Seams

Seams

Post by Tom » Sun, 30 Dec 2012 10:22:43



OK, I'll start.  Just finishing up the assembly of a Revell 70's vintage
HE-219 German night fighter (working on the stash).  Put lots of time into
finding***pit pictures and scratch building the***pit fixtures as best I
could.  Then comes the assembly.  Generally the kit pieces fit pretty well
with the exception of several sink-holes and a couple of seams.  Following
my usual use of Squadron Green and lots of sanding things were looking
pretty well.  But following a coat of RLM 02 to the parts that would be
fairly well hidden when the engines were attached to the fuselage, those
pesky seams still show up in several places and parts of the sink holes
still need some work.   My approach has always been to use the enamel paint
of the color of the final finish, brushed heavy into the problem areas and
then sand that out when the brushed on paint over the problem areas is
totally dry.  Usually makes a pretty smooth surface for the application of
the final finish.  Any better ideas out there?  I've heard of but never seen
in California a product called "Mr Surfacer" or something like that.  Would
that provide better/faster/easier results?  Always trying to do it better...

T2

 
 
 

Seams

Post by Rufu » Sun, 30 Dec 2012 10:48:21


Quote:

> OK, I'll start.  Just finishing up the assembly of a Revell 70's vintage
> HE-219 German night fighter (working on the stash).  Put lots of time
> into finding***pit pictures and scratch building the***pit fixtures
> as best I could.  Then comes the assembly.  Generally the kit pieces fit
> pretty well with the exception of several sink-holes and a couple of
> seams.  Following my usual use of Squadron Green and lots of sanding
> things were looking pretty well.  But following a coat of RLM 02 to the
> parts that would be fairly well hidden when the engines were attached to
> the fuselage, those pesky seams still show up in several places and
> parts of the sink holes still need some work.   My approach has always
> been to use the enamel paint of the color of the final finish, brushed
> heavy into the problem areas and then sand that out when the brushed on
> paint over the problem areas is totally dry.  Usually makes a pretty
> smooth surface for the application of the final finish.  Any better
> ideas out there?  I've heard of but never seen in California a product
> called "Mr Surfacer" or something like that.  Would that provide
> better/faster/easier results?  Always trying to do it better...

> T2

I used to see Mr Surfacer here in CA, but only at very select locations
like Brookhurst.  Dunno if they'd still have it or not.

My fav putty is Tamiya putty - also hard to find in CA, but still around
and also available mail order.  Best for filling sink holes...and just
plain the best all around.  Squadron green used to be really good, but
the formulation was changed back in the 80s and I haven't been able to
make it work since.

As for seams - liquid glue and clamps, followed up with a Flexi-File on
things like wing edges and fuselage seams; use enough liquid glue to let
a bit of "molten" plastic flow out of the clamped seam.  My favorite
clamps are Berna Assemblers - next best thing to the human
hand...whenever I see them I buy them, can't have enough of them!  Using
this method you'll find you'll use very little putty.  If any.  I like
to use an artist's brush to apply liquid glue - a #1.  I prefer
Testors...I like its working time.

If you really want a great tool for getting into tight spots and corner
seams like fillets and nacelle joins, get yourself a dental cavity file
- it's an angled instrument like a dental pick, but with a small knob of
a file on the end about twice the size of the head of a pin.  I found
mine at a gun show for about $2-3 as I recall.  One of *the* most useful
tools on my bench.

...and I'm waiting in earnest for the big 1/32 He 219 from Revell of
Germany - it was supposed to be in stores for Christmas, now they're
saying January...the teases!

--
      - Rufus

 
 
 

Seams

Post by Bruce Burd » Sun, 30 Dec 2012 12:35:20


: OK, I'll start.  Just finishing up the assembly of a Revell 70's vintage
:
: could.  Then comes the assembly.  Generally the kit pieces fit pretty well
: with the exception of several sink-holes and a couple of seams.  Following
:
: fairly well hidden when the engines were attached to the fuselage, those
: pesky seams still show up in several places and parts of the sink holes
: still need some work.
:
        I like Tamiya thin cement - the green topped bottle. I use a
   lot of tamiya cement to close the gaps - the glue capillaries very
   well, and it tends to draw the plastic into the seam.

        Mr. Surfacer 500 is still my favorite filler. I apply with a
   toothpick (wooden), and let it sit for around 24 hours. If an additional
   application is required, I add it.

