how to make it work, or purchased
special adaptive attachments to bring the old machines up-to-date, but
I go by the old adage "the right tool for the job".  For how I want to
sew now the Elna is a good match.  Also, once you upgrade to the more
expensive machines it's so hard to go back.  It's like once you get used
to writing on a computer it's hard to go back to a typewriter.

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Palo Alto, CA
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What ever happened to basic, uncomplicated sewing machines?

Post by Kevin Wi » Sat, 11 Feb 1995 04:05:25


: I have to agree, the bobbin light would be just lovely to have.  I sure
: don't know what I would do with embroidery stitches, I guess I'm just not
: into that kind of sewing. Clothing is not where my skills lie.

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I use the embroidery stitches on some of my quilts and wall***s
instead of a regular straight stitch.  I did one with preprinted duck
pillow panels simply sashed with navy blue.  I used a maroon thread and a
feather type embroidery stitch to go around all the blocks.  The family
that recieved the quilt just loves it.  They keep it in the living room
(that is where I planned for it to go) for snuggling while watching tv.
--
Kevin R. Winn                           Gwen Marie Winn

 
 
 

What ever happened to basic, uncomplicated sewing machines?

Post by Marina Salu » Sat, 11 Feb 1995 10:08:49


I also use the embroidery stitches on my machine for
quilts. I have used the feather stitch to quilt around
the edge of Dresden Plate blocks, and also for applique.
(it is less stiff than satin stitch)> I have also used
fl***vine and heart embroidery motifs to sew down the
binding on baby quilts.

--marina

 
 
 

What ever happened to basic, uncomplicated sewing machines?

Post by KAREN KELLNE » Sun, 12 Feb 1995 06:19:57


I have a White sewing machine that my father bought for my mother
right after they got married in 1950.  This machine is cast iron
and all parts are metal.  I learned to sew on this machine when I
was 8 years old and I've really never sewn on any other machine.
It only has a straight stitch, but a lot of attachments including
zig-zag, button-holer, binding, etc.  The button-holer is the only
one that gets a lot of use.  It's an old, very reliable machine and
I will never part with it.  I have used it for machine piecing,
making clothes and most recently for window coverings for all the
bedrooms in my new home.

Several months ago I had the opportunity to try out a brand new
Bernina.  I forget the model number, but it's the latest, most
computerized one.  What a nice machine!  I'm just afraid that I
would play with all the features for a couple of months and then
do straight stitching and buttonholes most of the time.   So, I
haven't run out and plopped down >$3,000 on one yet.  It sure would
be fun to play with though.

Just my .02 worth.

Karen Kellner

 
 
 

What ever happened to basic, uncomplicated sewing machines?

Post by The Polso » Sat, 18 Feb 1995 14:21:27


I do all my sewing (except buttonholes) on my 1891 Singer treadle machine.
It still runs like a clock, has no reverse (you have to knot the ends of
everything) and cannot use a buttonhole attachment because the feed dog
doesn't drop down, but I wouldn't use anything else. I piece all my quilts
on it, too (for those keeping score at home, this includes your Round
Robin Swap squares...!)


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