OT: student teaching in Europe

OT: student teaching in Europe

Post by Hanne Gottliebse » Wed, 13 Oct 2004 23:59:29



OK, I never taught in schools, but: I did spend my 3rd year at college
as a student in Wales (I'm from Denmark). I've also lived in Scotland
(grad school). And now I'm in London (which is _way_ expensive,
something she should definitely consider).

I have quite a few UK friends who went on to do teaching degrees and did
training in various schools around the UK. They liked the support etc
they got.

In Scotland I also had lots of student friends from the US who were
there for a year studying.

Personally I think travelling like that (I know, it is work, not really
"travel", you know what I mean) is great. Spend some time somewhere, got
to know the locals. For her it would also give the benefit of getting to
know something of another education system (surely that would be good too).

Of course, for a weekend in London I could offer her, you or both of you
a bed 30 min from the City centre :-)

If you tells us what kind of music teaching she does, that might help
some too. I have a relative south of London who's a music teacher. She
works for the county and travels to different schools to give flute
lessons to small groups. I'd be happy to ask her some more specific
questions, if you'd like (but probably you don't know at this point either).

Hanne in London

Quote:

> DD who is a senior music education major called home last night all e***d
> over the prospect of doing part of her student teaching next fall out of the
> US.  She said she wanted to put in a request for England, Scotland or
> Ireland.  Have any of you had children who did this?  Have any of you in
> those countries had student teachers from the U.S. in your schools?  What
> were your impressions of this experience?  Of course in the back of my mind
> I'm thinking.....I know some quilters in those countries who could keep an
> eye on her!  Or I could come visit her AND meet some online friends!
> Hummmmmmm.  I think she was surprised when I didn't look at her and
> say....are you kidding??
>  When she was in high school she went on a three week tour with a very large
> concert band from the state that traveled through several European countries
> and she's been trying to get back ever since.   This might be a good way to
> do it.
> I'll be interested to hear what you all think.

> Kathyl
> remove "nospam-"  before mchsi
> http://www.FoundCollection.com/

 
 
 

OT: student teaching in Europe

Post by KJ » Thu, 14 Oct 2004 00:33:13


DD is hoping to be a high school band director eventually.  Her instument(s)
of study is percussion....all drums, mallet instruments and all the other
fun noisemakers :-) percussionists get to bang on.  The student teaching
experience will include 8 weeks in an elementary situation that she thinks
she would do here in the area, then 8 weeks of upper level instruction she
would like to do overseas.  She has been teaching drumlines for local high
school marching bands for several years while in college and feels she is
very familiar with high school instruction techniques.  So a different
education system would be a good experience.  She would be responsible for
housing costs and was told it could be anything from a home stay, a hostel
or a bed and breakfast situation.  I'll keep in mind that London is
expensive.


Quote:
> OK, I never taught in schools, but: I did spend my 3rd year at college
> as a student in Wales (I'm from Denmark). I've also lived in Scotland
> (grad school). And now I'm in London (which is _way_ expensive,
> something she should definitely consider).

> I have quite a few UK friends who went on to do teaching degrees and did
> training in various schools around the UK. They liked the support etc
> they got.

> In Scotland I also had lots of student friends from the US who were
> there for a year studying.

> Personally I think travelling like that (I know, it is work, not really
> "travel", you know what I mean) is great. Spend some time somewhere, got
> to know the locals. For her it would also give the benefit of getting to
> know something of another education system (surely that would be good
too).

> Of course, for a weekend in London I could offer her, you or both of you
> a bed 30 min from the City centre :-)

> If you tells us what kind of music teaching she does, that might help
> some too. I have a relative south of London who's a music teacher. She
> works for the county and travels to different schools to give flute
> lessons to small groups. I'd be happy to ask her some more specific
> questions, if you'd like (but probably you don't know at this point
either).

