OT(?) : PMC Class report (long)

OT(?) : PMC Class report (long)

Post by KDK » Tue, 26 Aug 2003 15:12:26



Well I'm down to 682 posts to read :)

And I did make hollow beads in the class so maybe it is on topic :)

I loved my PMC level I Class.  It was taught by Mary Ann & Ken Devos (we
used their book in class) and they were wonderful!  Mary Ann is incredibly
creative - most of her demos she would just decide on the fly what the look
of the piece would be.  I would highly recommend the Devos as teachers to
anyone interested in PMC.

I'm now a certified PMC I person.  We had to make 8 official projects to be
certified, but we also had time to make others.  It was great to have 4 1/2
days to work instead of the usual 3 days for a  certification class.  I now
plan to take the Level II class in either September or October.

There were 13 people in our class and everyone was very supportive of each
other and all were talented too!  Y'all would be proud of me- I had to pass
on some RCB wisdom- each time someone would compliment someone else's work
almost always the creator would say negative things- it's not really good,
you're just saying that, etc. (even the male student).  So I told them that
the PROPER response was "Thank-you - I've worked very hard ....."  or just
"Thank-you".  And so many were of the "perfectionist" type (I used to be as
well).  Most were trying PMC for the 1st time- and would be all grumpy
(momentarily) if the end product didn't match their "ideal" in their head.
I think we got through to some of them:)  Mary Ann and Ken were also very
supportive - and as they said, with PMC you can keep working on it until
it's the way you want it!

Several of the people in the class also had experience in jewelry designing,
beadmaking, facetting, wirework, silversmithing, etc so it was nice to get a
little education on all of these areas.  I also picked up a lot of advice
and info about selling work, displays, etc.

I also got invited to a private lesson (4 hours) on wire wrapping that some
of the other students arranged.  I knew nothing about wire wrapping and the
instructor (Lisa Roberts) was very patient with me!  I learned how to make a
necklace that is very easy to make and looks pretty cool.

And of course I got to shop- bought PMC stuff, CZs, some rocks (it was a
workshop sponsored by the Southeast Federation of Mineralogical Societies),
a raku vase (bought at the auction) and a bunch of dichroic cabs (they were
selling for 3.00 each!!!!)

The class was held at Wildacres Retreat near Little Switzerland NC.  It is
in a gorgeous setting - lots of views, trees, etc.  However there are lots
and lots of steps and hills- and there were people who had some problems
with that.  For most of us it was just a lot of good exercise :)

And in case you are interested - here is the link to the pics of the pieces
I did.  I love the color effects you can get with the liver of sulfur.  Some
of the  pieces still need some polishing etc.  I'll be experimenting more
with PMC and will post pics as I work.

And I made two memory wire chokers while I was there - I'll post those later
(have to find them)

http://community.webshots.com/album/87271606WbeGQP

Kathy K - who now has 2 new loves - lampworking and PMC!!

 
 
 

OT(?) : PMC Class report (long)

Post by KDK » Tue, 26 Aug 2003 15:14:06


oops - forgot the link to the wire necklace

http://community.webshots.com/photo/75434087/87272116mPyTlx

 
 
 

OT(?) : PMC Class report (long)

Post by S. Burwas » Wed, 27 Aug 2003 01:32:21



Quote:

> Well I'm down to 682 posts to read :)

> And I did make hollow beads in the class so maybe it is on topic :)

> I loved my PMC level I Class.  It was taught by Mary Ann & Ken Devos (we
> used their book in class) and they were wonderful!  Mary Ann is incredibly
> creative - most of her demos she would just decide on the fly what the look
> of the piece would be.  I would highly recommend the Devos as teachers to
> anyone interested in PMC.

snipped FBW
> http://community.webshots.com/album/87271606WbeGQP

> Kathy K - who now has 2 new loves - lampworking and PMC!!

Very cool - sounds like you had fun and looks like you made some very
cool things. What core material(s) did you use for your hollow beads?

Susan in Canada

 
 
 

OT(?) : PMC Class report (long)

Post by KDK » Wed, 27 Aug 2003 01:53:35


Thanks - it was a blast.

