Fabric Paints help

Fabric Paints help

Post by Mickie Swal » Sat, 15 Aug 2009 06:51:13



I'm making a quilt with 48 cats and as I prepare the heads for turned-edge
machine applique, I find myself thinking about ways to avoid making
appliques pieces for their tiny noses!  I would like to consider using
fabric paints.  Long ago I bought some Gladys Grace fabric stencil paint
pots and brushes, but these are all dried up.  I'm not even sure what is
available in stores nowadays, so I need your help and advice, but I'm
thinking I can do the inside ears, eyes, and mouth markings like this as
well as the noses- maybe even whiskers too!  What kind of paints and what
method of application do you suggest?
TIA!,
Mickie
 
 
 

Fabric Paints help

Post by Jennifer in Ottaw » Sat, 15 Aug 2009 07:51:30


When I made Mum's "Bill & Ben" wallhanging, I used regular acrylic
craft paints with textile medium mixed in.  It worked like a charm and
the cost was minimal.  I also used the same type of acrylic paints to
decorate the tiles of my kitchen backsplash after I had painted them
out using regular house paint -  jennellh


Quote:
> I'm making a quilt with 48 cats and as I prepare the heads for turned-edge
> machine applique, I find myself thinking about ways to avoid making
> appliques pieces for their tiny noses! ?I would like to consider using
> fabric paints. ?Long ago I bought some Gladys Grace fabric stencil paint
> pots and brushes, but these are all dried up. ?I'm not even sure what is
> available in stores nowadays, so I need your help and advice, but I'm
> thinking I can do the inside ears, eyes, and mouth markings like this as
> well as the noses- maybe even whiskers too! ?What kind of paints and what
> method of application do you suggest?
> TIA!,
> Mickie


 
 
 

Fabric Paints help

Post by Polly Esthe » Sat, 15 Aug 2009 08:26:37


I do lots of that, Mickey.  Anita's All Purpose acrylic craft paint from
Hobby Lobby is nice to work with and holds up very well. Method of
application - shake well, pour about a teaspoon on a paper plate, apply with
a fine short bristle brush (mine says 10 on top of a 0) or toothpicks or
straight pins.  Stir the paint now and then, add a wee bit of water if
needed or pour another spoonful.  One bottle will probably do hundreds of
kitty noses, eyelashes, whatever.  You'll probably want to buy a bottle of
hot pink too, and a bottle of white to add a highlight to eyes on another
one day project.  Pay attention when you're choosing the paint.  You don't
want the puffy, glitter or the other wild and crazy paints.  I guess.  Polly



When I made Mum's "Bill & Ben" wallhanging, I used regular acrylic
craft paints with textile medium mixed in.  It worked like a charm and
the cost was minimal.  I also used the same type of acrylic paints to
decorate the tiles of my kitchen backsplash after I had painted them
out using regular house paint -  jennellh


Quote:
> I'm making a quilt with 48 cats and as I prepare the heads for turned-edge
> machine applique, I find myself thinking about ways to avoid making
> appliques pieces for their tiny noses! I would like to consider using
> fabric paints. Long ago I bought some Gladys Grace fabric stencil paint
> pots and brushes, but these are all dried up. I'm not even sure what is
> available in stores nowadays, so I need your help and advice, but I'm
> thinking I can do the inside ears, eyes, and mouth markings like this as
> well as the noses- maybe even whiskers too! What kind of paints and what
> method of application do you suggest?
> TIA!,
> Mickie

 
 
 

Fabric Paints help

Post by Gen » Sat, 15 Aug 2009 09:08:47


I've occ. used PIGMA pens for small areas.  Works well.  I have a stained
glass pattern that actually says to us a Sharpie marker for the leading in
small spaces.  Worked so well I have to really look to find marker vs. bias
leading.
Gen


Quote:
> I'm making a quilt with 48 cats and as I prepare the heads for turned-edge
> machine applique, I find myself thinking about ways to avoid making
> appliques pieces for their tiny noses!  I would like to consider using
> fabric paints.  Long ago I bought some Gladys Grace fabric stencil paint
> pots and brushes, but these are all dried up.  I'm not even sure what is
> available in stores nowadays, so I need your help and advice, but I'm
> thinking I can do the inside ears, eyes, and mouth markings like this as
> well as the noses- maybe even whiskers too!  What kind of paints and what
> method of application do you suggest?
> TIA!,
> Mickie

 
 
 

Fabric Paints help

Post by dealer8 » Sat, 15 Aug 2009 09:47:47



Quote:
> I'm making a quilt with 48 cats and as I prepare the heads for turned-edge
> machine applique, I find myself thinking about ways to avoid making
> appliques pieces for their tiny noses! ?I would like to consider using
> fabric paints. ?Long ago I bought some Gladys Grace fabric stencil paint
> pots and brushes, but these are all dried up. ?I'm not even sure what is
> available in stores nowadays, so I need your help and advice, but I'm
> thinking I can do the inside ears, eyes, and mouth markings like this as
> well as the noses- maybe even whiskers too! ?What kind of paints and what
> method of application do you suggest?
> TIA!,
> Mickie