> Hanne in London


> > DD who is a senior music education major called home last night all
e***d
> > over the prospect of doing part of her student teaching next fall out of
the
> > US.  She said she wanted to put in a request for England, Scotland or
> > Ireland.  Have any of you had children who did this?  Have any of you in
> > those countries had student teachers from the U.S. in your schools?
What
> > were your impressions of this experience?  Of course in the back of my
mind
> > I'm thinking.....I know some quilters in those countries who could keep
an
> > eye on her!  Or I could come visit her AND meet some online friends!
> > Hummmmmmm.  I think she was surprised when I didn't look at her and
> > say....are you kidding??
> >  When she was in high school she went on a three week tour with a very
large
> > concert band from the state that traveled through several European
countries
> > and she's been trying to get back ever since.   This might be a good way
to
> > do it.
> > I'll be interested to hear what you all think.

> > Kathyl
> > remove "nospam-"  before mchsi
> > http://www.FoundCollection.com/


 
 
 

OT: student teaching in Europe

Post by Hanne Gottliebse » Thu, 14 Oct 2004 00:42:31


I'll ask my aunt how it works (I need to call her anyway). But it sounds
to me like she'd be a real asset to any school (or local school
authority), and I'm sure she'd learn lots more too.

Hanne

Quote:

> DD is hoping to be a high school band director eventually.  Her instument(s)
> of study is percussion....all drums, mallet instruments and all the other
> fun noisemakers :-) percussionists get to bang on.  The student teaching
> experience will include 8 weeks in an elementary situation that she thinks
> she would do here in the area, then 8 weeks of upper level instruction she
> would like to do overseas.  She has been teaching drumlines for local high
> school marching bands for several years while in college and feels she is
> very familiar with high school instruction techniques.  So a different
> education system would be a good experience.  She would be responsible for
> housing costs and was told it could be anything from a home stay, a hostel
> or a bed and breakfast situation.  I'll keep in mind that London is
> expensive.



>>OK, I never taught in schools, but: I did spend my 3rd year at college
>>as a student in Wales (I'm from Denmark). I've also lived in Scotland
>>(grad school). And now I'm in London (which is _way_ expensive,
>>something she should definitely consider).

>>I have quite a few UK friends who went on to do teaching degrees and did
>>training in various schools around the UK. They liked the support etc
>>they got.

>>In Scotland I also had lots of student friends from the US who were
>>there for a year studying.

>>Personally I think travelling like that (I know, it is work, not really
>>"travel", you know what I mean) is great. Spend some time somewhere, got
>>to know the locals. For her it would also give the benefit of getting to
>>know something of another education system (surely that would be good

> too).

>>Of course, for a weekend in London I could offer her, you or both of you
>>a bed 30 min from the City centre :-)

>>If you tells us what kind of music teaching she does, that might help
>>some too. I have a relative south of London who's a music teacher. She
>>works for the county and travels to different schools to give flute
>>lessons to small groups. I'd be happy to ask her some more specific
>>questions, if you'd like (but probably you don't know at this point

> either).

>>Hanne in London


>>>DD who is a senior music education major called home last night all

> e***d

>>>over the prospect of doing part of her student teaching next fall out of

> the

>>>US.  She said she wanted to put in a request for England, Scotland or
>>>Ireland.  Have any of you had children who did this?  Have any of you in
>>>those countries had student teachers from the U.S. in your schools?

> What

>>>were your impressions of this experience?  Of course in the back of my

> mind

>>>I'm thinking.....I know some quilters in those countries who could keep

> an

>>>eye on her!  Or I could come visit her AND meet some online friends!
>>>Hummmmmmm.  I think she was surprised when I didn't look at her and
>>>say....are you kidding??
>>> When she was in high school she went on a three week tour with a very

> large

>>>concert band from the state that traveled through several European

> countries

>>>and she's been trying to get back ever since.   This might be a good way

> to

>>>do it.
>>>I'll be interested to hear what you all think.

