Scribing Panel Lines

Scribing Panel Lines

Post by Tyle » Sat, 06 Jan 2001 00:38:53



I've heard a lot of talk about re-scribing panel lines. Can someone give me
an idea of the various techniques used for this?

I've just been using a knife and the edge of needle file

Tyler
Tech 1670

 
 
 

Scribing Panel Lines

Post by Jim » Sat, 06 Jan 2001 02:19:05


Personally I have found the various rescribing tools out there to be
useless.  I have also tried the back edge of the exacto blade, and
really didn't care for the look.  The thing that I have had the most
success with in a pin-vise and a sewing needle (shhhh, don't tell my
wife).  That's has given me the best results.

Then use Dymo tape for your straight edge (goto you office supply place
and ask for Dymo tape).

But like with anything else, just find something that works for you, and
that you are comfortable with.  Everybody has their own technique and it
may work for them and not for someone else.  I know others that like the
back edge of an exacto blade, I personally don't.

That's my 2 cents worth.....

--
Jim Fox
VP/Webmaster of IPMS Kalamazoo
http://www.geocities.com/scalemodelers

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http://www.deja.com/

 
 
 

Scribing Panel Lines

Post by Charles Met » Sat, 06 Jan 2001 02:09:45


 > I've heard a lot of talk about re-scribing panel lines. Can someone give
 > me an idea of the various techniques used for this?
 >
 > I've just been using a knife and the edge of needle file

My thoughts on this subject (and some contributions by others) can be
found in our rms FAQ
<http://www.ninfinger.org/~sven/models/rms_tips/rmsfaq.1.html> on the
page at <http://www.ninfinger.org/~sven/models/rms_tips/rmsfaq.19.html#q1>.

  Charles Metz

 
 
 

Scribing Panel Lines

Post by Jennings Heili » Sat, 06 Jan 2001 03:37:01


Quote:
> Personally I have found the various rescribing tools out there to be
> useless.  I have also tried the back edge of the exacto blade, and
> really didn't care for the look.  The thing that I have had the most
> success with in a pin-vise and a sewing needle (shhhh, don't tell my
> wife).  That's has given me the best results.

I have to agree.  Most scribing tools make a "V" shaped cut which is far too
wide, especially for a small scale model.  We could (and probably will) go
on and on about whether you can see panel lines on airplanes (you can, and
you do, and they get dirty, and I've got photos to prove it), but most of
what I've seen scribers do looks more appropriate to tanks or ships than to
aircraft.

I have some double edged razor blades (remember those?) which a pen pal in
Czechoslovakia made for me about 24 years ago, and they work great for
scribing straight lines.

I have an ancient drafting compass which has a point made out of Kryptonite
or something (it's *really* hard) which scribes very nicely.  I've also
picked up some scriber points at an art supply store which I can chuck into
a small pin vise, and they work well also.

Scribing tools actually do come in handy for scribing control surfaces where
a wider cut is more realistic, btw.

Quote:
> Then use Dymo tape for your straight edge (goto you office supply place
> and ask for Dymo tape).

Dymo tape is very good, as is just plain old thin sheet styrene (Evergreen).
It bends nicely, and provides a nice hard edge.

Quote:
> But like with anything else, just find something that works for you, and
> that you are comfortable with.  Everybody has their own technique and it
> may work for them and not for someone else.  I know others that like the
> back edge of an exacto blade, I personally don't.

NO! You *must* do it my way!   :)

Quote:
> That's my 2 cents worth.....

Mine .02

Quote:

> --
> Jim Fox
> VP/Webmaster of IPMS Kalamazoo
> http://www.geocities.com/scalemodelers

J (former Kalamazooan)
--
Jennings Heilig
Grand Poobah & Imperial High Czar
Liveries Unlimited/Airway Graphics International, LLC
P.O. Box 737
Blacksburg, VA  24063-0737
USA

http://www.airwaygraphics.com

 
 
 

Scribing Panel Lines

Post by JoBo » Sat, 06 Jan 2001 03:59:00


In the case of old model with raised panel lines do you usually sand
down the raised details first?  Can you use the raised panel line as a
guide for scribing?  Thanks.


Quote:


>  > I've heard a lot of talk about re-scribing panel lines. Can
someone give
>  > me an idea of the various techniques used for this?

>  > I've just been using a knife and the edge of needle file

> My thoughts on this subject (and some contributions by others) can be
> found in our rms FAQ
> <http://www.ninfinger.org/~sven/models/rms_tips/rmsfaq.1.html> on the
> page at

<http://www.ninfinger.org/~sven/models/rms_tips/rmsfaq.19.html#q1>.

Quote:

>   Charles Metz

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Scribing Panel Lines

Post by Tyle » Sat, 06 Jan 2001 04:41:23



Quote:
> In the case of old model with raised panel lines do you usually sand
> down the raised details first?  Can you use the raised panel line as a
> guide for scribing?  Thanks.

I'm think for both rescribing lines filled with putty or uneven from sanding
joints and scribing panel lines for scratchbuilt parts.

