WWII Aircraft Navigation Lights

WWII Aircraft Navigation Lights

Post by Rick DeNata » Tue, 12 Mar 1996 04:00:00




Quote:

>I remember reading somewhere that in the ETO it was common practice to
>vary the light colors of wing nav lights either on a mission specific or
>daily basis to aid in friend or foe identification. Is this true and
>if so was it also done in the Pacific by the Japanese? Were various
>placements of just red and green used or were other colors used?

I don't believe that they varied the nav lights, but many American planes
(don't know about other allies) had a set of three lights which were
colored red yellow(orange?) and green like a traffic light. These were
turned on in various combinations for recognition purposes.

--
Rick DeNatale
Still looking for a cool signature ;-)

 
 
 

WWII Aircraft Navigation Lights

Post by SC Lexic » Tue, 12 Mar 1996 04:00:00



Quote:

>I remember reading somewhere that in the ETO it was common practice to
>vary the light colors of wing nav lights either on a mission specific or
>daily basis to aid in friend or foe identification.

I've never heard of this and it would seem to be impractical.  More likely
the truth behind this would be the use of signal lights such as the well
known Aldis lamp which could quickly & easily be fitted with coloured
filters.  This would be a practice for multi crew aircraft, anyway - you
might have a little difficulty trying it in a single seater :-)

Simon Craven
Lexicat Ltd
England

 
 
 

WWII Aircraft Navigation Lights

Post by Mr Arch » Wed, 13 Mar 1996 04:00:00


Quote:
> I've been meaning to post a newsgroup message about those lights on
> the bottom of the Hellcat.  I don't think Hasegawa's instructions said
> they should be any color...should they?

Al,

From fore to aft: red, green, amber

Woody

 
 
 

WWII Aircraft Navigation Lights

Post by gryp.. » Thu, 14 Mar 1996 04:00:00


Speaking from a pilot's point of view - if any group was stupid enough to
try changing the colours of the navigation lights, they probably all
collided with each other and are no longer alive to tell.

Daily signal codes were displayed one of 3 ways - either by a series of
coloured lights (as mentioned - the Mustang), a series of flares
released through a small chute in the cokpit (as on the Mosquito), or a
pattern of flashes from a single light (as on the Spitfire). The Aldis
lamp was used for signals to and from a/c and the control tower.

American bombers released flares to signify crew and ship status to the
tower, but these should not be confused with the daily codes used to
identify themselves to the anti-aircraft lining the coast.

--
Bruce Squair
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