>>>Kathyl
>>>remove "nospam-"  before mchsi
>>>http://www.FoundCollection.com/

 
 
 

OT: student teaching in Europe

Post by bogus addre » Thu, 14 Oct 2004 09:06:01


Quote:
> DD who is a senior music education major called home last night all
> e***d over the prospect of doing part of her student teaching next
> fall out of the US.  She said she wanted to put in a request for
> England, Scotland or Ireland.

I don't think any of them will recognize a US education qualification for
teaching in schools, still less part of one.  Teaching qualifications
aren't even transferable between England and Scotland without retraining
to handle the different syllabuses.

Try the Scottish Education Department for the situation here.  But I'd
be very surprised if they'd let her near a school without several months
in a teacher training college first.

Music teaching is a bit different, but there is a huge oversupply and
most are part-time (touring several schools in a region) and insecure.

========> Email to "j-c" at this site; email to "bogus" will bounce <========
Jack Campin: 11 Third Street, Newtongrange, Midlothian EH22 4PU; 0131 6604760
<http://www.FoundCollection.com/;  food intolerance data & recipes,
Mac logic fonts, Scots traditional music files and CD-ROMs of Scottish music.

 
 
 

OT: student teaching in Europe

Post by Kate Dice » Fri, 15 Oct 2004 00:52:19


Quote:

> But ... I undetstood that this is meant to be part of her teaching
> qualification. Like UK students at teacher training college spends time
> in schools.

Yes, arranged with specific schools months (and even on a year to year
basis!) ahead of the teaching practice.  The college needs to supervise
the student's teaching, and see a variety of lesson: who would be her
college support?  And there may be a problem with her doing this as part
of a foreign teaching qualification not recognised here in the UK.  It's
well worth asking, but expect difficulties!

Quote:

> So someone at the school needs to work with the trainee teacher, but
> gets another pair of hands/ears in the classroom.

Doesn't quite work that way...

Oh, and does she have a valid UK police check?  She won't get anywhere
near kids without one!

Quote:

> That's what I thought Kathyl's DD was going to do??

> Hanne


>>> DD who is a senior music education major called home last night all
>>> e***d over the prospect of doing part of her student teaching next
>>> fall out of the US.  She said she wanted to put in a request for
>>> England, Scotland or Ireland.

>> I don't think any of them will recognize a US education qualification for
>> teaching in schools, still less part of one.  Teaching qualifications
>> aren't even transferable between England and Scotland without retraining
>> to handle the different syllabuses.

>> Try the Scottish Education Department for the situation here.  But I'd
>> be very surprised if they'd let her near a school without several months
>> in a teacher training college first.

>> Music teaching is a bit different, but there is a huge oversupply and
>> most are part-time (touring several schools in a region) and insecure.

>> ========> Email to "j-c" at this site; email to "bogus" will bounce
>> <========
>> Jack Campin: 11 Third Street, Newtongrange, Midlothian EH22 4PU; 0131
>> 6604760
>> <http://www.FoundCollection.com/;  food intolerance data &
>> recipes,
>> Mac logic fonts, Scots traditional music files and CD-ROMs of Scottish
>> music.

--
Kate  XXXXXX
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe *** of the Chocolate Buttons
http://www.FoundCollection.com/
Click on Kate's Pages and explore!
 
 
 

OT: student teaching in Europe

Post by KJ » Thu, 14 Oct 2004 22:33:39


Interesting.  The university already has these countries as options for
overseas student teaching opportunities.  So I'm assuming there is some sort
of cooperative system already set up.  She would be shadowing a teacher and
teaching while supervised by that teacher.
Thanks for the thoughts.  I'm saving them all to give her.

--
Kathyl
remove "nospam-"  before mchsi
http://www.FoundCollection.com/


Quote:

> > DD who is a senior music education major called home last night all
> > e***d over the prospect of doing part of her student teaching next
> > fall out of the US.  She said she wanted to put in a request for
> > England, Scotland or Ireland.

