advice regarding raw edge applique and durability

advice regarding raw edge applique and durability

Post by hellofroms » Thu, 19 Aug 2004 08:33:10



Hi there-
Thought I'd tap the collective knowledge of our group for some advice
about a quilt I'd like to make.  I'm looking at the pattern from the
cover of this book
http://images.amazon.com/images/P/1564775283.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg (Stich
and Split Applique) which I've recently purchased.  I would be making
it for my niece who is nine years old.  I'd like to make something
durable enough that she can have it for years to come.  I sappily
imagine her taking it to college with her :)  Anyhow, is raw edge
applique a mistake in this case?  Will it fray right away?  Should I
stick to regular piecing?

TIA for any thoughts.  

Sonya

http://community.webshots.com/user/hellofromsmd

 
 
 

advice regarding raw edge applique and durability

Post by The Brown Famil » Thu, 19 Aug 2004 09:21:56


I haven't tried it myself yet, but I'm glad you posted the name of that
book.  A lady in a quilt shop was showing it to me one day and I couldn't
remember the name of it.  Some great thing in there, I love the split houses
and the stars quilts.

Lorraine


Quote:
> Hi there-
> Thought I'd tap the collective knowledge of our group for some advice
> about a quilt I'd like to make.  I'm looking at the pattern from the
> cover of this book
> http://images.amazon.com/images/P/1564775283.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg (Stich
> and Split Applique) which I've recently purchased.  I would be making
> it for my niece who is nine years old.  I'd like to make something
> durable enough that she can have it for years to come.  I sappily
> imagine her taking it to college with her :)  Anyhow, is raw edge
> applique a mistake in this case?  Will it fray right away?  Should I
> stick to regular piecing?

> TIA for any thoughts.

> Sonya

> http://community.webshots.com/user/hellofromsmd


 
 
 

advice regarding raw edge applique and durability

Post by Julia Altshule » Thu, 19 Aug 2004 10:08:30


Quote:

> Hi there-
> Thought I'd tap the collective knowledge of our group for some advice
> about a quilt I'd like to make.  I'm looking at the pattern from the
> cover of this book
> http://images.amazon.com/images/P/1564775283.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg (Stich
> and Split Applique) which I've recently purchased.  I would be making
> it for my niece who is nine years old.  I'd like to make something
> durable enough that she can have it for years to come.  I sappily
> imagine her taking it to college with her :)  Anyhow, is raw edge
> applique a mistake in this case?  Will it fray right away?  Should I
> stick to regular piecing?

As you can imagine, I'm dying to know the answer to this one also.  I
think I could stand applique if I didn't have to sew down the edges.

--Lia

 
 
 

advice regarding raw edge applique and durability

Post by Patt » Thu, 19 Aug 2004 16:19:21


Hullo Sonya
I don't have any experience of long-term durability; but on your
question about 'fraying straight away': if you use one of the bonding
products, you remove that worry at least.
.


Quote:
>Hi there-
>Thought I'd tap the collective knowledge of our group for some advice
>about a quilt I'd like to make.  I'm looking at the pattern from the
>cover of this book
>http://images.amazon.com/images/P/1564775283.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg (Stich
>and Split Applique) which I've recently purchased.  I would be making
>it for my niece who is nine years old.  I'd like to make something
>durable enough that she can have it for years to come.  I sappily
>imagine her taking it to college with her :)  Anyhow, is raw edge
>applique a mistake in this case?  Will it fray right away?  Should I
>stick to regular piecing?

>TIA for any thoughts.

>Sonya

>http://community.webshots.com/user/hellofromsmd

--
Best Regards
pat on the hill
 
 
 

advice regarding raw edge applique and durability

Post by Packra » Thu, 19 Aug 2004 20:00:32


what I have heard from my quilt teacher is that as long as you use batiks
and a product such as vliesiline/wonderunder etc. there should be no
worries - you will need to sew 1/8" away from the edges to keep it in place
but that is all.

