museum exhibits and the paint they use

museum exhibits and the paint they use

Post by tim brimelo » Sun, 19 May 2002 10:37:32



I was reading the thread about the Canadian Me163 which reminded me of the
time I wa at the Australian War Museum in Canberra.  On show are several
Allied WWII planes, a Zero and a Me163.  I asked the curator who was
conducting a tour what paint do they use in restoration and the answer was
DULUX!  The very same stuff we paint our house with.

They do a really good job but when I heard this I couldn't believe it.  I
was expecting something like "we contacted a major aeroplane paint supplier"
or "we use a large tin of Humbrol <g>" but Dulux 101....

Tim Brimelow

 
 
 

museum exhibits and the paint they use

Post by <shun.. » Sun, 19 May 2002 16:06:23



Quote:
> I was reading the thread about the Canadian Me163 which reminded me of the
> time I wa at the Australian War Museum in Canberra.  On show are several
> Allied WWII planes, a Zero and a Me163.  I asked the curator who was
> conducting a tour what paint do they use in restoration and the answer was
> DULUX!  The very same stuff we paint our house with.

> They do a really good job but when I heard this I couldn't believe it.  I
> was expecting something like "we contacted a major aeroplane paint
supplier"
> or "we use a large tin of Humbrol <g>" but Dulux 101....

> Tim Brimelow

It isn't all that surprising.  For a museum the main considerations are
getting a correct color match, ease of application, safety, how long it will
last before you have to redo it, and above all cost.  Consider that at Pima
where I work it costs us between $5,000 and $10,000 to paint a medium size
aircraft, even with the cheaper paint.  A paint job only lasts between 7 and
10 years outside, you can stretch that a few years with certain paint
additives and UV coatings, but only by 3 or 4 years.   Aircraft displayed
inside last pretty much forever, of course.  Using that kind of paint also
keeps OSHA and the EPA happy.  It is safer for the people doing the painting
and for the environment.  And we all like to keep government agencies happy,
don't we?  :-)  Matching colors is fairly easy, any good paint supplier can
do it, usually with what they have on hand too.  If you have a good paint
crew, nobody can tell the difference, unless they ask.

James Stemm