> I don't think any of them will recognize a US education qualification for
> teaching in schools, still less part of one.  Teaching qualifications
> aren't even transferable between England and Scotland without retraining
> to handle the different syllabuses.

> Try the Scottish Education Department for the situation here.  But I'd
> be very surprised if they'd let her near a school without several months
> in a teacher training college first.

> Music teaching is a bit different, but there is a huge oversupply and
> most are part-time (touring several schools in a region) and insecure.

> ========> Email to "j-c" at this site; email to "bogus" will bounce
<========
> Jack Campin: 11 Third Street, Newtongrange, Midlothian EH22 4PU; 0131
6604760
> <http://www.FoundCollection.com/;  food intolerance data &
recipes,
> Mac logic fonts, Scots traditional music files and CD-ROMs of Scottish
music.

 
 
 

OT: student teaching in Europe

Post by KJ » Thu, 14 Oct 2004 22:35:21


Yes, that's correct Hanne.  It would be for her practice teaching under the
supervision of the classroom teacher.


Quote:
> But ... I undetstood that this is meant to be part of her teaching
> qualification. Like UK students at teacher training college spends time
> in schools.

> So someone at the school needs to work with the trainee teacher, but
> gets another pair of hands/ears in the classroom.

> That's what I thought Kathyl's DD was going to do??

> Hanne


> >>DD who is a senior music education major called home last night all
> >>e***d over the prospect of doing part of her student teaching next
> >>fall out of the US.  She said she wanted to put in a request for
> >>England, Scotland or Ireland.

> > I don't think any of them will recognize a US education qualification
for
> > teaching in schools, still less part of one.  Teaching qualifications
> > aren't even transferable between England and Scotland without retraining
> > to handle the different syllabuses.

> > Try the Scottish Education Department for the situation here.  But I'd
> > be very surprised if they'd let her near a school without several months
> > in a teacher training college first.

> > Music teaching is a bit different, but there is a huge oversupply and
> > most are part-time (touring several schools in a region) and insecure.

> > ========> Email to "j-c" at this site; email to "bogus" will bounce
<========
> > Jack Campin: 11 Third Street, Newtongrange, Midlothian EH22 4PU; 0131
6604760
> > <http://www.FoundCollection.com/;  food intolerance data &
recipes,
> > Mac logic fonts, Scots traditional music files and CD-ROMs of Scottish
music.

 
 
 

OT: student teaching in Europe

Post by KJ » Fri, 15 Oct 2004 02:35:05


Wouldn't the university department that arranges all this know to have the
background check done before placement?  This isn't a first time program for
student teaching.  She's not trying to get certified for teaching in a
foreign school system, just fulfill the qualifications for her degree here
at home.  They wouldn't have the foreign placement as an option if it didn't
fill the requirements.  It's good to hear all the possible difficulties
before the last minute.  Thanks!


Quote:

> > But ... I undetstood that this is meant to be part of her teaching
> > qualification. Like UK students at teacher training college spends time
> > in schools.

> Yes, arranged with specific schools months (and even on a year to year
> basis!) ahead of the teaching practice.  The college needs to supervise
> the student's teaching, and see a variety of lesson: who would be her
> college support?  And there may be a problem with her doing this as part
> of a foreign teaching qualification not recognised here in the UK.  It's
> well worth asking, but expect difficulties!

> > So someone at the school needs to work with the trainee teacher, but
> > gets another pair of hands/ears in the classroom.

> Doesn't quite work that way...

> Oh, and does she have a valid UK police check?  She won't get anywhere
> near kids without one!

> > That's what I thought Kathyl's DD was going to do??

> > Hanne


> >>> DD who is a senior music education major called home last night all
> >>> e***d over the prospect of doing part of her student teaching next
> >>> fall out of the US.  She said she wanted to put in a request for
> >>> England, Scotland or Ireland.

