AM prices back on track

AM prices back on track

Post by DBatt565 » Sun, 06 Feb 2000 04:00:00



One of the best bits of news I've seen recently appeared in the latest SAMI
(February 2000) and I'm surprised no-one else has seen it.  (Unless my
newsreader missed the whole thing, which isn't unheard of.)

Apparently Accurate Miniatures has responded very rapidly to the recent hikes
in kit prices and as a result the UK price for the new Mitchells is going to be
39.00 or less, rather than the threatened 50.00+ which was being circulated
before the new year.  If I understand the situation correctly the same
arrangement applies to their exisiting and other new kits as well, so hopefully
the Grumman fighters will come down to an achievable cost as well.

If this comparatively small US company can break the mould in yet another way
(their first being to deliver mainstream kits to standards unheard of only a
few years ago) then perhaps some monolithic Oriental manufacturers might back
down from a 'take it or leave it' attitude where their prices are concerned.

David Batt

 
 
 

AM prices back on track

Post by Jonathan Mo » Sun, 06 Feb 2000 04:00:00



Quote:

> One of the best bits of news I've seen recently appeared in the latest SAMI
> (February 2000) and I'm surprised no-one else has seen it.  (Unless my
> newsreader missed the whole thing, which isn't unheard of.)

> Apparently Accurate Miniatures has responded very rapidly to the recent hikes
> in kit prices and as a result the UK price for the new Mitchells is going
to be
> 39.00 or less, rather than the threatened 50.00+ which was being circulated
> before the new year.  If I understand the situation correctly the same
> arrangement applies to their exisiting and other new kits as well, so
hopefully
> the Grumman fighters will come down to an achievable cost as well.

> If this comparatively small US company can break the mould in yet another way
> (their first being to deliver mainstream kits to standards unheard of only a
> few years ago) then perhaps some monolithic Oriental manufacturers might back
> down from a 'take it or leave it' attitude where their prices are concerned.

> David Batt

Manufacturers rarely set export prices - these are down to the individual
importers/distributors - for exmaple, Italeri's F-22 retails in the US for
much more than it does in the UK. Do Italeri set that price? No.

Likewise, those "Oriental manufacturers" set a yen price for the internal
market (which is usually reasonable for home consumption). Anything outside
of Japan is down to exchange rates, import duties and the distributors.

--
Jonathan Mock

3Quick to judge, quick to anger, slow to understand
Ignorance and prejudice, and fear, walk hand in hand...2

 
 
 

AM prices back on track

Post by PSC » Sun, 06 Feb 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

> Manufacturers rarely set export prices - these are down to the individual
> importers/distributors -

To second Jonathon - the problem was, and has always been, the
middleman/wholesaler/importer in so far as the UK price of AM kits. AM's
share of the eventual retail price is pretty small - certainly MUCH less
than the cheapest discount US price ( 25-30% off MSRP) which you have
seen posted on the web. The manufacturer typically makes the least as
compared to the retailer and wholesaler - go figure ! VAT and shipping
certainly add something - but do not explain the big prices. Monopoly
pricing, for you economists, comes closest, as the importers are the
closest thing to monopolies in the model business "avenue of
distribution". "Gouging" by the importers is another word that comes to
mind.

When you see the HUGE prices being charged in the UK for imported kits,
you should take a close look at who is doing the importing. AM wants to
sell lots of kits - not to alienate the "end-user". They went and argued
with the importer and got the prices lowered.

Pete Chalmers

 
 
 

AM prices back on track

Post by william Shue » Sun, 06 Feb 2000 04:00:00


Pete:

    A manufacturer who is unhappy with the importer can always cut a deal with
someone else to import their stuff. If it is very popular "Stuff" like AM's
kits they have even better leverage, looks like they used it.

Bill Shuey

Quote:

>  "They went and argued with the importer and got the prices lowered."

> Pete Chalmers

 
 
 

AM prices back on track

Post by Coaste » Sun, 06 Feb 2000 04:00:00



Quote:
> If this comparatively small US company can break the mould in yet another way
> (their first being to deliver mainstream kits to standards unheard of only a
> few years ago) then perhaps some monolithic Oriental manufacturers might back
> down from a 'take it or leave it' attitude where their prices are concerned.

Whenever I see prices in the UK magazines I buy, I'm amazed the hobby even
exists in the UK.

As for prices of kits from Japan, China, etc. its the importer/wholesaler
that sets the price not the manufacturers.

All Tamiya's kits have the MSRP next to the kit number but rarely are a
series of 2000yen kits all the same price. Even 1800yen kits can sell at
2400yen kit prices. I've come to the conclusion its based purely on the
wholesaler's perceived modeller demand for the kits. The 1800yen Ford
Focus WRC was $6 more then the 2000yen Pensoil Nissan. Why? I think
because they knew the WRC would be more popular and modellers would be
willing to pay more.

Another example. The 5300yen 1/35 'FAMO' was $93Cdn and the 5800yen 1/6
Yamaha YZ250 was only $80. The 'FAMO' would have been $75 if based solely
on Tamiya's MSRP. But they knew the German WWII armour modellers would
eagerly fork over the $93. In some cases, local prices can be so high that
its actually cheaper to order straight from Japan. The 'FAMO' is $130 at
places. For another $50 I could order two from Japan (at MSPR prices) and
have them for $90 each delivered.

Ken

--
Coaster (aka Ken Hartlen)

Visit my Motorcycle Modelling page at http://www.interlog.com/~khartlen