seed beads

seed beads

Post by Jodd » Mon, 25 Sep 2000 04:00:00



I'm new to beading - just started this summer working mostly with seed beads.
The question I have is how to keep some of the bottom dangles from earrings
from loosening.  I've had this happen on several earrings.  Any suggestions?
Jody from Memphis
 
 
 

seed beads

Post by BeadR De » Mon, 25 Sep 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

> I'm new to beading - just started this summer working mostly with seed beads.
> The question I have is how to keep some of the bottom dangles from earrings
> from loosening.  I've had this happen on several earrings.  Any suggestions?
> Jody from Memphis

Are you talking about threaded fringes, or headpin dangles?  If fringes,
you probably aren't pre-stretching your thread before you use it.  If
you're using headpins, you have to work harden your loops before you
attach them to the earring.  Let me know which method, and we can
elaborate.
--
---------------------------------------

Denise W.  whose home page is at
http://www.angelfire.com/mi2/riverbend/
"The problem with people who have no vices. . . they're going to have
some pretty annoying virtues."  Liz Taylor

 
 
 

seed beads

Post by Richard Hartun » Mon, 25 Sep 2000 04:00:00


Quote:


> > I'm new to beading - just started this summer working mostly with seed beads.
> > The question I have is how to keep some of the bottom dangles from earrings
> > from loosening.  I've had this happen on several earrings.  Any suggestions?
> > Jody from Memphis

> Are you talking about threaded fringes, or headpin dangles?  If fringes,
> you probably aren't pre-stretching your thread before you use it.  If
> you're using headpins, you have to work harden your loops before you
> attach them to the earring.  Let me know which method, and we can
> elaborate.
> --
> ---------------------------------------

> Denise W.  whose home page is at
> http://www.angelfire.com/mi2/riverbend/
> "The problem with people who have no vices. . . they're going to have
> some pretty annoying virtues."  Liz Taylor

I have just recently stumbled across this group, it's great to see that so many
people share my love of beads.  After reading 700+ messages, the mention of work
hardening the loops for headpin dangles caught my attention and I would appreciate
it if you would elaborate on this subject.  Thank You.  And again I can't express
enough how great it is to see so many people helping each other.
 
 
 

seed beads

Post by Kayt » Tue, 26 Sep 2000 12:23:12


Quote:
>hardening the loops for headpin dangles<

An easy way--- set them on an "anvil" (practically anything hard, actually) and
whack them (the loops) with a hammer.....
You can also whack the whole pin (before the beads are put on, of course).
If the pins are coated/plated, use a ***, rawhidw or nylon-head hammer.

The above works for silver, at least. Most pre-made base metal headpins are
already "half-hard" or more; in my experience, Artistic Wire isn't much
affected by hammering.
Kaytee

 
 
 

seed beads

Post by BeadR De » Tue, 26 Sep 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

> I have just recently stumbled across this group, it's great to see that so many
> people share my love of beads.  After reading 700+ messages, the mention of work
> hardening the loops for headpin dangles caught my attention and I would appreciate
> it if you would elaborate on this subject.  Thank You.  And again I can't express
> enough how great it is to see so many people helping each other.

If you don't want to hammer them, after making your loops, you can bend
them forward, back, forward, back, then closed.  Don't work them too
much, or they'll break.  Also, this is for solid metal pins only
(plating will crumble off...why I never use plated pins.)
If you do hammer the pins, use a light touch, and you will need a few
extra tools...a small metal bench block and a smooth-faced jewelers
hammer.  
--
---------------------------------------

Denise W.  whose home page is at
http://www.angelfire.com/mi2/riverbend/
"The problem with people who have no vices. . . they're going to have
some pretty annoying virtues."  Liz Taylor

 
 
 

seed beads

Post by Roxan O,Brie » Wed, 27 Sep 2000 04:00:00


First I think you are talking about the dangles that have beads*** from
them, not metal attachments. You may not be putting enough tension on the
thread when doing the dangles and you may be using too long of a piece of
thread which wears thin at the end of a project, so use shorter thread and
add new thread as needed. You also didn't mention what type of thread you
were using. I use nymo 00 thread if you are using the wrong type of thread
that also could be adding to your problem. You will get better as you go
when you learn to use good bead, thread and the right tension of a project.
Don't get discouraged know that it is a learning experience. Now second,
there is two ways to approach the problem of metal findings that need
hardening. You can tumble the findings in a tumbler and watch for hardness
or carefully hammer to hardening before using them in a project which can
mar your piece. I hope this helps to answer your question.
Roxan in Pa.

Quote:
> I'm new to beading - just started this summer working mostly with seed
beads.
> The question I have is how to keep some of the bottom dangles from
earrings
> from loosening.  I've had this happen on several earrings.  Any
suggestions?
> Jody from Memphis

 
 
 

seed beads

Post by Richard Hartun » Wed, 04 Oct 2000 04:00:00


Quote:


> > I have just recently stumbled across this group, it's great to see that so many
> > people share my love of beads.  After reading 700+ messages, the mention of work
> > hardening the loops for headpin dangles caught my attention and I would appreciate
> > it if you would elaborate on this subject.  Thank You.  And again I can't express
> > enough how great it is to see so many people helping each other.

> If you don't want to hammer them, after making your loops, you can bend
> them forward, back, forward, back, then closed.  Don't work them too
> much, or they'll break.  Also, this is for solid metal pins only
> (plating will crumble off...why I never use plated pins.)
> If you do hammer the pins, use a light touch, and you will need a few
> extra tools...a small metal bench block and a smooth-faced jewelers
> hammer.
> --
> ---------------------------------------

> Denise W.  whose home page is at
> http://www.angelfire.com/mi2/riverbend/
> "The problem with people who have no vices. . . they're going to have
> some pretty annoying virtues."  Liz Taylor

Thanks for the feedback now I now what to call it when I whack a piece of wire to make
it tougher.  Sounds different when I actually have a term to call it "work hardening."
Blue