I use regular acrylic  craft paint on fabric also.  I haven't used it
on quilts but have painted on jackets and sweatshirts and it works
wonderful and doesn't wash out or bleed.  Donna
 
 
 

Fabric Paints help

Post by NightMi » Sat, 15 Aug 2009 11:16:43


On Thu, 13 Aug 2009 17:51:13 -0400, "Mickie Swall"

Quote:

>I'm making a quilt with 48 cats and as I prepare the heads for turned-edge
>machine applique, I find myself thinking about ways to avoid making
>appliques pieces for their tiny noses!  I would like to consider using
>fabric paints.  Long ago I bought some Gladys Grace fabric stencil paint
>pots and brushes, but these are all dried up.  I'm not even sure what is
>available in stores nowadays, so I need your help and advice, but I'm
>thinking I can do the inside ears, eyes, and mouth markings like this as
>well as the noses- maybe even whiskers too!  What kind of paints and what
>method of application do you suggest?

I have used quite and assortment of paints depending on the purpose.
At this point I have enough types around that I can mix and match at
will.

For something like this I would probably use Neopaque and Dye-Na-Flow
in combination. Dye-Na-Flow has the best hand, but it does behave like
a dye, the Neopaque has good hand, but is still somewhat stiff. If you
use the Neopaque on the outter edges of the vaious color sections of
the work, it will keep the Dye-Na-Flow contained to the area you want
it in.  They are both Jaquard products and totally compatible with
each other.  Most acrylics are actually compatible, but sometimes you
get a freaky reation between pigments, particularly combining very
high end brands, or very low end brands. Setting time can also vary
between brands sometimes.  If you want something a little less
expensive than Neopaque you could use the Jaquard Traditional Textile
colors, they are quite as good, just not quite as opaque.

My second choice would be a decent screen printing ink. If you can
find the smaller tubes. Often you can only find those in pints or
quarts since they are mostly used by silk screeners.

Third choice would be Dr.PH Martin's Spectralite acrylic airbrush ink.
It sets beautifully, comes in wonderful colors, and has a great hand.
You do not have to add fabric medium to it, though as I recall they
make a medium that eliminates the need to heat set.
It is also very expensive by comparison, and is a little tricky to use
by hand.

NightMist
--

Legolas is my house elf

 
 
 

Fabric Paints help

Post by EstelleU » Sat, 15 Aug 2009 21:37:45


Over here we have fabric paints by "Stewart Gill" sp! They work very well.
Don't know if you have that brand, but they have improved in general.
--
Estelle UK
http://community.webshots.com/user/


Quote:
> I'm making a quilt with 48 cats and as I prepare the heads for turned-edge
> machine applique, I find myself thinking about ways to avoid making
> appliques pieces for their tiny noses!  I would like to consider using
> fabric paints.  Long ago I bought some Gladys Grace fabric stencil paint
> pots and brushes, but these are all dried up.  I'm not even sure what is
> available in stores nowadays, so I need your help and advice, but I'm
> thinking I can do the inside ears, eyes, and mouth markings like this as
> well as the noses- maybe even whiskers too!  What kind of paints and what
> method of application do you suggest?
> TIA!,
> Mickie

 
 
 

Fabric Paints help

Post by Polly Esthe » Sat, 15 Aug 2009 21:46:21


Forgot to warn you, Mickie.  If you have a feline QI who likes to
participate in all matters, do Not leave wet paint within reach (whatever
that may be).  A kitty could have unlimited fun with a wee puddle of wet
paint . . . and it could be a forever memento.  Polly
 
 
 

Fabric Paints help

Post by Mickie Swal » Sat, 15 Aug 2009 22:55:28


2 kitties = double mementos
Thanks for the warning!  LOL
Mickie


Quote:
> Forgot to warn you, Mickie.  If you have a feline QI who likes to
> participate in all matters, do Not leave wet paint within reach (whatever
> that may be).  A kitty could have unlimited fun with a wee puddle of wet
> paint . . . and it could be a forever memento.  Polly

 
 
 

Fabric Paints help

Post by Mickie Swal » Sat, 15 Aug 2009 22:58:25


Would acrylics be soft enough for a bed quilt?
I don't think stiff bits would be desirable, but good
choice because permanent and waterproof.
Mickie



When I made Mum's "Bill & Ben" wallhanging, I used regular acrylic
craft paints with textile medium mixed in.  It worked like a charm and
the cost was minimal.  I also used the same type of acrylic paints to
decorate the tiles of my kitchen backsplash after I had painted them
out using regular house paint -  jennellh