Tyler
Tech 1670

 
 
 

Scribing Panel Lines

Post by Ron Smit » Sat, 06 Jan 2001 12:49:08


Faugh!!!!!  Just take the things (scribing tools) to a waterstone and
recountour the cutting edge, works great! I also use an ancient (it was
part of the set used to layout Camp Springs Army Air Force Base) compass
point that I chuck in a pin vise and use for curves and panels with a
template.
Quote:

> > Personally I have found the various rescribing tools out there to be
> > useless.  I have also tried the back edge of the exacto blade, and
> > really didn't care for the look.  The thing that I have had the most
> > success with in a pin-vise and a sewing needle (shhhh, don't tell my
> > wife).  That's has given me the best results.

> I have to agree.  Most scribing tools make a "V" shaped cut which is far too
> wide, especially for a small scale model.  We could (and probably will) go
> on and on about whether you can see panel lines on airplanes (you can, and
> you do, and they get dirty, and I've got photos to prove it), but most of
> what I've seen scribers do looks more appropriate to tanks or ships than to
> aircraft.

 
 
 

Scribing Panel Lines

Post by Tim Campbel » Sun, 07 Jan 2001 09:38:02




Quote:
> I've heard a lot of talk about re-scribing panel lines. Can someone
give me
> an idea of the various techniques used for this?

I use a mixture of techniques mostly gained from an article by Charles
Metz (with numerous other contributors) in the IPMS Stockholm magazine
(http://www.hotel.wineasy.se/ipms).

For flat surfaces, I find my stainless steel 1cm wide flexible ruler
very reliable. Curved surfaces I do with Dymo tape (as others have
mentioned) and offcuts from photo-etched sheets (the "frame around the
parts) as this bends easily.

For the actual scribing, I alternate between a Squadron scriber and a
geologist's sample pick (basically a needle in a wooden handle - you
could use a sewing needle in a pin vise as already suggested).

It's trut that the scribing tool takes some practice - my first attempt
had me creating great troughs with the thing. All you need is a couple
of light passes to create a line. My Monogram MiG-29 sits there as a
reminder to me of how *not* to rescribe lines!

Perhaps the best thing to remember is to put the model down and try
again later if it's not going well. Scribing is not the most fun task,
so I wouldn't try and get the whole thing done at one sitting.

--
Regards,

Tim Campbell
Puiseux, France

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Scribing Panel Lines

Post by Tango » Mon, 08 Jan 2001 02:33:49


I use a pin I got after I bought a shirt, stabbed myself in the finger with
it taking the shirt out.  Chucked in the pinvise and scribe lightly with a
flexible steel rule or old plastic card like credit card stuff.  Then I went
over the line with a Olfa plastic cutter.  Looks ok.

Quote:

> > Personally I have found the various rescribing tools out there to be
> > useless.  I have also tried the back edge of the exacto blade, and
> > really didn't care for the look.  The thing that I have had the most
> > success with in a pin-vise and a sewing needle (shhhh, don't tell my
> > wife).  That's has given me the best results.

> I have to agree.  Most scribing tools make a "V" shaped cut which is far
too
> wide, especially for a small scale model.  We could (and probably will) go
> on and on about whether you can see panel lines on airplanes (you can, and
> you do, and they get dirty, and I've got photos to prove it), but most of
> what I've seen scribers do looks more appropriate to tanks or ships than
to
> aircraft.

> I have some double edged razor blades (remember those?) which a pen pal in
> Czechoslovakia made for me about 24 years ago, and they work great for
> scribing straight lines.

> I have an ancient drafting compass which has a point made out of
Kryptonite
> or something (it's *really* hard) which scribes very nicely.  I've also
> picked up some scriber points at an art supply store which I can chuck
into
> a small pin vise, and they work well also.

> Scribing tools actually do come in handy for scribing control surfaces
where
> a wider cut is more realistic, btw.

> > Then use Dymo tape for your straight edge (goto you office supply place
> > and ask for Dymo tape).

> Dymo tape is very good, as is just plain old thin sheet styrene
(Evergreen).
> It bends nicely, and provides a nice hard edge.

> > But like with anything else, just find something that works for you, and
> > that you are comfortable with.  Everybody has their own technique and it
> > may work for them and not for someone else.  I know others that like the
> > back edge of an exacto blade, I personally don't.

> NO! You *must* do it my way!   :)

> > That's my 2 cents worth.....

> Mine .02

> > --
> > Jim Fox
> > VP/Webmaster of IPMS Kalamazoo
> > http://www.geocities.com/scalemodelers

> J (former Kalamazooan)
> --
> Jennings Heilig
> Grand Poobah & Imperial High Czar
> Liveries Unlimited/Airway Graphics International, LLC
> P.O. Box 737
> Blacksburg, VA  24063-0737
> USA

> http://www.airwaygraphics.com

 
 
 

Scribing Panel Lines

Post by Bostjan Lemu » Mon, 08 Jan 2001 08:58:10


Quote:
> over the line with a Olfa plastic cutter.

Thank god someone else knows Olfa knife, I was already going nuts
everybody talking Exacto knifes.

Bostjan