        A lot of elbow grease and rubbing *** will remove Mr.
   Surfacer if you have detail you don't want to risk. Add some favorite
   brew (***) to the mix as required. Otherwise, I use x-acto
   blades to cut off excess filler, x-acto blades to s***the filler
   off (works best on convex or flat surfaces. Avoid on concave
   surfaces), files and sandpaper if I don't want to invest the time
   rubbing the surface down with ***.

        As for Squadron Green - I find I swear at it much more than
   I have ever sworn by it - it never stops shrinking.

                                                        Bruce
--
------------------------------------------------------------------------
  "I like bad!"                         Bruce Burden    Austin, TX.
        - Thuganlitha
        The Power and the Prophet
        Robert Don Hughes

 
 
 

Seams

Post by Jessic » Sun, 30 Dec 2012 13:16:15




Quote:
> Any better ideas out there?  I've heard of but never seen in
> California a product called "Mr Surfacer" or something like that.
> Would that provide better/faster/easier results?  Always trying to do
> it better...

If you can't find Mr Surfacer, try White Out. It's about the same
thickness, sands roughly the same and costs way less : )

J

 
 
 

Seams

Post by Tom » Sun, 30 Dec 2012 13:38:23


White out, huh?  I'll have try that.  Off to Office depot I go...

T2




Quote:
> Any better ideas out there?  I've heard of but never seen in
> California a product called "Mr Surfacer" or something like that.
> Would that provide better/faster/easier results?  Always trying to do
> it better...

If you can't find Mr Surfacer, try White Out. It's about the same
thickness, sands roughly the same and costs way less : )

J

 
 
 

Seams

Post by Tom » Sun, 30 Dec 2012 13:45:36


I too use Testor's glue, Rufus.  Nice and thick and stays well til the parts
are mated.  Used to do everything with cyano, but that tended to make a mess
of any detail as well as the lack of set time.  Harbor freight seems to have
a lot of cheap, useful tools like that.  Found some nice small diamond files
there as well.

T2

Quote:


> OK, I'll start.  Just finishing up the assembly of a Revell 70's vintage
> HE-219 German night fighter (working on the stash).  Put lots of time
> into finding***pit pictures and scratch building the***pit fixtures
> as best I could.  Then comes the assembly.  Generally the kit pieces fit
> pretty well with the exception of several sink-holes and a couple of
> seams.  Following my usual use of Squadron Green and lots of sanding
> things were looking pretty well.  But following a coat of RLM 02 to the
> parts that would be fairly well hidden when the engines were attached to
> the fuselage, those pesky seams still show up in several places and
> parts of the sink holes still need some work.   My approach has always
> been to use the enamel paint of the color of the final finish, brushed
> heavy into the problem areas and then sand that out when the brushed on
> paint over the problem areas is totally dry.  Usually makes a pretty
> smooth surface for the application of the final finish.  Any better
> ideas out there?  I've heard of but never seen in California a product
> called "Mr Surfacer" or something like that.  Would that provide
> better/faster/easier results?  Always trying to do it better...  I have a
> Harbior Freight/Indian produced dental pick set as well as their clay
> carving set.  The latter is really useful for applying the Squadron Green
> with a little acetone/finger nail polish remover.

> T2

I used to see Mr Surfacer here in CA, but only at very select locations
like Brookhurst.  Dunno if they'd still have it or not.

My fav putty is Tamiya putty - also hard to find in CA, but still around
and also available mail order.  Best for filling sink holes...and just
plain the best all around.  Squadron green used to be really good, but
the formulation was changed back in the 80s and I haven't been able to
make it work since.

As for seams - liquid glue and clamps, followed up with a Flexi-File on
things like wing edges and fuselage seams; use enough liquid glue to let
a bit of "molten" plastic flow out of the clamped seam.  My favorite
clamps are Berna Assemblers - next best thing to the human
hand...whenever I see them I buy them, can't have enough of them!  Using
this method you'll find you'll use very little putty.  If any.  I like
to use an artist's brush to apply liquid glue - a #1.  I prefer
Testors...I like its working time.

If you really want a great tool for getting into tight spots and corner
seams like fillets and nacelle joins, get yourself a dental cavity file
- it's an angled instrument like a dental pick, but with a small knob of
a file on the end about twice the size of the head of a pin.  I found
mine at a gun show for about $2-3 as I recall.  One of *the* most useful
tools on my bench.

