Panel Line Scribing - Help Needed

Panel Line Scribing - Help Needed

Post by Chris Dougla » Thu, 13 Jul 1995 04:00:00



Quote:

>...I have practiced and preaciced - I call it practice because I
>have screwed up a couple of kits trying to scribe panel lines. Maybe I
>shouldn"t have several *** beverages before I start scribing. Thank God
>that they were inexpensive ones...

Well now, there's your problem.  When you're going to be scribing panel lines,
never, NEVER skimp on the *** beverages.

--Chris Douglas

 
 
 

Panel Line Scribing - Help Needed

Post by LarryM4 » Thu, 13 Jul 1995 04:00:00


I've decided to enter, after building up my courage with several ***
beverages, the wondeful and exciting facit of this hobby - scribing panel
lines. I currently have a panel scriber from Bare Metal Foil Co. that
looks as if it is an implement of torture from the dentist's office
(probably is for all I know). The scriber has good balance, I think, but
I'm getting, in my opinion, less that acceptable reuslts. Varying line
depth etc. I have practiced and preaciced - I call it practice because I
have screwed up a couple of kits trying to scribe panel lines. Maybe I
shouldn"t have several *** beverages before I start scribing. Thank God
that they were inexpensive ones. I'm sure that part of the problem is that
I haven't developed the correct pressure control on the tool. However, due
to my lack of success and continually increasing frustration, I am asking
you all for help.

What is the best straight edge to use? I have heard to use Dymo Label tape
or a flat vacuum cleaned belt. I have tried label tape with limited
success, sometimes the scriber cuts into the tape - not good for making
straight lines.

What is the best technique for scribing around curves?

Is it best to scribe accross seam lins before or after the fuselage or
wing halfs have been assembled?

How do you keep from getting panel lines that look like they were made
with a Ditch Witch?

What is the best method of fixing a screwup? Filler putty or CA? Or some
other method? I have tried putty, but all that happens is that I end up
chipping out the putty.

Is there a better scriber to use? Some people that I have talked to like
the Tamiya scriber. I'm sure that this is one of those personal preferance
questions but I'd still like to hear your opinions.

If there is anything that I may have left out let me know.

TIA for your help.

Larry

 
 
 

Panel Line Scribing - Help Needed

Post by Patrick Germa » Fri, 14 Jul 1995 04:00:00


The more pressure you apply, the less control you have
when using the Bare Metal Foil scriber (I presume the ones
from Squadron and Tamiya are very similar).  I think you are
using the right tools for scribing.  When I started, I had
a tendency to apply too much pressure.  I was using the
scriber more like a dagger.  When I ease off (read when I am
not in a bad mood), I tend to make less mistakes and the panel
lines starts to look much better.  After the paint job, panel
lines too deep show up as trenches.  I use CA to recover from
mistake (less and less nowadays).

Sigh, if scribing panel lines doesn't work for you and you
think you tried hard enough, maybe it's time to give up.
It's like golf probably.  There are tons of models on the
market with panel lines already on, it may be a waste of time
to scribe them, unless you really get a kick out of doing this.

Patrick

 
 
 

Panel Line Scribing - Help Needed

Post by David S. Geldmach » Fri, 14 Jul 1995 04:00:00



[snip]

Quote:
> Maybe I
>shouldn"t have several *** beverages before I start scribing. Thank God
>that they were inexpensive ones.

There's your problem, Larry.  Buy the good, expensive, *** beverages.
Actually, from the neurologic perspective, even small amounts of the
short-chain hydroxylated hydrocarbons contained in *** beverages will
impair motor control and coordination at the kinds of tolerances
we're talking about for 1/72 (and probably 1/48 also).  Another ***
beverage which can cause problems is coffee, again even small doses can
produce a very fine tremor which can make applying consistent cutting
pressure difficult.  There are large individual differences in these
responses, but the average is reflected above.

Quote:
>What is the best method of fixing a screwup? Filler putty or CA? Or some
>other method? I have tried putty, but all that happens is that I end up
>chipping out the putty.

I use CA.  My usual putty is the Squadron White.  Neither it nor Green can
be scribed well - at least by me.

Quote:

>Is there a better scriber to use? Some people that I have talked to like
>the Tamiya scriber. I'm sure that this is one of those personal preferance
>questions but I'd still like to hear your opinions.

Prior to the V-cut panel line scribers, the _back_ of a No.11 blade or one
of those carbide or diamond metal scribers from the sheet metal world were
recommended implements.  They leave more of a lip, which will need to be
sanded, but will be less likely to cut into your guide.

Quote:
>If there is anything that I may have left out let me know.

Probably just more practice.  Buy something you don't have an undying
affection for off the clearance rack or one of the $1.99 bagged wonders
from the Squadron Flier and scribe it to your heart's content.  Then use
it for testing your paint mixes - or give it to the kids to destroy.
(My ancient Hasegawa A-4 takes regular SAM hits from my 5-year-old
in the tub - he loves it when the wings separate from the fuselage).