I am using this techniek to make my BOM ( Moondance by Beth Ferrier) this
year for the appliqu parts and I will be sewing the 1/8" when I quilt so
that you will see the shapes on the back of the quilt too :-) this will also
make the quilting easier as I will have half the quilt done when I've
finished sewing all of these lines/

HTH

--
8-)

Jessamy
In the Netherlands
http://www.geocities.com/jess_ayad/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Quote:
> Hi there-
> Thought I'd tap the collective knowledge of our group for some advice
> about a quilt I'd like to make.  I'm looking at the pattern from the
> cover of this book
> http://images.amazon.com/images/P/1564775283.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg (Stich
> and Split Applique) which I've recently purchased.  I would be making
> it for my niece who is nine years old.  I'd like to make something
> durable enough that she can have it for years to come.  I sappily
> imagine her taking it to college with her :)  Anyhow, is raw edge
> applique a mistake in this case?  Will it fray right away?  Should I
> stick to regular piecing?

> TIA for any thoughts.

> Sonya

> http://community.webshots.com/user/hellofromsmd

---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.737 / Virus Database: 491 - Release Date: 11-8-2004
 
 
 

advice regarding raw edge applique and durability

Post by Polly Esthe » Thu, 19 Aug 2004 21:47:15


I really, really do hate to rain on this thread but here goes. I made a
quilt for DD#2 of  about 150 different appliqud hearts. I seriously backed
them with iron-on interfacing. They are machine-stitched onto muslin with
two trips around. The first stitching was just a short straight stitch about
1/8" in from the cut edge.  The 2nd trip was something fancy such as the
double X that looks like cross-stitch but I also used every other pretty
stitch on the SM and lots of beautiful threads - gold, silk, rayon, and
cotton.The technique would have been fine for a wall*** but did not
survive really using and gentle laundering. The quilt is loved but is far
too fragile.  "Shabby" may be a trendy decorator sort of thing but it
certainly was not what I had in mind. Polly


Quote:
> what I have heard from my quilt teacher is that as long as you use batiks
> and a product such as vliesiline/wonderunder etc. there should be no
> worries - you will need to sew 1/8" away from the edges to keep it in
place
> but that is all.

> I am using this techniek to make my BOM ( Moondance by Beth Ferrier) this
> year for the appliqu parts and I will be sewing the 1/8" when I quilt so
> that you will see the shapes on the back of the quilt too :-) this will
also
> make the quilting easier as I will have half the quilt done when I've
> finished sewing all of these lines/

> HTH

> --
> 8-)

> Jessamy
> In the Netherlands
> http://www.FoundCollection.com/
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> > Hi there-
> > Thought I'd tap the collective knowledge of our group for some advice
> > about a quilt I'd like to make.  I'm looking at the pattern from the
> > cover of this book
> > http://www.FoundCollection.com/(Stich
> > and Split Applique) which I've recently purchased.  I would be making
> > it for my niece who is nine years old.  I'd like to make something
> > durable enough that she can have it for years to come.  I sappily
> > imagine her taking it to college with her :)  Anyhow, is raw edge
> > applique a mistake in this case?  Will it fray right away?  Should I
> > stick to regular piecing?

> > TIA for any thoughts.

> > Sonya

> > http://www.FoundCollection.com/

> ---
> Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
> Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.FoundCollection.com/).
> Version: 6.0.737 / Virus Database: 491 - Release Date: 11-8-2004

 
 
 

advice regarding raw edge applique and durability

Post by The Brown Famil » Thu, 19 Aug 2004 22:13:39


I thought the idea of this type of appliqu is that you do want the edges to
fray!

Lorraine



Quote:
> I haven't tried it myself yet, but I'm glad you posted the name of that
> book.  A lady in a quilt shop was showing it to me one day and I couldn't
> remember the name of it.  Some great thing in there, I love the split
houses
> and the stars quilts.