...and I'm waiting in earnest for the big 1/32 He 219 from Revell of
Germany - it was supposed to be in stores for Christmas, now they're
saying January...the teases!

--
      - Rufus

 
 
 

Seams

Post by Tom » Sun, 30 Dec 2012 13:48:48


How about the Squadron White, Bruce?  That supposedly claims to be a little
smoother/finer.  I don't see much difference and have stuck with the Green
just cause its a little easier to see when applied in the seam or divot.

T2

: OK, I'll start.  Just finishing up the assembly of a Revell 70's vintage
:
: could.  Then comes the assembly.  Generally the kit pieces fit pretty well
: with the exception of several sink-holes and a couple of seams.  Following
:
: fairly well hidden when the engines were attached to the fuselage, those
: pesky seams still show up in several places and parts of the sink holes
: still need some work.
:
I like Tamiya thin cement - the green topped bottle. I use a
   lot of tamiya cement to close the gaps - the glue capillaries very
   well, and it tends to draw the plastic into the seam.

Mr. Surfacer 500 is still my favorite filler. I apply with a
   toothpick (wooden), and let it sit for around 24 hours. If an additional
   application is required, I add it.

A lot of elbow grease and rubbing *** will remove Mr.
   Surfacer if you have detail you don't want to risk. Add some favorite
   brew (***) to the mix as required. Otherwise, I use x-acto
   blades to cut off excess filler, x-acto blades to s***the filler
   off (works best on convex or flat surfaces. Avoid on concave
   surfaces), files and sandpaper if I don't want to invest the time
   rubbing the surface down with ***.

As for Squadron Green - I find I swear at it much more than
   I have ever sworn by it - it never stops shrinking.

Bruce
--
------------------------------------------------------------------------
  "I like bad!"                         Bruce Burden    Austin, TX.
        - Thuganlitha
        The Power and the Prophet
        Robert Don Hughes

 
 
 

Seams

Post by Rufu » Sun, 30 Dec 2012 14:45:54


Squadron white is finer grained, but cracks and falls out...very easily.

--
      - Rufus

Quote:

> How about the Squadron White, Bruce?  That supposedly claims to be a
> little smoother/finer.  I don't see much difference and have stuck with
> the Green just cause its a little easier to see when applied in the seam
> or divot.

> T2



> : OK, I'll start.  Just finishing up the assembly of a Revell 70's vintage
> :
> : could.  Then comes the assembly.  Generally the kit pieces fit pretty
> well
> : with the exception of several sink-holes and a couple of seams.
> Following
> :
> : fairly well hidden when the engines were attached to the fuselage, those
> : pesky seams still show up in several places and parts of the sink holes
> : still need some work.
> :
> I like Tamiya thin cement - the green topped bottle. I use a
>    lot of tamiya cement to close the gaps - the glue capillaries very
>    well, and it tends to draw the plastic into the seam.

> Mr. Surfacer 500 is still my favorite filler. I apply with a
>    toothpick (wooden), and let it sit for around 24 hours. If an additional
>    application is required, I add it.

> A lot of elbow grease and rubbing *** will remove Mr.
>    Surfacer if you have detail you don't want to risk. Add some favorite
>    brew (***) to the mix as required. Otherwise, I use x-acto
>    blades to cut off excess filler, x-acto blades to s***the filler
>    off (works best on convex or flat surfaces. Avoid on concave
>    surfaces), files and sandpaper if I don't want to invest the time
>    rubbing the surface down with ***.

> As for Squadron Green - I find I swear at it much more than
>    I have ever sworn by it - it never stops shrinking.

> Bruce

 
 
 

Seams

Post by Rufu » Sun, 30 Dec 2012 14:50:04


I don't use the thick Testors stuff anymore...ahhh - the old red tube!
I use the thin, liquid stuff.  Apply it with a brush.  And clamp - it's
really the proper use of clamps that eliminates seams.

I also like to use the black cyano meant for tires.  It's easier to see
where you're putting it, it's more flexible, and has a longer working
time.  For smaller flat etched parts I'll also use watch crystal cement.

--
      - Rufus

Quote:

> I too use Testor's glue, Rufus.  Nice and thick and stays well til the
> parts are mated.  Used to do everything with cyano, but that tended to
> make a mess of any detail as well as the lack of set time.  Harbor
> freight seems to have a lot of cheap, useful tools like that.  Found
> some nice small diamond files there as well.