Good Luck - and HAVE FUN! (BTW, it really is _fun_ for me to speculate on
how a Blackbird should look).  :)

David
--

Department of Neurology                         voice:  216-844-8203
Case Western Reserve University                 fax:    216-844-7239
Cleveland, Ohio  44106  USA

 
 
 

Panel Line Scribing - Help Needed

Post by SALT » Fri, 14 Jul 1995 04:00:00


I've used this tool for a long time and have made several for my friends.
You'll need a # 11 X-acto blade and a drimel tool.  Put the cutting discs
in the drimel tool.  These cutting discs are the breakable type.  Next
secure thr blade in a vice with the edge up.  take the dremel tool and cut
notches in the blade.  Wear eye protection.  The notches should start at
the tip and be spaced about the width of the disc apart.  This tool can be
used freehand on curved surfaces.  The following diagram is not perfect
but will give the general idea.

          _   _    _    _   _    _
     _ _|  |_|  |_|  |_|  |_|  |_|  |_|\
    \                                      \---------|
     \-----------------------------------------------|

The first tooth shuold be recessed from the tip.

Steve

 
 
 

Panel Line Scribing - Help Needed

Post by MaddMat1 » Sat, 15 Jul 1995 04:00:00


Quote:
>What is the best straight edge to use? I have heard to use Dymo Label
tape
>or a flat vacuum cleaned belt. I have tried label tape with limited
>success, sometimes the scriber cuts into the tape - not good for making
>straight lines.

Eraser shields from the art supply store are dandy. Some Japanese
manufacturer
made a dandy photoetched access-panel scribing guide from brass, but it
has disappeared on my workbench somewhere. Highly recommended.
(Trimaster?)

Quote:
>What is the best technique for scribing around curves?

Dymo tape is the best stuff I have found... if you're gouging it up, keep
readin'!

Quote:
>Is it best to scribe accross seam lins before or after the fuselage or
>wing halfs have been assembled?

Up to you, but it's easier to get the lines to line up if you scribe after
assembly... if you do it first, and then assemble, if they don't line up,
you're screwed, as they say in the vernacular.

Quote:
>How do you keep from getting panel lines that look like they were made
>with a Ditch Witch?

You are using too much pressure. It's better to make the line in several
light passes instead of dragging the scriber across and getting it in
there with one heavy pull. That's probably why you're gouging your label
tape.

Quote:
>What is the best method of fixing a screwup? Filler putty or CA? Or some
>other method? I have tried putty, but all that happens is that I end up
>chipping out the putty.

If you have to use putty, a catalyzed polester putty like tamiya's or the
Evercoat Euro-soft is the best, because it wont chip the way Testors,
Squadron Red/White or Bondo spot putty do. Acclerated CA with a baking
soda filler is my personal favorite, though!

Quote:
>Is there a better scriber to use? Some people that I have talked to like
>the Tamiya scriber. I'm sure that this is one of those personal
preferance
>questions but I'd still like to hear your opinions.

For years, a sewing needle tied in a split 1/4" dowel with  thread was my
"scriber". I have used the Squadron scriber with great success. Sounds
more like technique is the problem here, not tools.

Oh yeah, back off on the *** beverages...

MadMat
Buckaroo Banzai, the ***space Samurai?    "Neue Regel is Here!!!"

 
 
 

Panel Line Scribing - Help Needed

Post by Toby B. Mart » Sat, 15 Jul 1995 04:00:00



Quote:

> Eraser shields from the art supply store are dandy. Some Japanese
> manufacturer
> made a dandy photoetched access-panel scribing guide from brass, but it
> has disappeared on my workbench somewhere. Highly recommended.
> (Trimaster?)

I've got a stainless steel one from Verlinden (expensive) that is pretty
nice...but I find myself using the Dymo (label) tape and eraser shield more
often.  I've tried the styrene strips, brass strips with and w/o
double-sided-sticky tape and have found them lacking (or maybe I just can't
hold the "template" in place well enough).

Quote:
> If you have to use putty, a catalyzed polester putty like tamiya's or the
> Evercoat Euro-soft is the best, because it wont chip the way Testors,
> Squadron Red/White or Bondo spot putty do. Acclerated CA with a baking
> soda filler is my personal favorite, though!

Where do you folks get that Tamiya putty?  I can't find a supplier
anywhere.
Is that Tamiya guy listening?  BTW, there is a place in Florida (IMEX?)
that has the Tamiya acrylics for something around $2 a bottle (I just gave
you all my source so don't dry it up :)

Quote:
> >Is there a better scriber to use? Some people that I have talked to like
> >the Tamiya scriber. I'm sure that this is one of those personal
> preferance
> >questions but I'd still like to hear your opinions.

> For years, a sewing needle tied in a split 1/4" dowel with  thread was my
> "scriber". I have used the Squadron scriber with great success. Sounds
> more like technique is the problem here, not tools.

I still use the tip from a compass (Staetler-Mars) held in a pin vice as a
suppliment to my squadron scriber.

Quote:

> MadMat
> Buckaroo Banzai, the ***space Samurai?    "Neue Regel is Here!!!"


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
One of those blasted aol-ers :)  -just kidding Mat, I'll probably be there
as soon as they take our access away :(

Toby
--

Automation & Robotics Division  NASA - Johnson Space Center   Houston, TX
Oskee-wow-wow

 
 
 

Panel Line Scribing - Help Needed

Post by Scott Kirkha » Sat, 15 Jul 1995 04:00:00


Quote:
>>Is there a better scriber to use?

I have pretty good success with dental tools that I got from my dentist.
I asked her to save the ones that she was going to send out to the
recyclers, so long as they were still in decent condition. You can use
the sharp ones for scribing, and the ones with the paddle ends to do
claying up when you are getting ready to pour a mold.