> Lorraine



> > Hi there-
> > Thought I'd tap the collective knowledge of our group for some advice
> > about a quilt I'd like to make.  I'm looking at the pattern from the
> > cover of this book
> > http://images.amazon.com/images/P/1564775283.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg (Stich
> > and Split Applique) which I've recently purchased.  I would be making
> > it for my niece who is nine years old.  I'd like to make something
> > durable enough that she can have it for years to come.  I sappily
> > imagine her taking it to college with her :)  Anyhow, is raw edge
> > applique a mistake in this case?  Will it fray right away?  Should I
> > stick to regular piecing?

> > TIA for any thoughts.

> > Sonya

> > http://community.webshots.com/user/hellofromsmd

 
 
 

advice regarding raw edge applique and durability

Post by Diana Curti » Thu, 19 Aug 2004 22:34:41


Enclosing the raw edges with satin stitch or a close zig zag will keep the
edges from raveling. It takes a bit longer than leaving them loose but they
do hold up with time.
Diana


Quote:
> I really, really do hate to rain on this thread but here goes. I made a
> quilt for DD#2 of  about 150 different appliqud hearts. I seriously
backed
> them with iron-on interfacing. They are machine-stitched onto muslin with
> two trips around. The first stitching was just a short straight stitch
about
> 1/8" in from the cut edge.  The 2nd trip was something fancy such as the
> double X that looks like cross-stitch but I also used every other pretty
> stitch on the SM and lots of beautiful threads - gold, silk, rayon, and
> cotton.The technique would have been fine for a wall*** but did not
> survive really using and gentle laundering. The quilt is loved but is far
> too fragile.  "Shabby" may be a trendy decorator sort of thing but it
> certainly was not what I had in mind. Polly



> > what I have heard from my quilt teacher is that as long as you use
batiks
> > and a product such as vliesiline/wonderunder etc. there should be no
> > worries - you will need to sew 1/8" away from the edges to keep it in
> place
> > but that is all.

> > I am using this techniek to make my BOM ( Moondance by Beth Ferrier)
this
> > year for the appliqu parts and I will be sewing the 1/8" when I quilt
so
> > that you will see the shapes on the back of the quilt too :-) this will
> also
> > make the quilting easier as I will have half the quilt done when I've
> > finished sewing all of these lines/

> > HTH

> > --
> > 8-)

> > Jessamy
> > In the Netherlands
> > http://www.FoundCollection.com/
> > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> > > Hi there-
> > > Thought I'd tap the collective knowledge of our group for some advice
> > > about a quilt I'd like to make.  I'm looking at the pattern from the
> > > cover of this book
> > > http://www.FoundCollection.com/(Stich
> > > and Split Applique) which I've recently purchased.  I would be making
> > > it for my niece who is nine years old.  I'd like to make something
> > > durable enough that she can have it for years to come.  I sappily
> > > imagine her taking it to college with her :)  Anyhow, is raw edge
> > > applique a mistake in this case?  Will it fray right away?  Should I
> > > stick to regular piecing?

> > > TIA for any thoughts.

> > > Sonya

> > > http://www.FoundCollection.com/

> > ---
> > Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
> > Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.FoundCollection.com/).
> > Version: 6.0.737 / Virus Database: 491 - Release Date: 11-8-2004

 
 
 

advice regarding raw edge applique and durability

Post by hellofroms » Thu, 19 Aug 2004 23:37:46


I'm glad you posted Lorraine because I saw your question some weeks
ago and thought this might be the book you were looking for.  I
couldn't find your original post by then though.  There are really
lovely ideas in the book.


Quote:
> I haven't tried it myself yet, but I'm glad you posted the name of that
> book.  A lady in a quilt shop was showing it to me one day and I couldn't
> remember the name of it.  Some great thing in there, I love the split houses
> and the stars quilts.