> T2




>> OK, I'll start.  Just finishing up the assembly of a Revell 70's vintage
>> HE-219 German night fighter (working on the stash).  Put lots of time
>> into finding***pit pictures and scratch building the***pit fixtures
>> as best I could.  Then comes the assembly.  Generally the kit pieces fit
>> pretty well with the exception of several sink-holes and a couple of
>> seams.  Following my usual use of Squadron Green and lots of sanding
>> things were looking pretty well.  But following a coat of RLM 02 to the
>> parts that would be fairly well hidden when the engines were attached to
>> the fuselage, those pesky seams still show up in several places and
>> parts of the sink holes still need some work.   My approach has always
>> been to use the enamel paint of the color of the final finish, brushed
>> heavy into the problem areas and then sand that out when the brushed on
>> paint over the problem areas is totally dry.  Usually makes a pretty
>> smooth surface for the application of the final finish.  Any better
>> ideas out there?  I've heard of but never seen in California a product
>> called "Mr Surfacer" or something like that.  Would that provide
>> better/faster/easier results?  Always trying to do it better...  I
>> have a Harbior Freight/Indian produced dental pick set as well as
>> their clay carving set.  The latter is really useful for applying the
>> Squadron Green with a little acetone/finger nail polish remover.

>> T2

> I used to see Mr Surfacer here in CA, but only at very select locations
> like Brookhurst.  Dunno if they'd still have it or not.

> My fav putty is Tamiya putty - also hard to find in CA, but still around
> and also available mail order.  Best for filling sink holes...and just
> plain the best all around.  Squadron green used to be really good, but
> the formulation was changed back in the 80s and I haven't been able to
> make it work since.

> As for seams - liquid glue and clamps, followed up with a Flexi-File on
> things like wing edges and fuselage seams; use enough liquid glue to let
> a bit of "molten" plastic flow out of the clamped seam.  My favorite
> clamps are Berna Assemblers - next best thing to the human
> hand...whenever I see them I buy them, can't have enough of them!  Using
> this method you'll find you'll use very little putty.  If any.  I like
> to use an artist's brush to apply liquid glue - a #1.  I prefer
> Testors...I like its working time.

> If you really want a great tool for getting into tight spots and corner
> seams like fillets and nacelle joins, get yourself a dental cavity file
> - it's an angled instrument like a dental pick, but with a small knob of
> a file on the end about twice the size of the head of a pin.  I found
> mine at a gun show for about $2-3 as I recall.  One of *the* most useful
> tools on my bench.

> ...and I'm waiting in earnest for the big 1/32 He 219 from Revell of
> Germany - it was supposed to be in stores for Christmas, now they're
> saying January...the teases!

 
 
 

Seams

Post by willsha » Sun, 30 Dec 2012 22:31:56


Tom wrote the following on 12/28/2012 11:38 PM (ET):

Quote:
> White out, huh?  I'll have try that.  Off to Office depot I go...

Testors also makes what they call 'Contour Putty'. It is also white and
seems to dry faster than Squadron Green Putty.

Quote:

> T2





>> Any better ideas out there?  I've heard of but never seen in
>> California a product called "Mr Surfacer" or something like that.
>> Would that provide better/faster/easier results?  Always trying to do
>> it better...

> If you can't find Mr Surfacer, try White Out. It's about the same
> thickness, sands roughly the same and costs way less : )

> J

--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
In the original Orange County. Est. 1683

 
 
 

Seams

Post by Tom » Mon, 31 Dec 2012 03:27:05


I actually went out and bought a red tube of that stuff some time ago for a
particular application, but no, I mean the Testor's allegedly liquid in the
black, square container with the angular spout.  I got a couple of them a
couple of years ago on close out special and they still work, though I think
they have thickened.  I put out a little dollop of it and apply with a pin
or tooth pick or some such.  Doesn't get "strings" like the tube glue.

Black cyano??  Never heard of that.   Sounds messy.  Auto parts store?  What
do you use it on?

For 1/700 ship PE parts, I still use a little white glue to get them into
position and then cyano carefully to finish them.

T2

I don't use the thick Testors stuff anymore...ahhh - the old red tube!
I use the thin, liquid stuff.  Apply it with a brush.  And clamp - it's
really the proper use of clamps that eliminates seams.