We used cork clay as the form.  You can also use paper clay  and a paper
machaie (sp!) type material.

Kathy K

Quote:
> Very cool - sounds like you had fun and looks like you made some very
> cool things. What core material(s) did you use for your hollow beads?

> Susan in Canada

 
 
 

OT(?) : PMC Class report (long)

Post by Deirdre S » Thu, 28 Aug 2003 02:12:49


Wow! I'm especially sent by the pendants, and the syringe-fillagree
work, but it is all nifty.

Deirdre



Quote:
>http://community.webshots.com/album/87271606WbeGQP

>Kathy K - who now has 2 new loves - lampworking and PMC!!

 
 
 

OT(?) : PMC Class report (long)

Post by KDK » Fri, 29 Aug 2003 11:20:41


Thanks!  I think I like doing pendants the most.  The ring looks better in
person - it has a texture on it that won't show up on the scan.

Kathy K

Quote:
> Wow! I'm especially sent by the pendants, and the syringe-fillagree
> work, but it is all nifty.

> Deirdre

 
 
 

OT(?) : PMC Class report (long)

Post by Christina Peterso » Fri, 29 Aug 2003 14:17:35


Are the leaves in the last picture from painting paste on the backs of of
real leaves?  And did you also paint paste onto the cork armature beads?  I
liked using the paste.  Probably because the clay balls got dry and cracked
so fast here.  Especially in the winter.  Extreme low humidity -- lower than
Arizona deserts.

It just occurred to me the other day that I'd better pick and paste some
leaves real soon.  Already the leaves here are turning gold and our first
frost could come any day.

Tina


Quote:
> Thanks!  I think I like doing pendants the most.  The ring looks better in
> person - it has a texture on it that won't show up on the scan.

> Kathy K


> > Wow! I'm especially sent by the pendants, and the syringe-fillagree
> > work, but it is all nifty.

> > Deirdre

 
 
 

OT(?) : PMC Class report (long)

Post by KDK » Fri, 29 Aug 2003 14:39:25


Yes the leaves and the freeform thingy (wet origami paper wadded up and then
coated it many times) and the cork clay forms were made using the paste.
I like the paste as well - I like to put paint on things!

I need to scour my yard for some new leaves.

Good luck with your leaves  I probably have until some time in Oct before
fear of frost hits.

Oh- and supposedly you can make a mold of a *** stamp - you put powder on
the stamp to keep it from sticking.  I haven't tried this yet - I'll report
the results when I do.

Kathy K


Quote:
> Are the leaves in the last picture from painting paste on the backs of of
> real leaves?  And did you also paint paste onto the cork armature beads?
I
> liked using the paste.  Probably because the clay balls got dry and
cracked
> so fast here.  Especially in the winter.  Extreme low humidity -- lower
than
> Arizona deserts.

> It just occurred to me the other day that I'd better pick and paste some
> leaves real soon.  Already the leaves here are turning gold and our first
> frost could come any day.

> Tina

 
 
 

OT(?) : PMC Class report (long)

Post by Dr. So » Fri, 29 Aug 2003 14:44:32


Quote:
>Oh- and supposedly you can make a mold of a *** stamp - you put powder on
>the stamp to keep it from sticking.  I haven't tried this yet - I'll report
>the results when I do.

Do this with a stamp you don't particularly care about the first time.  If it
works, you can feel safe about the stamps you DO like.  Because usually, the
molding material will bond to the stamp -- with no chance of extrication
whatsoever.
~~
Sooz
-------
"Those in the cheaper seats clap. The rest of you rattle your jewelry." John
Lennon (1940 - 1980) Royal Varieties Performance
~ Dr. Sooz's Bead Links
http://www.FoundCollection.com/
 
 
 

OT(?) : PMC Class report (long)

Post by KDK » Fri, 29 Aug 2003 14:55:07


Yeah that is what I was thinking.  I'll have to check my stamps and see if I
have anything I'm not crazy about!