> Lorraine

 
 
 

advice regarding raw edge applique and durability

Post by hellofroms » Thu, 19 Aug 2004 23:42:24


Thank you for the ideas and input!

Hum, the directions don't actually call for any type of fusing...
only sewing 1/4" from raw edge when assembling top and then "just
outside" shape when quilting.

Looking a little more closely I see that none of the patterns are
shown in bed quilt sizes, just wall***s.

--Sonya

 
 
 

advice regarding raw edge applique and durability

Post by Julia Altshule » Fri, 20 Aug 2004 08:31:01


Quote:

> Enclosing the raw edges with satin stitch or a close zig zag will keep the
> edges from raveling. It takes a bit longer than leaving them loose but they
> do hold up with time.
> Diana

My experience with satin stitch or any zigzag is that it distorts the
background fabric.  When I zigzag when quilting, the quilt no longer
lies flat.  When I zigzag to applique, the background fabric gets drawn
up in ripples.  I've heard that stablizers help.  I haven't tried them.

--Lia

 
 
 

advice regarding raw edge applique and durability

Post by Diana Curti » Fri, 20 Aug 2004 08:46:52


I use a piece of computer paper under the background fabric. With the
tension set right and a little practice there is no rippling. Try starching
the background too?
I like machine applique for some projects. Ive been doing it before computer
paper was available. We had to make do with typewriter paper. ;-) We didnt
have fusibles either. Thats ok, I dont like fusibles much.
Diana


Quote:

> > Enclosing the raw edges with satin stitch or a close zig zag will keep
the
> > edges from raveling. It takes a bit longer than leaving them loose but
they
> > do hold up with time.
> > Diana

> My experience with satin stitch or any zigzag is that it distorts the
> background fabric.  When I zigzag when quilting, the quilt no longer
> lies flat.  When I zigzag to applique, the background fabric gets drawn
> up in ripples.  I've heard that stablizers help.  I haven't tried them.

> --Lia

 
 
 

advice regarding raw edge applique and durability

Post by KJ » Fri, 20 Aug 2004 09:17:53


Yup, stabilizers are a must for satin stitch appliqu.  Tear Away is my
favorite.  If you use an open zig zag you can probably get along with
heavily starching the back ground.  Sometimes the tearaway is difficult to
remove when doing an open zig zag....it stresses the stitches.


Quote:

> > Enclosing the raw edges with satin stitch or a close zig zag will keep
the
> > edges from raveling. It takes a bit longer than leaving them loose but
they
> > do hold up with time.
> > Diana

> My experience with satin stitch or any zigzag is that it distorts the
> background fabric.  When I zigzag when quilting, the quilt no longer
> lies flat.  When I zigzag to applique, the background fabric gets drawn
> up in ripples.  I've heard that stablizers help.  I haven't tried them.

> --Lia

 
 
 

advice regarding raw edge applique and durability

Post by Don/Ge » Fri, 20 Aug 2004 09:47:22


You definitely need a stabilizer.  Set the tension a little looser to
prevent "tunneling"  If you stabilize the fabric the background won't
distort.
Gen


Quote:
> My experience with satin stitch or any zigzag is that it distorts the
> background fabric.  When I zigzag when quilting, the quilt no longer
> lies flat.  When I zigzag to applique, the background fabric gets drawn
> up in ripples.  I've heard that stablizers help.  I haven't tried them.

> --Lia

 
 
 

advice regarding raw edge applique and durability

Post by Don/Ge » Fri, 20 Aug 2004 09:48:54


With this technique, you want the edges to fray.  Just another technique.
Gen


Quote:
> Thank you for the ideas and input!

> Hum, the directions don't actually call for any type of fusing...
> only sewing 1/4" from raw edge when assembling top and then "just
> outside" shape when quilting.

> Looking a little more closely I see that none of the patterns are
> shown in bed quilt sizes, just wall***s.

> --Sonya