I also like to use the black cyano meant for tires.  It's easier to see
where you're putting it, it's more flexible, and has a longer working
time.  For smaller flat etched parts I'll also use watch crystal cement.

--
      - Rufus

Quote:

> I too use Testor's glue, Rufus.  Nice and thick and stays well til the
> parts are mated.  Used to do everything with cyano, but that tended to
> make a mess of any detail as well as the lack of set time.  Harbor
> freight seems to have a lot of cheap, useful tools like that.  Found
> some nice small diamond files there as well.

> T2




>> OK, I'll start.  Just finishing up the assembly of a Revell 70's vintage
>> HE-219 German night fighter (working on the stash).  Put lots of time
>> into finding***pit pictures and scratch building the***pit fixtures
>> as best I could.  Then comes the assembly.  Generally the kit pieces fit
>> pretty well with the exception of several sink-holes and a couple of
>> seams.  Following my usual use of Squadron Green and lots of sanding
>> things were looking pretty well.  But following a coat of RLM 02 to the
>> parts that would be fairly well hidden when the engines were attached to
>> the fuselage, those pesky seams still show up in several places and
>> parts of the sink holes still need some work.   My approach has always
>> been to use the enamel paint of the color of the final finish, brushed
>> heavy into the problem areas and then sand that out when the brushed on
>> paint over the problem areas is totally dry.  Usually makes a pretty
>> smooth surface for the application of the final finish.  Any better
>> ideas out there?  I've heard of but never seen in California a product
>> called "Mr Surfacer" or something like that.  Would that provide
>> better/faster/easier results?  Always trying to do it better...  I
>> have a Harbior Freight/Indian produced dental pick set as well as
>> their clay carving set.  The latter is really useful for applying the
>> Squadron Green with a little acetone/finger nail polish remover.

>> T2

> I used to see Mr Surfacer here in CA, but only at very select locations
> like Brookhurst.  Dunno if they'd still have it or not.

> My fav putty is Tamiya putty - also hard to find in CA, but still around
> and also available mail order.  Best for filling sink holes...and just
> plain the best all around.  Squadron green used to be really good, but
> the formulation was changed back in the 80s and I haven't been able to
> make it work since.

> As for seams - liquid glue and clamps, followed up with a Flexi-File on
> things like wing edges and fuselage seams; use enough liquid glue to let
> a bit of "molten" plastic flow out of the clamped seam.  My favorite
> clamps are Berna Assemblers - next best thing to the human
> hand...whenever I see them I buy them, can't have enough of them!  Using
> this method you'll find you'll use very little putty.  If any.  I like
> to use an artist's brush to apply liquid glue - a #1.  I prefer
> Testors...I like its working time.

> If you really want a great tool for getting into tight spots and corner
> seams like fillets and nacelle joins, get yourself a dental cavity file
> - it's an angled instrument like a dental pick, but with a small knob of
> a file on the end about twice the size of the head of a pin.  I found
> mine at a gun show for about $2-3 as I recall.  One of *the* most useful
> tools on my bench.

> ...and I'm waiting in earnest for the big 1/32 He 219 from Revell of
> Germany - it was supposed to be in stores for Christmas, now they're
> saying January...the teases!

 
 
 

Seams

Post by Tom » Mon, 31 Dec 2012 03:34:23


I've never tried it, but I wonder if the White might benefit from the
Swannys acetone/fingernail polish remover method?  Would let it get more
"bite" on the surface.

T2

Squadron white is finer grained, but cracks and falls out...very easily.

--
      - Rufus

Quote:

> How about the Squadron White, Bruce?  That supposedly claims to be a
> little smoother/finer.  I don't see much difference and have stuck with
> the Green just cause its a little easier to see when applied in the seam
> or divot.

> T2



> : OK, I'll start.  Just finishing up the assembly of a Revell 70's vintage
> :
> : could.  Then comes the assembly.  Generally the kit pieces fit pretty
> well
> : with the exception of several sink-holes and a couple of seams.
> Following
> :
> : fairly well hidden when the engines were attached to the fuselage, those
> : pesky seams still show up in several places and parts of the sink holes
> : still need some work.
> :
> I like Tamiya thin cement - the green topped bottle. I use a
>    lot of tamiya cement to close the gaps - the glue capillaries very
>    well, and it tends to draw the plastic into the seam.

> Mr. Surfacer 500 is still my favorite filler. I apply with a
>    toothpick (wooden), and let it sit for around 24 hours. If an
> additional
>    application is required, I add it.

