Scribing panel lines

Scribing panel lines

Post by Peter Sim » Sun, 12 Mar 1995 02:00:18



I'm trying my hand at some mild conversions for the first time, and things
were going pretty smoothly until the time came for me to start scribing
in new panel lines.  I'm using a #11 blade with a metal straight edge. It's
coming out okay, but for the amount of time I'm pouring into this step,
I'd like it to come out a lot better than just "okay".  Does anyone have
and good advice for me?  Are there any special tools I could look into
buying?

--
Pete S.              You call that blocking?  'Cause I don't.  I call it a
                     bunch of old ladies waiting for a bus.  Now let's see
Go N.Y. Giants!      some blocking or I'll staple you to an electric fence!
                                        -John Madden

 
 
 

Scribing panel lines

Post by Mark A. Nato » Sun, 12 Mar 1995 06:13:37


Quote:


>Subject: Scribing panel lines
>Date: 10 Mar 1995 17:00:18 GMT
>I'm trying my hand at some mild conversions for the first time, and things
>were going pretty smoothly until the time came for me to start scribing
>in new panel lines.  I'm using a #11 blade with a metal straight edge. It's
>coming out okay, but for the amount of time I'm pouring into this step,
>I'd like it to come out a lot better than just "okay".  Does anyone have
>and good advice for me?

Practice, practice, practice!!!

Mark

 
 
 

Scribing panel lines

Post by MaddMat1 » Sun, 12 Mar 1995 14:27:29


Squadron has an excellent panel scribing tool, as does Bare Metal Foil.
Look for their ads in Fine Scale modeler. I find a good flexible plastic
ruler helps.

MadMat
MadMat

 
 
 

Scribing panel lines

Post by Corsair6 » Sun, 12 Mar 1995 22:15:14


Quote:
>I'm trying my hand at some mild conversions for the first time, and
>things were going pretty smoothly until the time came for me to start
>scribing in new panel lines.

Pete,
The scribing tools mentioned are great, but there's no substutute for
practice. I use .010 styrene sheet for guides and double backed tape
that's thin and real sticky works great holding it in place. You can
easily trim the styrene to scribe curved lines and even punch holes in it
for those round access panels, cut any shape hole for odd shaped stuff.
It's not very durable, but it's very easy to work with and durable enough
for one model.

Woody Vondracek
IPMS 30182
"I think, therefore I am confused"

 
 
 

Scribing panel lines

Post by Jennings Heili » Mon, 13 Mar 1995 00:49:39


Here's another little trick for scribing panel lines -

        Get a roll or five of the plastic tape that goes
        in label maker machines.  It's pretty cheap at Office Depot
        and makes a great scribing straightedge. It has stickum on
        the back side and is thin enough to bend and thick enough
        to guide the scriber well.

Cheers,

Jennings Heilig

 
 
 

Scribing panel lines

Post by David Wil » Mon, 13 Mar 1995 00:57:27


I've had good results using a homemade scribing tool. I've taken a sharp
tip from an old drafting compass and mounted it into an Xacto handle.

The drawback is the tool throws up a "bow wave" of plastic, leaving
little ridges of plastic on either side of the scribed line. These will
have to be sanded down.

I understand there is a commercially available scribing tool that carves
out a small channel without leaving these ridges, but being to miserly to
invest, I've never tried to use one.

 
 
 

Scribing panel lines

Post by Andrew Madis » Wed, 15 Mar 1995 01:18:44


: >I'm trying my hand at some mild conversions for the first time, and
: >things were going pretty smoothly until the time came for me to start
: >scribing in new panel lines.
:
: Pete,
: The scribing tools mentioned are great, but there's no substutute for
: practice. I use .010 styrene sheet for guides and double backed tape
: that's thin and real sticky works great holding it in place. You can
: easily trim the styrene to scribe curved lines and even punch holes in it
: for those round access panels, cut any shape hole for odd shaped stuff.
: It's not very durable, but it's very easy to work with and durable enough
: for one model.

Practice may be the first rule to scribing panel lines, but process is
important too.  Which means there is a 3rd rule to scribing panel lines,
which is patience!

Here's my technique for making panel lines that require minimal clean up:

1. determine the location of the lines.  You may need to mark them first,
   especially if they're particularly dense and regularly space.  For
   instance, I had a series of ports all evenly spaced and the same size.
   Being particularly ***during this stage was rewarded with superior end
   results.
2. apply the appropriate straightedge, or guide.  (I regularly use
   compass(es) and dividers for circular panels).  I've used thin sheets of
   brass, drafting triangles, s***styrene, and tape.  Anything that
   conforms to the shape and holds up to a tool pass is appropriate.
3. lightly!! apply the first pass with either a sharp needle, an no. 11
   blade, or tungsten scribe.
4. deepen/widen as necessary.  The first pass would be only a scratch.
   Here is where the panel line is defined sufficiently to survive a coat
   of paint.  At this point one can use: the back of a no. 11 blade,
   tungsten scribe, sharp needle, or a scribing tool.  I've made the
   investment in a scribing tool, and I'm never going back.  Why?  Because
   you *pull* with a scribing tool, all of the others you must *push*
   through the plastic.  Styrene, at the dimensions of interest, is
   notoriously inconsistent in hardness.  Some regions will easily carve.
   Other regions will require additional passes.  The temptation will be
   to push *harder* but the result will be a tool slip and a scratch across
   an unintended surface.  Pulling a scribing tool makes this temptation
   much less likely and re-emphasis passes much easier to control.

It sounds like a bit much (US$10), but the amount of time saved in not
cleaning up marred panels will pay for itself in no time.

--
A.J. Madison                          PHONE: (508) 490-6972
Stratus Computer Inc.              


 
 
 

Scribing panel lines

Post by Jeff Waldr » Sat, 18 Mar 1995 13:30:49



Quote:

>and good advice for me?  Are there any special tools I could look into
>buying?

There is a company called Micro-Mark,"the small tool specialists" that sell
a special scriber for plastic.  Sounds like a gadget, but it really works!
I would highly recommend their catalogue to any serious modelers.
        Micro-Mark
        340 Snyder Ave.
        Berkeley Heights, NJ 07922-1595
        (908) 464-6764

Jeff Waldron

 
 
 

Scribing panel lines

Post by ssm.. » Sun, 19 Mar 1995 22:41:44



Quote:
>Are there any special tools I could look into buying?

When I buy a new shirt, there is usually some clear plastic in the collar: it
makes a perfect guide for scribing, since it's strong enough to hold some
pressure, and since it's clear, you can see what you are doing.

Stefan.