Scribing Panel Lines

Scribing Panel Lines

Post by Raymond A. Morriss » Fri, 29 Aug 1997 04:00:00



I noticed several responses to the question regarding scribing panel
lines which offer excellent suggestions for tools.  My problem is
grasping the actual technique.  I've tried most of the tools mentioned
but my guide always seems to slip.  For the people who use flexible
rulers, I don't see how you hold the ruler, the model and the scriber
all at the same time.  Also how do you scribe around fuselages or
compund surfaces.  A bit more elaboration on this topic would be
greatly appreciated.

Thanks to all who respond.

 
 
 

Scribing Panel Lines

Post by Brian McCarro » Fri, 29 Aug 1997 04:00:00




My problem is grasping the actual technique.  I've tried most of the tools
mentioned

Quote:
> but my guide always seems to slip.

One of the best tricks that I have tried regarding this is to use flexible
plastic labeller tape that comes from the Dymo labeller.  It is
self-adhesive, once you peel the backing off, and it then can be used as a
guide and removed when the scribing is finished.  Good luck.



 
 
 

Scribing Panel Lines

Post by saberje » Fri, 29 Aug 1997 04:00:00


Quote:


> > I noticed several responses to the question regarding scribing panel
> > lines which offer excellent suggestions for tools.  My problem is
> > grasping the actual technique.  I've tried most of the tools mentioned
> > but my guide always seems to slip.  For the people who use flexible
> > rulers, I don't see how you hold the ruler, the model and the scriber
> > all at the same time.  Also how do you scribe around fuselages or
> > compund surfaces.  A bit more elaboration on this topic would be
> > greatly appreciated.

> > Thanks to all who respond.

> I tape my guide in place or try using embossing lable tape (Dynamo) this
> works the best as it is stiff, strairgt and comes with it's own
> adhesive. Good luck!

> Dr. Plastik
> IPMS #32683

Agreed - except I believe it's called Dymo tape (might make it easier to
find in a store).  Another great advantage to this tape is that you can
cut it into thinner strips, making it easier to tape down around
coumpound curves.  Once you have it down, be patient.  Scrible LIGHTLY,
just using the weight of the scriber as your pressure, and move slowly.  

HTH,

Mark

 
 
 

Scribing Panel Lines

Post by MODEL HA » Sat, 30 Aug 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

>I noticed several responses to the question regarding scribing panel
>lines which offer excellent suggestions for tools.  My problem is
>grasping the actual technique.  I've tried most of the tools mentioned
>but my guide always seems to slip.  For the people who use flexible
>rulers, I don't see how you hold the ruler, the model and the scriber
>all at the same time.  Also how do you scribe around fuselages or
>compund surfaces.  A bit more elaboration on this topic would be
>greatly appreciated.

>Thanks to all who respond.

Sorry...I didn't see this thread until just now.  I have an old Tri-Master
scribing template (several curved arcs) that I use sometimes.  I also use a
piece of an old aluminum mini-blind from a window as my guide.  If it seems
like a difficult surface, I try to tape the guide to the model with masking
tape.  I've used the tip of a sharp #11 Xacto blade but usually, I start
with a fresh straight pin in a mini drill chuch locked in a large size
Zacto handle.  I've found it works best to use the guide and straight pin
set-up to make a lightly scribed line where I want it.  Then I remove the
guide and use the light line as my guide to follow up with the sharp Zacto
blade.  Seems to work well and I've had pretty good luck with this method
so far.

Happy modeling:   ModelHawk
"...good times and riches and son of a ***es,
I've seen more than I can recall"        J Buffett

 
 
 

Scribing Panel Lines

Post by Rembra21 » Sat, 30 Aug 1997 04:00:00


I have found that on round surfaces Dymo tape (the easily available sticky
label maker tape) works great. It is thick enough to prevent slips and yet
flexible enough to wrap around a curve. Hope this helps

 
 
 

Scribing Panel Lines

Post by Bob MacMill » Sun, 31 Aug 1997 04:00:00


For a flexible straight edge, I use strips of styrene plastic
distributed by Evergreen Scale Models, of Kirkland Washington.  You
can get varying thicknesses and widths.  I use 3/8" wide and 0.040"
thick.  It's meant to be used for modelling metal roofing, but cuts
easily into scribing guides.  I find this product is flexible enough
to conform to 1:48 aircraft surfaces.

Hope this helps.

Bob

 
 
 

Scribing Panel Lines

Post by reaper0 » Tue, 02 Sep 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> Agreed - except I believe it's called Dymo tape (might make it easier
> to
> find in a store).  Another great advantage to this tape is that you
> can
> cut it into thinner strips, making it easier to tape down around
> coumpound curves.  Once you have it down, be patient.  Scrible
> LIGHTLY,
> just using the weight of the scriber as your pressure, and move
> slowly.

Note on scribing slowly. Make sure you do not stop. Stopping can cause
you to nick the sides of your scribed groove. These nicks are tricky to
remove without further damaging the groove.
 
 
 

Scribing Panel Lines

Post by reaper0 » Tue, 02 Sep 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> Agreed - except I believe it's called Dymo tape (might make it easier
> to
> find in a store).  Another great advantage to this tape is that you
> can
> cut it into thinner strips, making it easier to tape down around
> coumpound curves.  Once you have it down, be patient.  Scrible
> LIGHTLY,
> just using the weight of the scriber as your pressure, and move
> slowly.

Note on scribing slowly. Make sure you do not stop. Stopping can cause
you to nick the sides of your scribed groove. These nicks are tricky to
remove without further damaging the groove.
 
 
 

Scribing Panel Lines

Post by TRrmin » Tue, 02 Sep 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

>> Agreed - except I believe it's called Dymo tape (might make it easier
>> to
>> find in a store).  Another great advantage to this tape is that you
>> can
>> cut it into thinner strips, making it easier to tape down around
>> coumpound curves.  Once you have it down, be patient.  Scrible
>> LIGHTLY,
>> just using the weight of the scriber as your pressure, and move
>> slowly.

You're 100% correct-it's called Dymo Labeling tape, and it's available at
just about any stationery store.  A few pointers:

1.  Be sure to burnish the tape down tightly against the surface of
     the model.  The stuff sticks great, but it can lift while scribing
     if you don't burnish it down, turning your nice clean scribed
     line into a big scratch.

2.  After you've established your scribe line through several      passes,
give the line a quick rub with steel wool to remove
     the burrs along the sides of the scribed line.

3.  Once you've completed your engraving, remove all the
     labeling tape, and sand lightly with worn #600 paper, then
     give the model another rub with fine steel wool.  If any residue
     remains in the lines, try running it under very warm (not hot)
     tap water.  This should produce clean, burr-free, engraved
     panel lines.

Hope this helps- happy modelling!!!!!
Steve Filak (self-proclaimed master modeler)
"Modelling :It's not a matter of life and death, it's much more important
than that."
Member-Hudson Vally Historical Miniatures Guild

 
 
 

Scribing Panel Lines

Post by reaper0 » Tue, 02 Sep 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> Agreed - except I believe it's called Dymo tape (might make it easier
> to
> find in a store).  Another great advantage to this tape is that you
> can
> cut it into thinner strips, making it easier to tape down around
> coumpound curves.  Once you have it down, be patient.  Scrible
> LIGHTLY,
> just using the weight of the scriber as your pressure, and move
> slowly.

Note on scribing slowly. Make sure you do not stop. Stopping can cause
you to nick the sides of your scribed groove. These nicks are tricky to
remove without further damaging the groove.