> >> I don't think any of them will recognize a US education qualification
for
> >> teaching in schools, still less part of one.  Teaching qualifications
> >> aren't even transferable between England and Scotland without
retraining
> >> to handle the different syllabuses.

> >> Try the Scottish Education Department for the situation here.  But I'd
> >> be very surprised if they'd let her near a school without several
months
> >> in a teacher training college first.

> >> Music teaching is a bit different, but there is a huge oversupply and
> >> most are part-time (touring several schools in a region) and insecure.

> >> ========> Email to "j-c" at this site; email to "bogus" will bounce
> >> <========
> >> Jack Campin: 11 Third Street, Newtongrange, Midlothian EH22 4PU; 0131
> >> 6604760
> >> <http://www.FoundCollection.com/;  food intolerance data &
> >> recipes,
> >> Mac logic fonts, Scots traditional music files and CD-ROMs of Scottish
> >> music.

> --
> Kate  XXXXXX
> Lady Catherine, Wardrobe *** of the Chocolate Buttons
> http://www.FoundCollection.com/
> Click on Kate's Pages and explore!

 
 
 

OT: student teaching in Europe

Post by Kate Dice » Fri, 15 Oct 2004 09:39:58


Quote:

> [ police clearance for people working with children ]

>>All this stuff was tightened up a lot (and not before time!) after
>>the Soham ***s, when two 10 YO girls were ***ed by their
>>school caretaker

> He wasn't.  He was a caretaker at another school, where the kids were
> the wrong age to appeal to him.  Job vetting was irrelevant, he didn't
> use his job to make contact with the kids he killed.

> The procedures haven't changed.  The people responsible for enforcing
> them have been told rather more forcibly to get it right, but there
> are still loopholes any sufficient smart psycho can exploit (which is
> as it should be, it is *not* worth turning the country into a police
> state in a fatuous attempt to stop such a tiny number of crimes).

You know what the really sad thing is?  All the form proves is that two
folk who can read and write can, between them, fill a form in.

But it's better than no form at all, and a lot more employers and
organisations working with kids are making them mandatory, AND making
the renewal every however often it is mandatory.  Prior to this, my last
one was done over 10 years ago!

--
Kate  XXXXXX
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe *** of the Chocolate Buttons
http://www.FoundCollection.com/
Click on Kate's Pages and explore!

 
 
 

OT: student teaching in Europe

Post by Hanne Gottliebse » Fri, 15 Oct 2004 01:27:31


Quote:

> Yes, arranged with specific schools months (and even on a year to year
> basis!) ahead of the teaching practice.  The college needs to supervise
> the student's teaching, and see a variety of lesson: who would be her
> college support?  And there may be a problem with her doing this as part
> of a foreign teaching qualification not recognised here in the UK.  It's
> well worth asking, but expect difficulties!

I guess since her school suggested it, one may hope they have their
contacts already set up.

Quote:
>> So someone at the school needs to work with the trainee teacher, but
>> gets another pair of hands/ears in the classroom.

> Doesn't quite work that way...

Yes, OK, I guess I oversimplified on that one.

Quote:
> Oh, and does she have a valid UK police check?  She won't get anywhere
> near kids without one!

In London at least those are local (I know I had one done this Summer to
work with under-16s in a Univeristy programme for secondary school
kids). So first one needs to know where one will be working, then there
is a county specific check (and two different counties would demand two
different forms filled in). However, the check does not take long at all
(as long as there is no mistaken identity issues or the like). Mine was
done in less than 3 weeks. I know 'cause I got a letter sent to my
homeaddress saying the info had been requested by Tower Hamlets (my work
county).

Hanne

 
 
 

OT: student teaching in Europe

Post by KJ » Fri, 15 Oct 2004 10:17:27


Hi Linda.
This is coordinated by the university that will give her the teaching
degree.  Actually Kazakhstan is one of the countries on the list.  If I
recall it's: England and Wales, Scotland, Ireland, New Zealand, Spain and a
couple others.  Interesting list really.  She has to go to some more
meetings to get more information.