> A lot of elbow grease and rubbing *** will remove Mr.
>    Surfacer if you have detail you don't want to risk. Add some favorite
>    brew (***) to the mix as required. Otherwise, I use x-acto
>    blades to cut off excess filler, x-acto blades to s***the filler
>    off (works best on convex or flat surfaces. Avoid on concave
>    surfaces), files and sandpaper if I don't want to invest the time
>    rubbing the surface down with ***.

> As for Squadron Green - I find I swear at it much more than
>    I have ever sworn by it - it never stops shrinking.

> Bruce

 
 
 

Seams

Post by Rufu » Mon, 31 Dec 2012 04:24:36


Some hobby store sell cyano under a "store brand", but I think it all
comes from same place.  Look for it as "tire cement".  It's just
slightly thicker than thick clear cyano, but because it's black it's far
more easy to see and apply for small parts.  It has a bit longer working
time, and is fairly easy to clean/scrape off when partially set.  It
tends to gel in the bottle though...seems like I'm always buying a new
bottle of it...

I generally apply cyano (even the black stuff) using a needle in a pin
vise, or a sharpened toothpick.  Watch crystal cement works about like
white glue, except it's far stronger and tougher - put down a dot and
then you can poke the part around with a needle to nudge it into place.
  Once set, it's *stuck*.

<http://www.micromark.com/watch-crystal-cement-two-1and3-oz-tubes,7468...>

I bought two tubes of this stuff over a decade ago and haven't gone
through it yet - I'm still using the first tube; small amount goes a
long way.  I also use it for installing canopies...won't use anything
else.  And I always apply glues metal to plastic, or plastic to plastic
- never over/through paint.

I was using both black cyano and watch crystal cement just last night to
put the etched hinges on the deck plates of my 1/72 Revell Type VII
u-boat.  There's 48 of them little suckers, about the size of a pin
head.  Found it far easier to work with the watch crystal cement...got
eight more of them to lay down today, then I'm done with that eye-crosser.

--
      - Rufus

Quote:

> I actually went out and bought a red tube of that stuff some time ago
> for a particular application, but no, I mean the Testor's allegedly
> liquid in the black, square container with the angular spout.  I got a
> couple of them a couple of years ago on close out special and they still
> work, though I think they have thickened.  I put out a little dollop of
> it and apply with a pin or tooth pick or some such.  Doesn't get
> "strings" like the tube glue.

> Black cyano??  Never heard of that.   Sounds messy.  Auto parts store?
> What do you use it on?

> For 1/700 ship PE parts, I still use a little white glue to get them
> into position and then cyano carefully to finish them.

> T2



> I don't use the thick Testors stuff anymore...ahhh - the old red tube!
> I use the thin, liquid stuff.  Apply it with a brush.  And clamp - it's
> really the proper use of clamps that eliminates seams.

> I also like to use the black cyano meant for tires.  It's easier to see
> where you're putting it, it's more flexible, and has a longer working
> time.  For smaller flat etched parts I'll also use watch crystal cement.

 
 
 

Seams

Post by Rufu » Mon, 31 Dec 2012 04:29:51


I've had some luck mixing Testors liquid glue (from the bottle) with
putties, but only in small amounts...and have never been able to find
anything that works with Squadron putties.

I tried filling in bubbles in Squadron green with the white stuff...it
sanded down nice, then cracked and flaked off.  Then I went to Dr.
Microtools red putty, and that stuff was fantastic.  And of course they
stopped making it.  Testors red putty is similar, but the tube I got
wasn't mixed right and became gummy.  So I don't buy it anymore.

Since I found Tamiya putty I never use anything else now.  That stuff is
the best!

--
      - Rufus

Quote:

> I've never tried it, but I wonder if the White might benefit from the
> Swannys acetone/fingernail polish remover method?  Would let it get more
> "bite" on the surface.

> T2



> Squadron white is finer grained, but cracks and falls out...very easily.

 
 
 

Seams

Post by Jessic » Mon, 31 Dec 2012 06:37:53


I've been using this stuff for a few years.
http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/Car/Care/Products/Product-
Catalog/Pages/?PC_7_RJH9U5230ONO70I0C3275H2K94000000
_nid=FLPZ9HDTFTgsXRMSG6848Wgl4D7WG9JX0Hbl
It works as well as any other putty, and is much cheaper than hobby brands.