Kathy K


Quote:
> >Oh- and supposedly you can make a mold of a *** stamp - you put powder
on
> >the stamp to keep it from sticking.  I haven't tried this yet - I'll
report
> >the results when I do.

> Do this with a stamp you don't particularly care about the first time.  If
it
> works, you can feel safe about the stamps you DO like.  Because usually,
the
> molding material will bond to the stamp -- with no chance of extrication
> whatsoever.
> ~~
> Sooz
> -------
> "Those in the cheaper seats clap. The rest of you rattle your jewelry."
John
> Lennon (1940 - 1980) Royal Varieties Performance
> ~ Dr. Sooz's Bead Links
> http://www.FoundCollection.com/

 
 
 

OT(?) : PMC Class report (long)

Post by KDK » Fri, 29 Aug 2003 14:55:32


The voice of experience?

Any tips??

Kathy K


Quote:

> :

> ]Oh- and supposedly you can make a mold of a *** stamp - you put powder
on
> ]the stamp to keep it from sticking.  I haven't tried this yet - I'll
report
> ]the results when I do.

> yes, you can.
> the process is tricky, but once you get the hang of it, it can be
> impressive!

> -----------

> (Books) http://www.FoundCollection.com/
> (Jewelry) http://www.FoundCollection.com/
> -----------
> It's not what you take, when you leave this world behind you;
> it's what you leave behind you when you go.  -- Randy Travis

 
 
 

OT(?) : PMC Class report (long)

Post by Christina Peterso » Fri, 29 Aug 2003 16:11:11


This is what I heard too.  Better to get a brass plate and put olive oil or
Badger Balm onit.  Or make a mold from that***like stuff.

Tina


Quote:

> :

> ]Oh- and supposedly you can make a mold of a *** stamp - you put powder
on
> ]the stamp to keep it from sticking.  I haven't tried this yet - I'll
report
> ]the results when I do.

> yes, you can.
> the process is tricky, but once you get the hang of it, it can be
> impressive!

> -----------

> (Books) http://www.FoundCollection.com/
> (Jewelry) http://www.FoundCollection.com/
> -----------
> It's not what you take, when you leave this world behind you;
> it's what you leave behind you when you go.  -- Randy Travis

 
 
 

OT(?) : PMC Class report (long)

Post by Deirdre S » Sat, 30 Aug 2003 01:23:56


Ooooo... if you ever get that techniques to work on the dingbats, let
me know.

Deirdre

Quote:

>dad had some "dingbats" that would have worked really well that way.

 
 
 

OT(?) : PMC Class report (long)

Post by Karin Cerni » Sat, 30 Aug 2003 02:29:55


Use some embossing ink on the stamp, that will act as a release.

Karin

Quote:


> Sooz) :

> ]>Oh- and supposedly you can make a mold of a *** stamp - you put powder on
> ]>the stamp to keep it from sticking.  I haven't tried this yet - I'll report
> ]>the results when I do.
> ]
> ]Do this with a stamp you don't particularly care about the first time.  If it
> ]works, you can feel safe about the stamps you DO like.  Because usually, the
> ]molding material will bond to the stamp -- with no chance of extrication
> ]whatsoever.

> there was something you could spray on the stamp first, so it wouldn't
> stick.  PAM?  something rather oily.  yes, practice with "cheap"
> stamps first, but i know it can work.

> -----------

> (Books) http://www.FoundCollection.com/
> (Jewelry) http://www.FoundCollection.com/
> -----------
> It's not what you take, when you leave this world behind you;
> it's what you leave behind you when you go.  -- Randy Travis

 
 
 

OT(?) : PMC Class report (long)

Post by Dr. So » Sat, 30 Aug 2003 03:12:23


Hey, that's good.  

Quote:
>Use some embossing ink on the stamp, that will act as a release.

~~
Sooz
-------
"Those in the cheaper seats clap. The rest of you rattle your jewelry." John
Lennon (1940 - 1980) Royal Varieties Performance
~ Dr. Sooz's Bead Links
http://airandearth.netfirms.com/soozlinkslist.html