--
Kathyl
remove "nospam-"  before mchsi
http://www.FoundCollection.com/


Quote:
> The only concern I would have would be whether this student teaching
> practicum would be recognize in the US by the State she wanted to
> teach in. Some states are very particular. I suspect that many might
> not recognize it.

> However, balance that against the experience of living abroad for a
> while. I know my daughter had a wonderful experience is both Russia
> and Kazakhstan.

> Linda
> PATCHogue, NY




Quote:
> >> DD who is a senior music education major called home last night all
e***d
> >> over the prospect of doing part of her student teaching next fall out
of the
> >> US.  She said she wanted to put in a request for England, Scotland or
> >> Ireland.  Have any of you had children who did this?  Have any of you
in
> >> those countries had student teachers from the U.S. in your schools?
What
> >> were your impressions of this experience?  Of course in the back of my
mind
> >> I'm thinking.....I know some quilters in those countries who could keep
an
> >> eye on her!  Or I could come visit her AND meet some online friends!
> >> Hummmmmmm.  I think she was surprised when I didn't look at her and
> >> say....are you kidding??
> >>  When she was in high school she went on a three week tour with a very
large
> >> concert band from the state that traveled through several European
countries
> >> and she's been trying to get back ever since.   This might be a good
way to
> >> do it.
> >> I'll be interested to hear what you all think.

> >> Kathyl
> >> remove "nospam-"  before mchsi
> >> http://www.FoundCollection.com/

 
 
 

OT: student teaching in Europe

Post by Kate Dice » Fri, 15 Oct 2004 06:42:58


Quote:

> In London at least those are local (I know I had one done this Summer to
> work with under-16s in a Univeristy programme for secondary school
> kids). So first one needs to know where one will be working, then there
> is a county specific check (and two different counties would demand two
> different forms filled in). However, the check does not take long at all
> (as long as there is no mistaken identity issues or the like). Mine was
> done in less than 3 weeks. I know 'cause I got a letter sent to my
> homeaddress saying the info had been requested by Tower Hamlets (my work
> county).

> Hanne

Outside London they are usually county specific, but if you move
counties and you have a current one, they accept it in the new place.
When mine was done we were told 12 weeks, but KCC had decided in its
infinite wisdom that every single person employed by the county who came
in contact with kids needed to have a new one done when the new 4 page
ones came out..  Yup, all 23 THOUSAND KCC employees and volunteers who
officially came in contact with kids (out of a total workforce of over
55 thousand)...  Librarians, to lollipop ladies, volunteer readers in
schools to sessional tutors with the KCU, police officers (!) to public
lavatory cleaners - the whole shebang!  And at 12 a throw, this is NOT
a cheap exercise.  On the other hand I never heard anything more
critical said about it than 'About time too!'

--
Kate  XXXXXX
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe *** of the Chocolate Buttons
http://www.FoundCollection.com/
Click on Kate's Pages and explore!

 
 
 

OT: student teaching in Europe

Post by Kate Dice » Fri, 15 Oct 2004 09:43:12


Quote:

> There are often ads in the Victorian Education Department Newspaper
> for Australian teachers togo and teach in England so it shouldn't be
> to hard to get some sort of prctical work

The Ozzy education system is closer to our own than that of the USA, so
it's easier to give them the booster training to get them used to what's
required here.  And we are very short of good teachers in some subject
areas.
--
Kate  XXXXXX
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe *** of the Chocolate Buttons
http://www.FoundCollection.com/
Click on Kate's Pages and explore!
 