Quote:
> I'm making a quilt with 48 cats and as I prepare the heads for turned-edge
> machine applique, I find myself thinking about ways to avoid making
> appliques pieces for their tiny noses! I would like to consider using
> fabric paints. Long ago I bought some Gladys Grace fabric stencil paint
> pots and brushes, but these are all dried up. I'm not even sure what is
> available in stores nowadays, so I need your help and advice, but I'm
> thinking I can do the inside ears, eyes, and mouth markings like this as
> well as the noses- maybe even whiskers too! What kind of paints and what
> method of application do you suggest?
> TIA!,
> Mickie

 
 
 

Fabric Paints help

Post by Mickie Swal » Sat, 15 Aug 2009 23:04:19


I don't remember where I heard it, but isn't Sharpie supposed
to be a no-no in the quilt world?  Probably fine for a wallhanging
but this is a quilt that will be (I hope) used on a bed.
I remember doing Gladys Grace's stenciling and the paint was
pounced in the stencil spaces - sharp edges and softer in the
center. That is the effect I want - PIGMA sounds good, and
the white and black pens I have will work for the eyes (sleeping)
and the mouths. I will get a grey one too!


Quote:
> I've occ. used PIGMA pens for small areas.  Works well.  I have a stained
> glass pattern that actually says to us a Sharpie marker for the leading in
> small spaces.  Worked so well I have to really look to find marker vs.
> bias leading.
> Gen

 
 
 

Fabric Paints help

Post by Mickie Swal » Sat, 15 Aug 2009 23:06:04


This will work on the ears and noses, I think, if I "pounce"
it on with a semi-dry brush through holes in the stencil.
Thanks!
Mickie


I use regular acrylic  craft paint on fabric also.  I haven't used it
on quilts but have painted on jackets and sweatshirts and it works
wonderful and doesn't wash out or bleed.  Donna

 
 
 

Fabric Paints help

Post by Mickie Swal » Sat, 15 Aug 2009 23:10:43


Choice #2 seems the most doable.  I only have to buy
black and white, will mix the shades of grey, so the
cost wont be a big issue.  The cats are all black or grey
on a white background.  I sugested spots of pink or
beige for the ears and noses, customer says no, has
to be all black and white and shades of grey.
Thank you for your suggestions
Mickie


Quote:
> I have used quite and assortment of paints depending on the purpose.
> At this point I have enough types around that I can mix and match at
> will.

> For something like this I would probably use Neopaque and Dye-Na-Flow
> in combination. Dye-Na-Flow has the best hand, but it does behave like
> a dye, the Neopaque has good hand, but is still somewhat stiff. If you
> use the Neopaque on the outter edges of the vaious color sections of
> the work, it will keep the Dye-Na-Flow contained to the area you want
> it in.  They are both Jaquard products and totally compatible with
> each other.  Most acrylics are actually compatible, but sometimes you
> get a freaky reation between pigments, particularly combining very
> high end brands, or very low end brands. Setting time can also vary
> between brands sometimes.  If you want something a little less
> expensive than Neopaque you could use the Jaquard Traditional Textile
> colors, they are quite as good, just not quite as opaque.

> My second choice would be a decent screen printing ink. If you can
> find the smaller tubes. Often you can only find those in pints or
> quarts since they are mostly used by silk screeners.

> Third choice would be Dr.PH Martin's Spectralite acrylic airbrush ink.
> It sets beautifully, comes in wonderful colors, and has a great hand.
> You do not have to add fabric medium to it, though as I recall they
> make a medium that eliminates the need to heat set.
> It is also very expensive by comparison, and is a little tricky to use
> by hand.

> NightMist
> --

> Legolas is my house elf

 
 
 

Fabric Paints help

Post by Mickie Swal » Sat, 15 Aug 2009 23:13:19


Will be doing the fabric paint aisle at JoAnns today,
now I have all the advice and suggestions I will be
an informed shopper!  We have a lot of the same
brands as UK, but you guys seem to have a better
selection over there ;)  I will look for Stewart Gill.
Thanks, Estelle!
Mickie


Quote:
> Over here we have fabric paints by "Stewart Gill" sp! They work very well.
> Don't know if you have that brand, but they have improved in general.
> --
> Estelle UK
> http://community.webshots.com/user/

 
 
 

Fabric Paints help

Post by Polly Esthe » Sat, 15 Aug 2009 23:34:01


I guess there is just a little bit of stiffness involved right at first -
but we're only talking about kitty noses and whiskers and the like, right?
Probably you wouldn't want to do a life-size painting of Elvis on a quilt
with acrylics but you weren't going to paint anything big were you?
Naaaaah.  Also, I've been going through my quilt magazines on an inspiration
dig and always enjoy seeing your quilts.  They are all so wonderful.  Polly

"Mickie Swall" <wrote> Would acrylics be soft enough for a bed quilt?

Quote:
> I don't think stiff bits would be desirable, but good
> choice because permanent and waterproof.
> Mickie