 
 

OT: student teaching in Europe

Post by bogus addre » Fri, 15 Oct 2004 06:15:06


Quote:
>>>> DD who is a senior music education major called home last night all
>>>> e***d over the prospect of doing part of her student teaching next
>>>> fall out of the US.  She said she wanted to put in a request for
>>>> England, Scotland or Ireland.
>>> I don't think any of them will recognize a US education qualification for
>>> teaching in schools, still less part of one.  Teaching qualifications
>>> aren't even transferable between England and Scotland without retraining
>>> to handle the different syllabuses.
>> But ... I undetstood that this is meant to be part of her teaching
>> qualification. Like UK students at teacher training college spends
>> time in schools.

But UK students don't get near a school until they've done quite a lot
of curriculum-specific training.  And I'd expect that there will be some
teaching practices that are entirely standard one side of the pond and
grounds for instant dismissal on the other.

Quote:
> Oh, and does she have a valid UK police check?  She won't get anywhere
> near kids without one!

Don't underestimate how serious that one is.  It's going to be hard
to find American documentation that will persuade a Scottish or
English school that she's got a clean record - the approval process
("enhanced disclosure") is complicated and expensive enough even
when only one country's police records are involved.  (The process
doesn't work very well, and when it does work it can be completely
counterproductive; Thomas Hamilton was prevented from working with
kids on the grounds that he was a gun-obsessed paedophile weirdo, and
in retaliation shot a whole classroomful of kids and their teacher,
deaths which could probably have been avoided if the system hadn't
operated in such a black-and-white fashion).

I did a bit of recorder teaching in a school a few years ago (this
didn't have to fit any specific curriculum, I wrote my own), just
as all this paranoia got under way.  I could probably have gritted
my teeth and kept going through all the legal nonsense, but not when
the assistant head teacher changed and I had to work for somebody
who didn't really see why she should bother making so much as a
cupboard available for an oddball specialist to teach in.  Schools
(and entire authorities) vary a lot in their attitudes to music, it
can easily become a political football.

========> Email to "j-c" at this site; email to "bogus" will bounce <========
Jack Campin: 11 Third Street, Newtongrange, Midlothian EH22 4PU; 0131 6604760
<http://www.FoundCollection.com/;  food intolerance data & recipes,
Mac logic fonts, Scots traditional music files and CD-ROMs of Scottish music.

 
 
 

OT: student teaching in Europe

Post by Hann » Wed, 20 Oct 2004 03:03:05


Quote:

> I'll ask my aunt how it works (I need to call her anyway). But it sounds
> to me like she'd be a real asset to any school (or local school
> authority), and I'm sure she'd learn lots more too.

> Hanne

Excuse me for (1) replying so late and (2) replying to my own post.

I spoke with my Aunt who is a music teacher (instrumental - travels to
different school to give flute lessons to groups of 3 students or
solo) in England. This is what I understood from her:

To be a music teacher of the kind who does lessons with a whole class
at a time, you do the teaching qualification at a college, with a set
amount of time spent in schools with the local teacher(s) and your
college supporting you and checking on your progress. She is familiar
with this process as she did it not that long ago, before deciding to
stick with the flute lessons.

To teach your instrument (rather than the all-round of a teacher who
is employed to teach music in general in one school), you do a lot of
training too, but there is _no_ in-school training at all. None, nada,
nothing. Not even anyone sitting in on the lessons you are probably
already running with private students.

So, not knowing what DD here is doing (as in percussion or music in
general) it is a bit hard to be specific :-) Again, her school must
surely know.

Also, my Aunt was very surprised that my police check went through so
quickly, so I guess that is not the norm. However she did say that for
overseas folk, these requests routinely go through the embassies, and
that it is no big deal (except it takes time and has to be done), she
is Danish. The US embassy in London have some pretty rude people
manning the phone(s) for foreignors to call, but they've alwasy (in my
experience) been pretty quick on the paperwork. Of course, your
paperwork would go through the part dealing with Us citizen, but I'm
thinking that if the foreign paperwork is dealt with in a reasonable
timeframe, the US paperwork should be too.

Hope this helps, and let us know what happens. I certainly would be
happy to do some of the tour-guide stuff :-)

Hanne in London